BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Squankum

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Squankum, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Squankum, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Squankum, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Squankum, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Squankum, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Squankum, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Squankum

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Squankum:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Squankum, NJ

Latest News in Squankum, NJ

Buttzville? Quibbletown? N.J.’s weird town names and where they came from

There’s really no kind way to say this, so we’re just going to come out with it: What were our Jersey forefathers thinking when they dubbed Buttzville Buttzville? Well, it was named after the founder, Michael Robert Buttz; and that poor guy had to go through life with the initials M. R. Buttz (say it fast with a twang, and you’ll feel his pain). Clearly they had to flip a wooden nickel to choose from all the possibilities: Buttztown, Buttzland, Buttzberg … and it’s tails for Buttzville! (Oh, the puns a...

There’s really no kind way to say this, so we’re just going to come out with it: What were our Jersey forefathers thinking when they dubbed Buttzville Buttzville? Well, it was named after the founder, Michael Robert Buttz; and that poor guy had to go through life with the initials M. R. Buttz (say it fast with a twang, and you’ll feel his pain). Clearly they had to flip a wooden nickel to choose from all the possibilities: Buttztown, Buttzland, Buttzberg … and it’s tails for Buttzville! (Oh, the puns are bottomless!)

All in jest, of course; but the fact remains that New Jersey doesn’t lack for towns with peculiar names. Let’s explore.

Ho-Ho-Kus (pronounced hoHOkus)

With a name that sounds as if it might conjure a spell, this cozy residential town may be a magical place to live; but there’s no hocus-pocus to the story of Ho-Ho-Kus. Despite a bit of a ru-ru-ckus over how the name came to be, the widely held belief is that it’s contracted from the Delaware Indian term Mah-Ho-Ho-Kus, which means “the red cedar.” Ho-hum.

Photo by John | Flickr

Hi-Nella (pronounced like it’s spelled)

A town that sounds like a neighborly greeting on a Mayberry lane, Hi-Nella is a blink of a borough snipped from the now-defunct township of Clementon back in 1929. Less than 1,000 people live in this tiny town whose name is either derived from the Native American term for “high ground” or is a tribute to the coincidentally christened Nella, wife to the developer of Hi-Nella estates. In response to New Jersey’s push to merge smaller towns with larger municipalities to “ease tax burdens,” the borough’s officials resist — leaving the state’s task force with little more to say than, “Bye-Nella.” For now.

Photo courtesy of NJ Advance Media

Moonachie (pronounced moo-NAH-key)

If you’re from New Jersey, you know the key to pronouncing “Moonachie” is getting un-hooked on phonics — that “ch” can’t fool you, and you know on which syllable the emphasis goes! Moonachie is one of those fun words to say, like “lollygag” and “snickerdoodle;” but the backstory, though interesting, is rather bland. It’s named for the Iroquois Chief Monaghie, who lived in the cedar forests in the 1600’s. That’s it. If only Moonachie were right next to Buttzville … now that would be fun!

Photo by E. Kalish | Flickr

Succasunna (pronounced suck-uh-sun-uh)

Another entry on the “Fun to Say” list (unless you’re Sylvester the Cat) is Succasunna. Once known as Suckasunny (just try to say that without smiling), its name comes from the Lenni-Lenapi term for “land of black stones” because of the abundant iron ore found there in the early 1700s. Isn’t it IRONic?

Photo courtesy of NJ Advance Media

Shamong (pronounced sha-mawng)

Well, “shamong” us for poking fun when we have a town right here that can toot its own horn. The name literally means “place of the horn” because of the abundance of deer that supplied food and clothing for centuries of Native Americans. Not only is Shamong home to the first and last Indian reservation in the state, it’s also home to one of the most heartwarming roadside attractions in Jersey: Mighty Joe the Gorilla, a go-kart mascot salvaged and restored to stand as a memorial to the owner’s son at Mighty Joe’s Gas, Grill and Deli on Route 206.

