BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN West Long Branch

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in West Long Branch, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair West Long Branch, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair West Long Branch, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies West Long Branch, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair West Long Branch, NJ
 Waterproof Basement West Long Branch, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in West Long Branch

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in West Long Branch:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing West Long Branch, NJ

Latest News in West Long Branch, NJ

High-powered Monmouth football offense vs. Delaware defense: Scouting report, prediction

WEST LONG BRANCH – Jaden Shirden has been the best FCS running back by any objective measure this season. The Monmouth sophomore leads the nation in rushing yards (1,365) and yards-per-game (151.7), and his 8.69 yards-per-carry is nearly full yard clear of the next highest total.Now comes a Delaware defense that ranks No. 3 in the nation, led by linebacker Johnny Buchanan, with the former St. John Vianney standout leading the nation in tackles, averaging 12.9 per-game. They give up 266 yards of offe...

WEST LONG BRANCH – Jaden Shirden has been the best FCS running back by any objective measure this season. The Monmouth sophomore leads the nation in rushing yards (1,365) and yards-per-game (151.7), and his 8.69 yards-per-carry is nearly full yard clear of the next highest total.

Now comes a Delaware defense that ranks No. 3 in the nation, led by linebacker Johnny Buchanan, with the former St. John Vianney standout leading the nation in tackles, averaging 12.9 per-game. They give up 266 yards of offense per-game, while Shirden has topped the 200-yard mark himself in three different games.

It sets up and interesting showdown Saturday at Delaware Stadium, as Monmouth seeks to snap a three-game skid against the 16th-ranked Blue Hens, coming off a loss at Elon.

“They’re a very active defense,” Monmouth coach Kevin Callahan said. “It’s a different package than what you see from anybody else. It’s unique and (Buchanan) he plays what they call the Will, but they put him a lot of different spots. It’s a three safety defense by design and it creates a lot of different pictures.”

Shirden has six runs of 75 yards or more in the first 20 games of his career, including four in the last eight games.

Monmouth could have freshman quarterback Enzo Arjona in the backfield for a second straight game, with starter Tony Muskett likely a game-time decision due to a sore knee.

Arjona, the former Northern Highlands standout, threw for 213 yards and three TDs, with no turnovers, while running for another 35 yards.

“(Arjona) was really good,” Callahan said. “And as the game went on and we got into the second half, and the fourth quarter he was lights out. I don’t think he made a mistake. I there were any nerves going into it you could not tell. He has a lot of confidence in his ability. He made good decisions with the ball, and to do that in your first college game is impressive.”

Monmouth (4-5, 2-4) at No. 16/18 Delaware (6-2, 3-2)

When: Saturday, 1 p.m.

Where: Delaware Stadium, Newark, Del.

TV/Streaming/Audio: NBC Sports Philadelphia/FloSports/MonmouthHawks.com

Series: Delaware scored a 42-7 victory in 2007 in their only previous meeting.

When Delaware has the ball

Defense has been Monmouth’s Achilles’ heel this season, giving up an average of 445.6 yards, worst in the CAA, and 34.1 points, having given up a combined 100 points over the past two games. The Hawks have to be able to get Delaware off the field to have a chance, after Towson converted 12 of 15 third downs. And they’ve given up big passing plays in each of the past three games.

Monmouth needs to be stouter against the run, after the Tigers ran for 263 yards. Elon was able to hold Delaware to just 19 yards on 16 carries. Monmouth needs a big effort from its front seven on the road. Delaware QB Nolan Henderson has thrown for 20 TDs and been picked off six times. WR Jourdan Townsend is his favorite target, with 39 catches and four TDs. TE Braden Brose is a factor in the red zone, with four of his 10 catches resulting in touchdowns.

When Monmouth has the ball

Even with Arjona directing the offense last game, the Hawks rolled up 484 yards. They’re No. 6 nationally in total offense. What Monmouth has struggled with in recent games is short yardage, with teams loading up to stop power back Owen Wright, among the national leaders in touchdowns. Getting Shirden untracked early will be a key. If he can break a long run, it could help open the passing game up. Arjona hit WR Dymere Miller for a pair of TDs, including a 30-yarder in the first quarter.

