BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Wall

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Wall, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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Basement Waterproofing in Wall

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Wall:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Wall

Yankees lose 7th straight against Red Sox, get embarrassed | Rapid reaction

NEW YORK — The Yankees can spell hell with seven straight L’s to the Red Sox.Friday’s 4-0 loss to the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium had a little bit of everything that makes it look like it might be a long, ugly final two months of the season in the Bronx. They fell to 0-7 against Boston on the season and nine games back of their hated rivals in the American League East.The Yankees’ bats were unproductive, compiling just three hits and going 0-for-3 with runners in scoring position. Starting pitcher J...

NEW YORK — The Yankees can spell hell with seven straight L’s to the Red Sox.

Friday’s 4-0 loss to the Red Sox at Yankee Stadium had a little bit of everything that makes it look like it might be a long, ugly final two months of the season in the Bronx. They fell to 0-7 against Boston on the season and nine games back of their hated rivals in the American League East.

The Yankees’ bats were unproductive, compiling just three hits and going 0-for-3 with runners in scoring position. Starting pitcher Jordan Montgomery put the Yankees in an early hole. Giancarlo Stanton struck out another three times and heard the wrath of the 40,130 in attendance.

It looked a lot like the same Yankees team that looked painfully mediocre throughout the first half, despite manager Aaron Boone’s consistent pledges that he believed it would turn around.

Yet, it was somehow worse.

The Yankees’ best hitter, Aaron Judge, went on the COVID-19 injured list, and he was joined by third baseman Gio Urshela and four others. Slugging first baseman Luke Voit (knee) was also put on the injured list.

The array of no-name players they called up from Triple-A Scranton/Wilkes-Barre earlier in the day were overmatched.

And at the end, $16-million-a-year closer Aroldis Chapman even had to pitch because the Yankees can’t trust him in anything but the most meaningless of circumstances. Chapman was a couple feet away from surrendering a leadoff home run to center field and then another that was caught at the right field wall to end the inning. He committed a throwing error to first base that allowed the batter he walked to move to second.

Montgomery lasted six innings, giving up three runs while walking three, allowing four hits and striking out four. It was the fifth straight start in which Montgomery got zero runs of support, tying the longest streak in team history. He fell to 3-5 with a 4.18 ERA.

After a 1-2-3 first inning, the Red Sox jumped all over Montgomery in a three-run second frame. Xander Bogaerts led it off with a walk and then Rafael Devers laced a line-drive double to center, which moved Bogaerts to third. Hunter Renfroe’s groundout to shortstop scored Boston’s first run, and then with two outs, No. 8 hitter Christian Arroyo crushed a 2-1 changeup over the wall in right-center for a two-run home run.

But the left-hander recovered, retiring 13 of the final 14 batters he faced and throwing 92 total pitches.

J.D. Martinez crushed solo homer off Justin Wilson in the eighth. Wilson has given up at least a run in four of his last six appearances.

The Yankees had a half-hearted rally in the seventh. Chris Gittens drew a two-out walk, and then he moved to third base on pinch hitter Greg Allen’s single to right field. But the next pinch hitter, Hoy Park, in his first big-league at-bat, tapped one weakly to third base to end the threat.

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Brendan Kuty may be reached at [email protected]. Tell us your coronavirus story or send a tip here.

\'Glory Days\': Max Weinberg\'s Jukebox ready to play the hits and more at upcoming NJ shows

What are the songs that light up Max Weinberg\'s Jukebox?Weinberg, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, knows.“Everybody wants to hear ‘American Girl’ by Tom Petty and ‘Highway to Hell’ by AC/DC, but it really is a range of material,” Weinberg said. “Some nights it’s very heavy on the Beatles, sometimes it\'s a little bit more American rock \'n\' roll. It’s always different. I never know what we’re going to play...

What are the songs that light up Max Weinberg\'s Jukebox?

Weinberg, Rock and Roll Hall of Fame drummer for Bruce Springsteen and the E Street Band, knows.

“Everybody wants to hear ‘American Girl’ by Tom Petty and ‘Highway to Hell’ by AC/DC, but it really is a range of material,” Weinberg said. “Some nights it’s very heavy on the Beatles, sometimes it\'s a little bit more American rock \'n\' roll. It’s always different. I never know what we’re going to play.”

The Jukebox features about 250 songs from the \'60s and \'70s, chosen by fans and performed by Weinberg and his band. “Glory Days” by Springsteen and the E Street Band is always a big hit.

Sometimes they\'ll get a request for a song that\'s not on the Jukebox. One night in Indiana, a young fan requested “Unsainted” by Slipknot. Weinberg\'s son Jay is their drummer.