Photo by Vicky Vinch

Harvey Cedars and Loveladies (pronounced like they’re spelled)

These neighboring towns shore have made a name for themselves on Long Beach Island, luring beachgoers to recreate by the sea for so long that the names sound less and less peculiar. And while there is no man named Harvey Cedars — the name evolved from its original designation as Harvest Quarters — there was a man called Lovelady. Thomas Lovelady, a sportsman who loved hunting, and perhaps ladies, too.

Photo courtesy of Wikimedia Commons

Quibbletown (pronounced like it’s spelled)

Including Quibbletown on this list leaves room for debate. Technically, this 18th century settlement is today an unincorporated community in Piscataway called New Market; but a park and middle school still bear the original argumentative name. Quibbletown is unusually descriptive, reflecting the dispute among different religious denominations as to when to celebrate the Sabbath: Saturday or Sunday. With a little grace, they might have compromised and simply called it Sabbathtown.

Photo courtesy of NJ Advance Media

Tavistock (pronounced like it’s spelled)

Tavistock is what happens when people come together for a good cause. You know, like golf. Increasingly teed off by the blue laws prohibiting them from playing the game on Sundays, members of the Haddon Country Club put on their big boy knickers and set off on a new course; that is, they built an entirely new one. One club member had recently acquired the Tavistock estate, and he offered part of it to carve out 18 new holes. Ultimately, the estate and its new golf club seceded from the oppressive borough of Haddonfield, dropping the blue laws in the process. Today, this tract of land measuring less than three-tenths of a square mile is home to approximately five people and the Tavistock Country Club; and its name remains on par with its original designation — a nod to the English hometown of its founder.

Photo by Betsy Kiesling

Honorable Mentions

Thanks to Native Americans, explorers and early settlers, the list of Jersey’s quirky town names is far from finished. And while we poke good-natured fun at these curious designations, we must also make mention of the fact that each one honors a person, family, tribe or language that came before us. It’s legacy. No ifs, ands or Buttz.

N.J. measles outbreak spreads to 4th county, now up to 11 cases. Here’s all the spots in latest health alert.

The measles outbreak in New Jersey has spread to a second county and the number of confirmed cases this year has climbed to 11 as health officials nationally continue to express concerns about the rapid rise in infections.Seven of the cases are in Ocean County with two more in Monmouth County, health officials said. Two other cases were reported previously in ...

The measles outbreak in New Jersey has spread to a second county and the number of confirmed cases this year has climbed to 11 as health officials nationally continue to express concerns about the rapid rise in infections.

Seven of the cases are in Ocean County with two more in Monmouth County, health officials said. Two other cases were reported previously in Bergen and Essex counties.

Health officials have listed a dozen locations including Newark Airport, Monmouth Medical Center and locations around Lakewood where people could have been exposed to measles.

An unidentified “adult male from Ocean County” visited locations in Lakewood’s houses of worship, a wedding venue and yeshiva while infected with measles between March 9 and March 14 and may have exposed others, according to the New Jersey Department of Health. The state declared an outbreak on March 15.

The most recent outbreak is the second in the state over the past six months. The first outbreak sickened 33 people in Ocean and Passaic counties starting in October before it was declared over in January.

The continued spread in New Jersey comes as national cases of measles through the first three months of 2019 has already exceeded last year’s total, according to the Centers for Disease Control. There have been 387 cases through March 28, the CDC reported.

Officials in Rockland County, New York, just north of Bergen County, have banned unvaccinated minors from public places as they attempt to fight a measles outbreak that has infected more than 150 people since October. The county is experiencing New York state’s longest measles outbreak since the disease was officially eliminated from the United States in 2000. Health officials say the best way to stop the disease’s spread is a high vaccination rate in the community.

A federal judge last month denied a request from parents to let 44 unvaccinated children return to the Waldorf School in Rockland County.

People can become ill from measles from 5 to 21 days after being exposed to the virus. Measles symptoms vary, but can include high fever, cough, runny nose, red, watery eyes and a rash.

