BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Scobeyville

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Scobeyville, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Scobeyville, NJ
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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Scobeyville, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Scobeyville, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Scobeyville, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Scobeyville, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Scobeyville

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Scobeyville:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Scobeyville, NJ

Latest News in Scobeyville, NJ

North Jersey chefs, restaurants, and food and drink businesses nominated for 2018 awards

Joseph Cuccia of 17 Summer, Peter Loria of Café Matisse, Ariane Duarte of Ariane Kitchen & Bar, Fattal's Syrian Bakery and Chakra are among the 42 North Jersey chefs, restaurants and food and drink businesses nominated for a 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.This is the second year for the Garden State Culinary Arts awards that honor New Jersey's restaurants, chefs, farmers, food artisans and markets and professionals in the beer, wine and spirits industries.An independent voting body that include...

Joseph Cuccia of 17 Summer, Peter Loria of Café Matisse, Ariane Duarte of Ariane Kitchen & Bar, Fattal's Syrian Bakery and Chakra are among the 42 North Jersey chefs, restaurants and food and drink businesses nominated for a 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.

This is the second year for the Garden State Culinary Arts awards that honor New Jersey's restaurants, chefs, farmers, food artisans and markets and professionals in the beer, wine and spirits industries.

An independent voting body that includes some 150 food writers (including this writer) and critics, members of the Garden State Awards Committee and winners of the 2017 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards will begin casting votes today for the awards that will honor New Jersey's restaurants and chefs; farmers, food artisans and markets; and professionals in the beer, wine and spirits industries.

The top-three vote-getters in each of the 15 awards categories will be named finalists in their respective categories, and a second round of voting will determine the winner.

The winners will be announced and awards given out at a gala ceremony and reception on Sunday, April 29 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at BellWorks in Holmdel. A limited number of tickets will go on sale next week for the gala.

For for updates, visit the GSCAA Facebook page

The following are are the categories and nominees for the 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards (North Jersey nominees are at the top of each category and in bold):

Best Restaurant

A restaurant in operation in New Jersey for at least five years that displays overall excellence and consistency of quality in food, atmosphere and service, and has set high standards in the industry.

Best New Restaurant

A restaurant opened in the previous calendar year (2017) that displays excellence in food and service, already has established a distinctive voice, and promises to set high standards for years to come.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: North

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Morris, Passaic, Sussex, Union or Warren counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean or Somerset counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: South

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester or Salem counties.

Best Food Market

An established, independently owned, retail food market in New Jersey that demonstrates a high level of quality in goods offered, service to its customers and devotion to its community. Must have been in operation for at least five years.

Outstanding Chef

A chef working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least five consecutive years whose accomplishments have served to inspire, educate and set standards in both the state and the industry.

Rising Star Chef

A chef age 30 or younger as of the previous calendar year (2017) whose accomplishments and talent already have served to inspire and impress and promise to set standards for years to come. Must have worked in a professional capacity as a chef for a minimum of three years, including the two most recent years in New Jersey.

Outstanding Pastry Chef/Baker

A pastry chef or baker working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least three years in a restaurant, café, bakery or other public outlet who has displayed overall excellence in pastries, desserts and/or bread-making.

Outstanding Beer Professional

A beer professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Wine Professional

A wine professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Spirits Professional

A spirits professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Food Artisan

A food artisan working in New Jersey who has demonstrated significant talent and skill in their chosen genre and has set new or consistent standards of achievement and excellence. Must have been working in the genre for at least three years.

Outstanding Farmer

A farmer working in New Jersey whose primary income is derived from agricultural pursuits, has demonstrated significant talent and skill in the profession, and has set consistent standards of excellence. Must have been working as a farmer for at least five years.

Garden State Culinary Legend

A food professional with a rich, storied history of high standards, commitment, accomplishment and influence. The contributions of the person to the culinary arts in New Jersey must have affected residents in positive ways for at least 10 years.