“I’m your son Jay’s biggest fan,” said the fan.

Weinberg, a native of South Orange, told the kid to stay in school and get good grades, like Jay did, and keep on drumming. Then they played “Unsainted.”

“I did a vocal that imitated, very badly, Corey Taylor,” Weinberg said. “He was completely there, this kid.”

The Jukebox is headed to Jersey with shows Friday, July 16, and Saturday, July 17, at the Concerts on the Green series at Suneagles Golf Club in Eatontown, presented by the Count Basie Center for the Arts in Red Bank.

The Jukebox also hits the New Jersey Lottery Festival of Ballooning in Readington on Friday, July 23. The fest, which runs through Sunday, July 25, also features performances by Laurie Berkner on the 23rd; the Barenaked Ladies on the 24th; and Styx on the 25th. Visit www.balloonfestival.com for more info.

The show Friday at Suneagles will be extra special. It marks the return of Jukebox member Bob Burger to the concert stage after he had a heart attack June 5 at the Vogel of the Basie in Red Bank during an Elvis Costello tribute show.

“I’m excited to be testing the waters with Max Weinberg on Friday,” said Burger via email. “Don’t worry! I have doctor’s permission!!”

Weinberg\'s Jukebox includes Burger, Glen Burtnik and John Merjave, members of the Asbury Park-based Weeklings who will play, with Burger, Aug. 28 at the Vogel.

“Bob is a dear friend and a great musician,” Weinberg said. “As somebody who has had experience with medical issues, including heart disease, there’s no such thing as a minor heart attack. It\'s all about the time they take to treat you.”

Thankfully, Burger was treated immediately after he had the incident. Weinberg had open-heart surgery in 2010.

“Bob\'s on the mend now,” Weinberg said. “He\'s feeling great.”

Story continues after gallery

Weinberg knows the terrain at Suneagles. The golf course was formerly part of Fort Monmouth, where the E Street Band used to rehearse back in the day. He has other connections, too. His wife Becky used to live at the fort when her father was in the Army and Weinberg used to play there in the \'60s.

“I had a gig at the non-commissioned officers club,” Weinberg said. “I can remember driving to get there down Shrewsbury Avenue, which at the time was only two lanes. It was completely wooded on both sides.”

Weinberg has done it all, including late night stardom with Conan O\'Brien for nearly two decades, and he\'s ready for anything — including a potential E Street Band tour next year.

“I have no definitive information but I have a motto,” Weinberg said. “If you stay ready, you won’t have to get ready.”

Max Weinberg\'s Jukebox, 7:30 p.m. Friday, July 16, and Saturday, July 17, Concerts on the Green series at Suneagles Golf Club, Hope Road, Eatontown. Starting at $49. thebasie.org.

Mad Dog in town

Max Weinberg is not the only E Street Band drummer playing the Jersey Shore this weekend.

Vini “Mad Dog” Lopez, the person who founded the group that would become known as the E Street Band, plays Saturday, July 17, at the Wonder Bar in Asbury Park with the Wonderful Winos.

Who\'s a Wonderful Wino? Gary Cavico, Frank Frasche, Jon Sebastian Brice, and Lopez, that\'s who. The show starts at 8 p.m. and there\'s two sets.

Wonderful Winos with Vino “Mad Dog” Lopez, 8 p.m. Saturday, July 17, Wonder Bar, Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park. $15. wonderbarasburypark.com.

\'Miami\' Marc Ribler

There\'s only one Steven Van Zandt.

But who reminds Van Zandt of himself? Jackson native Marc Ribler, that\'s who. Ribler is the guitar ace who\'s the music director of Van Zandt\'s Disciples of Soul.

“This Marc Ribler guy, he reminds me of me,” said Van Zandt, as told by Rich Russo. The comparison came up following a screening of the new Disciples of Soul concert movie, “Summer Of Sorcery Live! At The Beacon Theatre,” July 8 at the IFC Center in New York City.

“That\'s the greatest compliment I\'ve ever gotten in my life from someone like Steven who I put in such high (regard),” Ribler said. “The quality of his work and his sense of music and of history and producing and writing, he\'s one of the most talented cats around. For him to say that, I\'m blown away.”

Ribler has a new album, “The Whole World Awaits You,” out Friday July 16, via Van Zandt\'s Wicked Cool Records/The Orchard.

Van Zandt is the co-producer and plenty of Disciples play on it, too. It\'s a keeper, with lots of jangly guitars, pristine melodies, soothing harmonies and rock \'n\' roll abandon. Visit www.marcribler.com to get a signed LP or CD.