If contracted, the virus can result in ear infections, pneumonia, swelling of the brain, miscarriage in pregnant women, and even death, particularly for children, according to health officials.

For every 1,000 children who get measles, one or two will die.

If you received the two recommended doses of the measles vaccine as a child, you are considered protected for life and do not need a booster, according to the CDC.

Anyone who visited the following locations may have been exposed to measles:

Have a tip? Tell us. nj.com/tips

Get the latest updates right in your inbox. Subscribe to NJ.com’s newsletters.

Howell development: Commercial plaza near Middle School North, warehouses in Ramtown?

Brookstone at Casola Farm LLC's application to develop a commercial flex space complex on Squankum Yellowbrook Road was postponed to an as-yet undetermined date.Testimony began on 366 Ramtown Greenville Road LLC's proposal to enlarge a warehouse facility in Ramtown but was continued to June 28.ORIGINAL STORY:HOWELL — Two developers, one looking to build a commercial plaza outside Farmingdale and ...

Brookstone at Casola Farm LLC's application to develop a commercial flex space complex on Squankum Yellowbrook Road was postponed to an as-yet undetermined date.

Testimony began on 366 Ramtown Greenville Road LLC's proposal to enlarge a warehouse facility in Ramtown but was continued to June 28.

ORIGINAL STORY:

HOWELL — Two developers, one looking to build a commercial plaza outside Farmingdale and another seeking to expand warehouses in Ramtown, will make their pitches to the Zoning Board of Adjustment Monday evening.

Developer Brookstone at Casola Farm LLC and landowners James and Patricia Casey are proposing 30 units of "multitenant flex" space, which typically comprises a mix of office and warehouse space, at 526 Squankum Yellowbrook Road.

The office plaza would sit up Squankum Yellowbrook Road from Howell Middle School North and Howell High School. The parcel sits just to the west of where Farmingdale is carved out of Howell, with a mix of businesses, residential developments and industrial parcels nearby.

Although earlier plans called for more storefronts, the current proposal is for 30 units spread between two buildings, one with 24 tenant spaces and the other with six. All in all the plans call for 49,500 square feet of commercial space, plus a 30-foot-wide driveway and 96 parking spaces.

The neighborhood could accommodate 13,072 square feet of office space and 57,650 square feet of warehouse space at the proposed location "without having an adverse or detrimental impact on traffic conditions in the area," according to an analysis by traffic engineering consultants McDonough & Rea Associates Inc.

The proposal would require a variance sits the proposed development site sits mostly in an agricultural and residential zone, although the northeastern side, near the border with Farmingdale, crosses into a special economic development zone.

The other development up for discussion Monday is a 45,973-square-foot warehouse proposal in the Ramtown neighborhood. The Fishing Line LLC also wants to build out 9,402 square feet of offices. The proposal would triple the warehouse space already on the site. As with the other proposal, the parcel sits in an agricultural and residential zone.

The proposed site, 366 Ramtown Greenville Road, sits among mostly farmland, with residential neighborhoods further to the east and west.

The board is scheduled to meet at 7 p.m. Monday via the Zoom videoconferencing application.

Alex N. Gecan: 732-547-1365; [email protected]; @GeeksterTweets

NJ history of Reeveytown: Monmouth County dump neighborhood's picture-perfect past

TINTON FALLS - Before the stench of the landfill made life unbearable for many who live near Shafto Road, the Reeveytown section of town was a haven, a place of wild blueberry bushes and peastone crossroads.Most of what is Reeveytown lies between the narrow-upstream portion of the Shark River and Asbury Avenue. In the 1970s and 1980s, M...

TINTON FALLS - Before the stench of the landfill made life unbearable for many who live near Shafto Road, the Reeveytown section of town was a haven, a place of wild blueberry bushes and peastone crossroads.

Most of what is Reeveytown lies between the narrow-upstream portion of the Shark River and Asbury Avenue. In the 1970s and 1980s, Monmouth County acquired 900 acres of the land by eminent domain to make the landfill.