In addition to Buchanan, LB Drew Nickles has two interceptions, four pass breakups, six QB hurries and a pair of fumble recoveries. DL Artis Hemmingway has seven tackles for losses and 1.5 sacks.

Special teams

An absolute disaster last game, as Monmouth gave up a 92-yard kickoff return in the fourth quarter, along with a 74-yard punt return in the first half. And there was another missed extra point.

Prediction: Delaware 40, Monmouth 24.

From Monday

Monmouth football: Frustration mounts as offense soars, defensive woes worsen

WEST LONG BRANCH – There was frustration in Monmouth coach Kevin Callahan’s voice Saturday as he tried to make sense of a 52-48 home loss to Towson, an emotion likely shared many in the stands at Kessler Stadium.

“We’re scoring an awful lot of points. We’re scoring points that most years you would say that’s plenty of points to win, and still we’re coming up short,” said Callahan, with 30 seasons worth of reference points since founding the program.

Monmouth's got a prolific offense. The Hawks rank sixth nationally in total offense, and are top-10 in rushing offense, passing efficiency and first downs made. Except the gap's widening in relation to a struggling defense that checks in at No. 102 among 123 FCS teams.

And it's that disparity that threatens to slam shut the window of opportunity for what could be a groundbreaking period for the program.

“There are some things, scheme-wise, personnel-wise, whatever it is, there are some things we’re not completely successful with right now,” he said.

Translation: Everything has to be better, from gameplans, coaching and execution to recruiting.

There’s still time. Even though they won't be going to the FCS Playoffs after three straight losses, quarterback Tony Muskett and receiver Dymere Miller are both juniors with two years of eligibility left, and running back Jaden Shirden, who leads the nation in rushing yards and rushing yards-per-game, is only a sophomore.

Monmouth's players have continued to fight hard each week in some wild games. But they're outmanned, and now the toughest schedule in program history, part of its inaugural season in the Colonial Athletic Association, is exacting its toll.

Towson showcased how much work lies ahead for Callahan, in need of solutions in the final two games, and beyond, after the Tigers, who had struggled moving the ball and scoring, finished with 474 yards of offense, including 263 yards on the ground.

The Hawks started a true freshman quarterback in Enzo Arjona - Tony Muskett was nursing a sore knee - and still rolled up 484 yards of offense, pulling the Hawks within a single score three different times in the game’s final eight minutes, with specials teams playing a big role in the end-game failure.

Solutions needed

The 2017 season was a seminal moment for the program. Kessler Stadium opened and Monmouth began receiving votes in the FCS Top 25 polls for the first time. And Kenji Bahar opened the season as Monmouth’s starting quarterback, marking the beginning of the program’s rise as an offensive force.

Since then, Monmouth’s offense has on average been ranked 21st in the country, while the defense’s average rank has been 63.

This season, New Hampshire, Fordham, Rhode Island and Towson all scored the game-winning or tying points in the final minutes. In a 49-42 win over Villanova, the Wildcats came back to tie the game six times after Monmouth touchdowns. And they've given up four plays of 61 yards or longer over the past three weekends.

The defense has to get bigger, stronger and faster as a unit, as soon as possible. Monmouth has a group of freshmen defenders, including linebacker Charlie Sasso, the former Wall standout, but for the most part they’ve remained on the sideline, although rookie defensive end Miles Mitchell has seen his role increased.

Transfers have never been a big part of what Monmouth does, and of the three defensive transfers last offseason only starting safety T.J. Kamara has had an impact. But everything needs to be on the table at this point.

Something has to change, and maybe its not be a quick fix. But it would be a shame if Monmouth’s unable to take advantage of an offense capable of taking it to the highest levels of FCS football.