See Ribler live when he\'s not on tour, 4 to 7 p.m. Sundays at McCann\'s Restaurant at the Spring Meadow Gold Course, 4185 Atlantic Ave., Wall; 7 to 10 p.m. Wednesdays at Salty\'s Beach Bar, the former Paul\'s Tavern, 1705 Main St., Lake Como; and 8 to 11 Thursdays at Triumph Brewing, 1 Bridge Ave., Red Bank.

Subscribe to app.com for the latest on the Jersey music scene.

Chris Jordan, a Jersey Shore native, covers entertainment and features for the USA Today Network New Jersey. Contact him at @chrisfhjordan; [email protected]

Bridge to nowhere, meet road to perdition | Letters

A letter featured recently on nj.com (“N.J. getting its own bridge to nowhere,” from Jeff Schaengold) cited a $140 million Monmouth County replacement bridge project between Rumson and Sea Bright, because it leads into an area that is frequentl...

A letter featured recently on nj.com (“N.J. getting its own bridge to nowhere,” from Jeff Schaengold) cited a $140 million Monmouth County replacement bridge project between Rumson and Sea Bright, because it leads into an area that is frequently flooded.

Why does this surprise anyone? This is just one example of how the general public pays taxes and increased tolls to benefit a select few or make them rich. There are others, and they involve a trick that makes the overall public think their tax dollars are hard at work for them.

The No. 1 case is the bike lanes frequently seen on our roads. Someone got the contract to supply the paint. Someone got the contract to paint the lanes. The public sees this as a good thing. “Look at these nice bike lanes!” people exclaim, even if the lanes are seldom used and mostly about the few who got paid to do the work.

A larger project that makes me wonder about this is the “Direct Connection” in Camden County, where Interstates 295 and 76, and Route 42 converge. A portion of a retaining wall collapsed in March. Do our engineers really allow for major collapses? Already years behind schedule, will the $900 million project go on and on like the “Big Dig” in Boston?

Who pays for cost overruns? And, why should taxpayers pay for contractor errors? Will the improved I-295 be safe, or only as safe as the Champlain Towers South in Surfside, Florida?

School construction is interesting, as well. Why are the same architects and engineers always being used? Again, the public sees a new school or an updated addition, yet the same entities always get the jobs.

At what other places does a gullible public think a project is solely for their benefit, when a select few are getting rich from it?

S.M. Combs, Sewell

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No reports of tornadoes, major damage so far in N.J. from Elsa. Tropical storm warnings canceled.

While multiple tornado warnings were issued early Friday as Tropical Storm Elsa swept north along the Jersey Shore, there have been no reports of funnel clouds touching down so far and skies are beginning to clear as the storm leaves the state, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service said.The ...

While multiple tornado warnings were issued early Friday as Tropical Storm Elsa swept north along the Jersey Shore, there have been no reports of funnel clouds touching down so far and skies are beginning to clear as the storm leaves the state, a meteorologist with the National Weather Service said.

The National Weather Service issued three tornado warnings, which have since expired, at the following locations along the Jersey Shore, which included about 580,000 residents:

Brian Haines, a meteorologist at the National Weather Service office in Mount Holly, said the weather service is “actively investigating” for any reports of tornadoes, storm-related damage and injuries.

“It’s still early in the morning so as people wake up, we may receive more information. We will continue to analyze radar data to target phone calls and monitor the situation,” Haines said.

Tropical storm warnings were canceled for all coastal counties as of 7:30 a.m. as the storm continues to push north.

“Tropical Storm Elsa is east of northern New Jersey and continues to track away from the region,” the National Weather Service said in its update canceling the tropical storm warnings. “Lingering rain is tapering off. Dangerous rip currents will develop along the ocean beaches of Delaware and New Jersey.”

Flash flood watches are in effect for Monmouth, Middlesex, Morris, Somerset and Sussex counties through noon, as well as flood advisories in Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Passaic and Union counties until early Saturday.

Up to 4 inches of rain was expected for parts of New Jersey.

More than 8,200 New Jersey homes and businesses were without power Friday as of 7:50 a.m. That’s down from 35,000 outages Thursday evening after an onset of thunderstorms that preceded Elsa.

Gov. Phil Murphy encouraged residents on Thursday to take Elsa “seriously,” recommending that people on the Jersey Shore make preparations.

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NJ towns sue makers of ‘forever chemicals,’ saying companies must pay for cleanup

Four New Jersey towns and an investor-owned water supplier are suing 3M, DuPont and other makers of PFAS — so-called forever chemicals — saying the companies knew their products would contaminate drinking water but continued to sell them, and must now pay for their cleanup.Camden and Point Pleasant are suing the companies in federal court in South Carolina — ...