The people who lived there or who have relatives there have not forgotten.

"It was a shame to take such good property and make it into a dump," said Claire Garland, director of the Sand Hill Indian Historical Association and a descendant of Cherokees who moved to the area in the late 18th century.

The Monmouth County Reclamation Center, as the dump is formally known, is the subject of complaints from neighbors, who have threatened a $233 million class-action lawsuit against Monmouth County over the odors emanating from the site. County officials have pledged to fix the problem.

The name Reeveytown derives from Native Americans and African-Americans, whose surnames Reavy, Revy, Rebee, Revey, Reevey and Richardson start to show up on the tax list dating back to the 1780s, Garland said.

In the late 1700s, the Cherokee Richardsons migrated from Georgia to New Jersey to live with their Lenape cousins, the Reveys.

The Reeveys were African-Americans who established the Reeveytown A.M.E.Zion Church in 1882.

"It was mostly just dirt lanes back there and it was possible to go blueberry picking. People had farms and raised pigs," Garland said of the land the county took for the dump.

One of the dirt lanes connected to Squankum Road, where there is an Indian burial ground. The burial is part of Pine Brook Cemetery today and is the property of the St. Thomas A.M.E. Zion Church.

One of the oldest plots is that of Richard P. Revey, who was born in 1784 and was the father of Elizabeth Revey, who married Isaac R. Richardson in 1844.

At one time 854 landfills operated in New Jersey, many of them private. However, in the 1970s the state created the Department of Environmental Protection and made new regulations for solid waste management.

That led to the closure of almost all the landfills.

The counties were then required to handle their own garbage and from the middle of the 1970s to the late 1980s, Monmouth County officials came knocking on the doors of Reeveytown residents.

"We got a telephone call in 1986 that we were going to get certified letters in the mail that we were going to be condemned," Geraldine "Jake" McCarthy said.

McCarthy said her parents Calvin and Belle Theobold lived in Kearny and bought their 33-acre property at 2955 Shafto Road in the 1950s. They used it as a weekend getaway and summer house for their 10 children.

Their wood cabin home sat on a hill that was 160 feet above sea level. The family made improvements over time, adding a skate shed by a pond, a tennis court, swimming pool and driveway.

"It was a haven back there. We rode our horses through the trials. There were peastone crossroads. They took the land from us, but not the memories," McCarthy said.

McCarthy said her family fought eminent domain for five years and took the county to court. Her mother was a judge general advocate in World War II and studied the case law.

The Theobolds lost the battle for their property but their legal fight got them more money for the land than the $10,000 per acre the county originally offered.

In 1991, the family picked up their house by its foundation and moved it across the street to 2978 Shafto Road, where it still stands today — though under new ownership. See the house in the above photo gallery. It still has its original peastone fireplace. The siding however, is a newer renovation

The driveway to their old property at 2955 Shafto Road is still visible but is fenced off.

More: Monmouth County plans $7.5M to fix stinky landfill. Stay with APP.com for more, or, better yet, subscribe today.

The eminent domain fight launched McCarthy's career in real estate. She was in college at Farleigh Dickinson University at the time and started taking real estate classes. Today she owns Theobold Properties and lives in Shrewsbury.

"This whole thing sparked my career. I wanted to know why? I wanted to know the laws on it. I wanted to how someone can just come along and take your property," McCarthy said.

In 1994, the Reeveytown A.M.E. Zion's white shingled church with its red front door that was built in 1882 was demolished to make room for the expansion of the landfill, according to the church. The group has relocated up the road to 2505 Shafto Road.

Garland, who lives in Middletown, said many of her relatives couldn't afford to fight eminent domain and took what the county offered them for their land. Some of them still remain in the area and live on nearby Wardell Street.

"It's really caused a lot of problems because of the stench leaking from the landfill has made it difficult to go out on their properties. The stench has taken over," Garland said.

Monmouth County officials will provide an update on the current work being performed at the landfill. The public meeting is at 7 p.m. May 13, at the Tinton Falls Municipal Building.