Field Hockey: North Jersey, Group 1 first round roundup, Oct. 31 (PHOTOS)

Kayla Connors had a goal and an assist for ninth-seeded Belvidere (11-7) in its 2-0 victory against eighth-seeded Boonton in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Boonton.Ellie Kardos got Belvidere (11-7) on the board in the second quarter before Connors tacked on another goal in the fourth.Tayla Szmak recorded 11 saves for Boonton (8-11).Belvidere will face top-seeded Shore in the quarterfinals on Thursday.Mountain Lakes 5, Bernards 1Hannah Lees tallied two goals and two assists...

Kayla Connors had a goal and an assist for ninth-seeded Belvidere (11-7) in its 2-0 victory against eighth-seeded Boonton in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Boonton.

Ellie Kardos got Belvidere (11-7) on the board in the second quarter before Connors tacked on another goal in the fourth.

Tayla Szmak recorded 11 saves for Boonton (8-11).

Belvidere will face top-seeded Shore in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Mountain Lakes 5, Bernards 1

Hannah Lees tallied two goals and two assists to lead third-seeded Mountain Lakes past 14th-seeded Bernards 5-1 in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Mountain Lakes.

Mountain Lakes (17-1) took a 3-0 lead into halftime before adding two more goals in the third quarter. Melina Penniston also recorded two assists while Arianna Fragomeni made five saves.

Hope Kaczynski recorded 16 saves for Bernards (6-12-1) while Kendall Schmerler scored off an assist from Bella Galantino.

Mountain Lakes outshot Bernards 26-6.

Mountain Lakes will face sixth-seeded Wallkill Valley in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Wallkill Valley 7, Metuchen 1

Kellie Roth recorded four goals and one assist to propel sixth-seeded Wallkill Valley to a 7-1 victory over 11th-seeded Metuchen in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Hamburg.

Wallkill Valley (10-8-1) took a 3-1 lead into halftime before pulling away in the third with four more goals. Sarina Sanders also had two goals and four assists.

Rayna Israel made 11 saves for Metuchen (7-12) while Allison Kowalski scored a goal.

Wallkill Valley will face third-seeded Mountain Lakes in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Lenape Valley 5, Pequannock 0

Lindsay Fehir tallied two goals and an assist to lead fourth-seeded Lenape Valley past 13th-seeded Pequannock 5-0 in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Stanhope.

Lenape Valley (13-4-1) went into halftime up 3-0 before adding two more goals in the second half. Mia Vergano also had a goal and an assist while Abby Coppolella earned a one-save shutout.

Kaeli Robinson recorded eight saves for Pequannock (7-12-1).

Lenape Valley will face fifth-seeded Newton in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

No. 6 Shore 7, High Point 0

Maggie McCrae scored four goals to lead top-seeded Shore, No. 6 in the NJ.com Top 20, past 16th-seeded High Point 7-0 in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in West Long Branch.

Shore (17-2-1) took a 4-0 lead into halftime before pulling away in the second half with three more goals. Maddie Malfa also scored twice while Teagan Harmon earned a four-save shutout.

Eliana Savopoulos tallied 24 saves for High Point (8-9).

Shore outshot High Point 40-4.

Shore will face ninth-seeded Belvidere in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Pompton Lakes 6, Butler 0

Isabel Maher and Krista Lilienthal each had two goals and two assists as second-seeded Pompton Lakes defeated 15th-seeded Butler in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Pompton Lakes.

Pompton Lakes (19-2) took a 2-0 lead into halftime before adding two more goals in the fourth quarter. Sophia Torticill also scored twice.

Bella Kloss recorded 12 saves for Butler (7-11-1).

Pompton Lakes will face 10th-seeded Ramsey in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Ramsey 2, Johnson 1

Ellie Hudson and Bianca Aliano each had a goal and an assist as 10th-seeded Ramsey defeated seventh-seeded Johnson 2-1 in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Clark.

Johnson (11-9) took a 1-0 lead into halftime before Ramsey (12-6) tied the game in the third and scored the go-ahead goal in the fourth. Taylor Summers also recorded 13 saves.

Zoey Brown scored for Johnson while Maria Dante made six saves.

Ramsey will face second-seeded Pompton Lakes in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

Newton 1, Verona 0

Fifth-seeded Newton defeated 12th-seeded Verona 1-0 in the first round of the North Jersey, Group 1 tournament in Newton.