Four New Jersey towns and an investor-owned water supplier are suing 3M, DuPont and other makers of PFAS — so-called forever chemicals — saying the companies knew their products would contaminate drinking water but continued to sell them, and must now pay for their cleanup.

Camden and Point Pleasant are suing the companies in federal court in South Carolina — where some cases are consolidated — for the manufacture and sale of the chemicals used in firefighting foam. This product has contaminated groundwater in many places around the country, especially on and near military bases.

Meanwhile, Hopatcong, Pequannock and the Middlesex Water Company are suing in federal court in New Jersey, seeking compensation for the costs of removing per- and polyfluoroalkyl substances (PFAS) from public water supplies to comply with health standards recently set by New Jersey.

“3M marketed and sold PFAS in New Jersey with the knowledge that PFAS would be released into the environment and without warning users or others of the risks of PFAS to the environment and to human health,” Middlesex said in an amended suit, filed in May.

Getting chemicals out of drinking water

The lawsuits are the latest in a series of legal, regulatory and legislative efforts to reduce the chemicals in drinking water sources, where they are believed to threaten public health, or to seek compensation from those held responsible for the contamination.

In 2019, Ridgewood Water, a publicly owned water utility in Bergen County, sued DuPont, saying the chemical giant was responsible for the PFAS in its public wells that forced it to install filtration equipment to meet the new state standards. New Jersey’s Department of Environmental Protection last year sued Solvay, a South Jersey chemical manufacturer, accusing it of contaminating groundwater with perfluorononanoic acid (PFNA), a type of PFAS.

And the DEP has in the last several years set some of the nation’s strictest health standards for the presence of three kinds of PFAS in drinking water, responding to gathering evidence that the chemicals are linked to some cancers, immune-system problems, high cholesterol and other illnesses.

The manmade chemicals have been extensively used since the 1940s in consumer products such as flameproof fabrics and some food packaging. They do not break down in the environment, leading to their label as “forever chemicals,” and they accumulate in the human body. Scientists say the chemicals are now present in the blood of virtually every American.

Despite increasing health worries, the chemicals are not nationally regulated, leaving states such as New Jersey to set their own standards.

Filtration: $10M

New Jersey regulations now require public water systems to ensure low levels of the chemicals in their water, and affected utilities must spend around $10 million for each filtration system, said Kevin Madonna, an attorney for the plaintiffs.

“Water utilities face a legal requirement to address the contamination,” Madonna said. “It takes time for the regulations to be established, a lot of science has to happen, the public has to comment. Every water supplier is under a legal duty to meet the MCL,” he said, referring to a Maximum Contaminant Limit that the DEP has set for the three chemicals — PFNA, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) and perfluorooctane sulfonic acid (PFOS).

But the standards have not always been met, according to the complaint filed by Camden.

“As a result of the use of defendants’ Fluorochemical Products for their intended purpose, PFOS, PFOA, and/or their chemical precursors have been detected in Plaintiff’s contaminated wells at levels exceeding New Jersey’s maximum contamination level,” the suit says.

New Jersey has some of the nation’s highest levels of PFAS contamination because of its long industrial history and, until recently, lax regulation. In 2014, the DEP published its own PFAS study from data gathered in 2009 and 2010, finding that two-thirds of samples taken from 31 municipal water systems contained the chemicals.

When did they know about danger?

In the Hopatcong suit, the plaintiffs say 3M knew since the 1950s that its PFAS products were harmful to human beings and would contaminate the environment. But it continued to make, sell and distribute the products to its clients in New Jersey and elsewhere until 2000, when it began to phase out its products containing PFOA and PFOS in response to pressure from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The EPA said at the time that PFOS appears to combine persistence, bioaccumulation and toxicity, “to an extraordinary degree,” while 3M continued to assert that its products are safe, the suit says.

In a statement to NJ Spotlight News on Thursday, the company defended its handling of PFAS.

“3M acted responsibly in connection with products containing PFAS and will vigorously defend our record of environmental stewardship,” the statement said.

Chemours, a DuPont spinoff that’s also named as a defendant in two of the suits, did not respond to a request for comment.

Madonna said the New Jersey suits are among a national wave of litigation against PFAS manufacturers brought by about 50 water suppliers. He said 3M has recently settled with two public water suppliers in Michigan and Minnesota but that is not necessarily a guide to the outcome of the New Jersey cases.

“3M sees the writing on the wall and they realize that they’re responsible for this contamination,” he said.

Editor’s Note: This story has been updated, deleting a comment from a plaintiff’s attorney and clarifying the position on water standards.

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