When Jersey Shore native Dan Radel is not reporting on the news you can find him in a college classroom where he is a history professor. Reach him @danielradelapp; 732-643-4072; [email protected]

You Know You’re From Howell When…

There are people who are from Howell and then there are people who are Howell. When I asked a group from Howell what characteristics, qualities, and traits belong on this list, the detail was amazing! From decades ago to the current day.What's missing from the list? Let me know! [email protected] 15 Hardest Town Names To Pronounce In New JerseyALLAMUCHYThis small town in Warren County is pronoun...

There are people who are from Howell and then there are people who are Howell. When I asked a group from Howell what characteristics, qualities, and traits belong on this list, the detail was amazing! From decades ago to the current day.

What's missing from the list? Let me know! [email protected].

The 15 Hardest Town Names To Pronounce In New Jersey

ALLAMUCHY

This small town in Warren County is pronounced AL-UH-MOOCHIE. The township's name comes from the Native American word "Allamachetey," meaning "place within the hills."

BERNARDSVILLE

Part of Somerset's Bernards Township, Bernardsville is often mispronounced as "Bern-ARDS-ville" as opposed to the correct pronunciation "BERN-ards-ville."

BOONTON

My father grew up in BOO-in. If you ask anyone that live there, that is how it's said. The 'n' mysteriously disappears. I have rarely heard BOON-TON.

BUENA

Seems easy enought, right? This Atlantic County town is pronounced BUNA with a long 'u.' The town gets it's name from Buena Vista Township, which was named for the 1847 Battle of Buena Vista during the Mexican–American War.

DUNELLEN

Is it DUH-nel-EN? No. It's actually Duh-NEL-IN according to most locals. If you're a a lifer, it's more like duhNEL'n. It all blends together.

FORKED RIVER

This is a Jersey Shore classic. Every new visitor to this Ocean County town is puzzled as to why Forked is pronounced FORK-ID instead of forkt. I've lived in the area my entire life, and I honestly don't have an answer.

GLOUCESTER CITY

Fun fact! Gloucester City, pronounced GLOSS-TER, ranks 9th in the country for number of Irish American residents according to the latest Cencus data.

HOLMDEL

Most call this Monmouth County town HOME-DEL. But, where did that 'L' go? Sticklers will say it's HOLE-M-DEL. It's said the town's name comes from the Dutch language words Holm and Del, meaning "pleasant valley."

HOPATCONG

HO-PAT-KONG was briefly named "Brooklyn" in 1898 before it became the hard to pronounce town we've come to love. It's said that Hopatcong, and surrounding towns would never come to be without the construction on I-80 which stretches from Teaneck, NJ all the way to San Francisco.

MANALAPAN

Often called MANA-LAPPIN jokingly, this Monmouth County town is actually pronounced MAN-AL-UH-PIN. Manalapan is a Lenape word that is said to mean "land of good bread"or "good land to settle upon."

METUCHEN

Pronounced MET-UH-CHIN, the earliest residents of the area were the Raritan people of the Lenape Native Americans, who lived in the area and traveled through it to the shore. In 1646, Chief 'Matouchin' was part of a group that included 1,200 warriors.

PEQUANNOCK

PIC-WAN-NICK may be tough to pronounce, but it's not tough to live in. The Morris County town has earned the distinction of being named one of the"Best Places to Live" in New Jersey.

RAHWAY

Is it RAH-WAY or RAW-WAY? You hear more RAW-WAYs in town and that likely due to the north Jersey accent. But, when NJ.com asked the Mayor of Rahway which is correct, he replied RAH-WAY.

SAYREVILLE

This town is tricky. Many locals pronounce it SAY-ER-VILLE. I would love to learn how that all started. If you want to be technical, the proper pronunciation is SAIR-VILLE.

SECAUCUS

Take your pick. SIC-cau-CUS or SEE-cau-CUS. Personally, I've always said SEE-cau-CUS, but I'm from what Secaucus residents would call 'South Jersey.'

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.