With the win, Newton improved to 11-6-2 while Verona fell to 9-8.

Newton will face fourth-seeded Lenape Valley in the quarterfinals on Thursday.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here. Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Monmouth basketball 2022-23 preview: Reasons to hope & mope, must-see games, prediction

WEST LONG BRANCH - Everything will be different this season.There’s a new league, with Monmouth jumping from the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to the Colonial Athletic Association. And there’s lot of new faces in the rotation, with six seniors, including four fifth-year players, having departed.And perhaps a slightly different brand of basketball, as the young Hawks look to forge an identity.“We talked about it coming in this summer This is our time,” said junior point guard My...

WEST LONG BRANCH - Everything will be different this season.

There’s a new league, with Monmouth jumping from the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference to the Colonial Athletic Association. And there’s lot of new faces in the rotation, with six seniors, including four fifth-year players, having departed.

And perhaps a slightly different brand of basketball, as the young Hawks look to forge an identity.

“We talked about it coming in this summer This is our time,” said junior point guard Myles Ruth. “We all went through the last few years together and we know the ropes a little bit, but we’re still figuring some things out.”

After winning 21 games last season, losing in the MAAC Tournament final to Elite Eight-bound Saint Peter's, the expectations are tempered, with the current roster featuring just three players who logged double-digit minutes a year ago.

Three Reasons to Hope

1. Young talent

It’s what makes this team uniquely intriguing. The ability to finally see a group of young players, who have spent a year or two learning from older guys, take the court and try to develop as a team, growing pains and all. Pulling your hair out with the mistakes and celebrating the successes.

2. Size inside

The addition of freshmen Amaan Sandhu, a 7-foot center, and Jaret Valencia, a long 6-9 forward, gives the Hawks a different look in the paint this season when combined with: Klemen Vuga, a 6-10 junior and likely opening night center; Jarvis Vaughan, a 6-9 redshirt junior penciled in to start but currently nursing a sore knee; and Tadhg Crowley, a 6-10 sophomore.

The Hawks should be able to hold their own on the glass. Myles Foster, the 6-7 junior forward who ranks as the most experienced Hawk, averaged 3.0 rebounds last season, and looked like their best player in the preseason.

Sandhu missed time with a preseason injury, but the athletic Valencia figures to get good minutes early on.

3. Fans return?

Two season ago, the games were played in an empty OceanFirst Bank Center due to the COVID-19 pandemic restrictions. And while fans returned last season, the mask requirement clearly hurt attendance.

But this season there are no restrictions. The question now is whether or not fans will return.

The Hawks had an average attendance of 1,688 last season, the lowest total since OFBC opened in 2009.

Three Reasons to Mope

1. Lack of experience

The top six players in Monmouth’s rotation are gone. And even if those stepping into the lineup are as talented, they don’t have the experiences to fall back on.

The inability to land a veteran player via the transfer portal hurts, with the Drame twins visiting before opting to shift from Saint Peter’s to LaSalle in the Atlantic 10, and Jersey Shore native Bryan Antoine ending up at Radford when he bolted Villanova.

“An older presence would help this group right now,” Monmouth coach King Rice said.

2. Lack of scoring

Gone are 85.9 percent of the scoring from last season. And while players like swingmen Tahron Allen, expected to start, freshmen Jack Collins and Andrew Ball, and sophomore Jayden Doyle have to be able to make shots, it’s unrealistic to think this group can completely fill this void.

So this team will have to play a different type of game, centered around being tenacious defenders. The Hawks' trapping defense is the best way to jumpstart an offense looking to play fast if it can.

“We’re trying to get them to understand that the way this team can be really good is defensively, really going after people with numbers,” Rice said. “And then everybody just be OK with four guys averaging 10 points. That’s a lot of points, and if they get to five at 10 then we’re really rolling.”

3. Brutal schedule

While wins will be hard to come by, Monmouth will certainly be battle tested when it gets through a brutal non-conference slate that includes four high-major foes. We’re going to find a lot out about this team's competitiveness, and if they can land some punches and learn from the experience it will have been worth it.

We'll have a better idea of where they stand after a stretch of games that begins the day after Thanksgiving against Cornell, followed by Lehigh, Rider, Manhattan and Princeton.

Five Must-See Games

At Seton Hall, Nov. 9: An easy trip for fans, a nice payday for Monmouth and a great move by Shaheen Holloway to bring the Hawks in for his first game post-Saint Peter’s.

Norfolk State at home, Nov. 17: The home opener is no joke, with the MEAC power coming off a 24-win season, led by reigning Player of the Year Joe Bryant Jr.

At Princeton, Dec. 10: The second of two Central Jersey showdowns – at Rider on Nov. 30 – comes against a team that’s also reloading.

At Towson, Jan. 14: Monmouth’s best win last season was over a 25-win Towson team. Now the young Hawks return to face the preseason favorites.

Hofstra at home, Feb. 11: Jalen Ray is finally gone, but reigning CAA Player of the Year Aaron Estrada remains. Hofstra’s beaten Monmouth in each of the past five seasons.

Our Prediction

On paper, this looks an awful lot like 2013-14, when Monmouth transitioned into the MAAC from the Northeast Conference. For what it's worth, they're ranked eighth among the 13 CAA teams in the preseason KenPom Ratings. With that as a guide, there should be some competitive games. And if this team shows improvement as the league slate grinds on, that's a win.

Projected record: 11-21 (7-11 CAA).

Toms River Ramada sold, and it won't be a hotel anymore

TOMS RIVER - With the building now under new ownership, the Ramada Hotel by Wyndham of Toms River has closed for good, part of a plan to convert the hotel's rooms into office suites.“We thank all of our patrons and guest for 32 years of business,” the hotel’s owner, Hotels Unlimited of East Windsor said in a statement to What’s Going There. ”Our decision to sell the Ramada was based on significant interest in converting the building to meet the office needs of the local community."...

TOMS RIVER - With the building now under new ownership, the Ramada Hotel by Wyndham of Toms River has closed for good, part of a plan to convert the hotel's rooms into office suites.

“We thank all of our patrons and guest for 32 years of business,” the hotel’s owner, Hotels Unlimited of East Windsor said in a statement to What’s Going There. ”Our decision to sell the Ramada was based on significant interest in converting the building to meet the office needs of the local community."

Last month, the Toms River Planning Board approved a plan by Westwood Two LLC to convert the Ramada into a 51,100-square-foot office building.

The hotel will be converted into 104 high-end office suites, according to a Linked In post by Steven Vegh, president of Westwood Realty Associates. It was sold for more than $22.3 million, the post states.

The office building includes 969 square feet of meeting rooms and a 15,000-square-foot restaurant, according to the Planning Board's resolution. An existing tent area, two extended-stay buildings, containing 52 units, and a ballroom will remain.

Located on Route 9 near the intersection of Route 70 and Lakewood, the hotel sits on more than eight acres. In 2014, it underwent a ceiling to floor renovation project. And for the last two summers, it served as home for the Jersey Shore BlueClaws, whose players could no longer stay with host families as they had traditionally done because of the pandemic.

The hotel closed on Nov. 1.

"We have built many happy memories and deep ties within the Toms River area, and these ties will grow as we continue to operate the nearby Days Hotel by Wyndham Toms River and Hilton Garden Inn Lakewood hotels," Hotels Unlimited said.

Hotels Unlimited also owns Sheraton in Eatontown, Holiday Inn Express in Neptune and West Long Branch, Radisson in Freehold and DoubleTree by Hilton in Tinton Falls.

David P. Willis, an award-winning business writer, has covered business and consumer news at the Asbury Park Press for more than 20 years. He writes APP.com's What's Going There and Press on Your Side columns and can be reached at [email protected] Join his What's Going There page on Facebook for updates.

Monmouth women's basketball preview: Hawks' hopes center on Belle Kranbuhl

WEST LONG BRANCH – As the Monmouth women’s basketball program transitions into the Colonial Athletic Association, success means squeezing every last ounce of production out of its roster. And arguably the most important part of that process involves getting more out of 6-3 center Belle Kranbuhl.No one got more rebounds-per-minute for the Hawks last season, and only guard Kaci Donovan averaged more points-per-minute than Kranbuhl, now a junior.So it’s no surprise the top item on an...

WEST LONG BRANCH – As the Monmouth women’s basketball program transitions into the Colonial Athletic Association, success means squeezing every last ounce of production out of its roster. And arguably the most important part of that process involves getting more out of 6-3 center Belle Kranbuhl.

No one got more rebounds-per-minute for the Hawks last season, and only guard Kaci Donovan averaged more points-per-minute than Kranbuhl, now a junior.

So it’s no surprise the top item on an offseason to-do list involved getting her on the court for more minutes, beginning with Monday night’s season-opener at St. John’s.

After averaging 18 minutes last season, Krabuhl underwent a grueling program designed to both improve her strength and conditioning, while trying to push her skillset in the paint to the next level.

“It was really tough,” Kranbuhl said. “When someone asks you to key in on a whole lot of different aspects of your life, like your health and your fitness, or your basketball skills, or whatever it might be, it’s just really hard to do something like that. So it took a lot of work, a lot of mental focus.

“There were days I wasn’t sure I was going to make it through, and my teammates were always there for me, and their kind words to me, I just had to push through and kept a good mental attitude.”

Kranbuhl averaged 6.9 points and 5.8 rebounds as a sophomore. But those numbers were down from the 7.2 points and 8.0 rebounds she posted a year earlier, when she logged 25.1 minutes.

“Belle played six-and-a-half minutes in the scrimmage without coming out the other day, and that is the longest stretch she’s played since I’ve been here without needing a sub,” said Monmouth coach Ginny Boggess, entering her second season. “We’re really encouraged by the work she’s put in.”

Kranbuhl was part of a rotation in the paint last season along with graduate forward Lucy Thomas, the former Saint Rose star who averaged 6.3 points and 4.4 rebounds in 17 minutes-per-game.

“The thing that I challenged her and Lucy on is you don’t have to do it alone. You really do have a wing man,” Boggess said. “So Belle, go in and give us all you’ve got and here comes Lucy to wear them out even more, and think of it that way. We are going to run their fives out of the gym and make them work really hard.”

New faces blend with returnees

Monmouth went 14-16 overall and 9-11 in the Metro Atlantic Athletic Conference. But Boggess feels the addition of five new players will make a big impact. Forward Lovin Marsicano and point guard Bri Tinsely, both graduate transfers, are expected to start, while freshman guards Amiya Carroll and Anaya Coleman, and freshman forward Ella Farrelly will all have roles off the bench.

“We are bigger and we’re more mature and we’re more athletic and we have more depth, and I’m really encouraged by all of those things,” Boggess said. “Now we have to just peel off some of those bad habits.”

The group joins returnees like the 6-1 Donovan, who transferred from Penn State prior to the 2021-22 season and hit the second-most three-pointers last season.

“You can see it physically,” Boggess said. “Things are starting to click. She really worked hard in the weight room. Her schedule allowed for a lot of individual work with strength coach on our staff, and we’re really excited about her willingness to do what we need.”

Also expected to start is junior guard Arayana Vanderhoop, third on the team in both scoring and rebounding last season.

“She was our best defender last year. She guarded the best players in the MAAC,” Boggess said. “This year we’re looking for her to take it up a notch on the offensive end.”

Defend, defend, defend

It was at the defensive end that Monmouth did some of its best work last season, finishing 52nd out of 348 Division I programs in three-point defense, and in the top-third nationally in scoring defense.

And the Hawks will have to play better just to match those numbers in their ultra-competitive new home.

“I think the depth will allow me to hold our players accountable defensively. That is where I want to see the most growth is on defense,” Boggess said.

“We talked about the three keys: ball pressure; protecting the paint; and finishing the play. We want to pressure the ball so it makes it harder on their quarterback making decisions, We want to control the paint so we’re not in scramble mode, and we’ve got to rebound and finish the play. Hopefully our size and athleticism will help us there.”

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.