Mart Pretzel Bakery Nominated For Garden State Culinary Award

The Cinnaminson-based bakery owned by Julia Fraser is nominated in the category of Outstanding Food Artisan. CINNAMINSON, NJ — Mart Pretzel Bakery in Cinnaminson has been nominated for a 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Award. The bakery, owned by Julia Fraser, is nominated in the category of Outstanding Food Artisan.The Outstanding Food Artisan award goes to a food artisan working in New Jersey who has demonstrated significant talent and skill in their chosen genre and has set new or consistent standards of achievement ...

The Cinnaminson-based bakery owned by Julia Fraser is nominated in the category of Outstanding Food Artisan.

CINNAMINSON, NJ — Mart Pretzel Bakery in Cinnaminson has been nominated for a 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Award. The bakery, owned by Julia Fraser, is nominated in the category of Outstanding Food Artisan.

The Outstanding Food Artisan award goes to a food artisan working in New Jersey who has demonstrated significant talent and skill in their chosen genre and has set new or consistent standards of achievement and excellence. They must have been working in the genre for at least three years.

The awards will be given out by the newly formed nonprofit organization, the Garden State Culinary Arts Foundation, which owns and oversees the comprehensive statewide awards program.

About 150 food writers and critics, members of the Garden State Awards Committee and winners of the 2017 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards will vote for the awards that will honor New Jersey's restaurants and chefs; farmers, food artisans and markets; and professionals in the beer, wine and spirits industries.

The top-three vote-getters in each of the 15 awards categories will be named finalists in their respective categories, and a second round of voting will determine the winner.

The winners will be announced and awards given out at a gala ceremony and reception on Sunday, April 29 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at BellWorks in Holmdel. A limited number of tickets will go on sale next week for the gala.

Here is the full list of categories and nominees for the 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards:

Best RestaurantA restaurant in operation in New Jersey for at least five years that displays overall excellence and consistency of quality in food, atmosphere and service, and has set high standards in the industry.

Best New Restaurant

A restaurant opened in the previous calendar year (2017) that displays excellence in food and service, already has established a distinctive voice, and promises to set high standards for years to come.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: NorthAn informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Morris, Passaic, Sussex, Union or Warren counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: CentralAn informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean or Somerset counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: SouthAn informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester or Salem counties.

Best Food MarketAn established, independently owned, retail food market in New Jersey that demonstrates a high level of quality in goods offered, service to its customers and devotion to its community. Must have been in operation for at least five years.

Outstanding ChefA chef working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least five consecutive years whose accomplishments have served to inspire, educate and set standards in both the state and the industry.

Rising Star ChefA chef age 30 or younger as of the previous calendar year (2017) whose accomplishments and talent already have served to inspire and impress and promise to set standards for years to come. Must have worked in a professional capacity as a chef for a minimum of three years, including the two most recent years in New Jersey.

Outstanding Pastry Chef/BakerA pastry chef or baker working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least three years in a restaurant, café, bakery or other public outlet who has displayed overall excellence in pastries, desserts and/or bread-making.

Outstanding Beer ProfessionalA beer professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Wine ProfessionalA wine professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Spirits ProfessionalA spirits professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Food ArtisanA food artisan working in New Jersey who has demonstrated significant talent and skill in their chosen genre and has set new or consistent standards of achievement and excellence. Must have been working in the genre for at least three years.

Outstanding FarmerA farmer working in New Jersey whose primary income is derived from agricultural pursuits, has demonstrated significant talent and skill in the profession, and has set consistent standards of excellence. Must have been working as a farmer for at least five years.

Garden State Culinary LegendA food professional with a rich, storied history of high standards, commitment, accomplishment and influence. The contributions of the person to the culinary arts in New Jersey must have affected residents in positive ways for at least 10 years.

Image via Shutterstock

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Uncle Vinnie's Clam Bar Up Nominated For Culinary Award

The Pluckemin Inn in Bedminster and Project P.U.B. and Shumi in Somerville are also nominated for 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.RARITAN, NJ — Uncle Vinnie's Clam Bar in Raritan was among several Somerset County local restaurants to be nominated for the 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.Uncle Vinnie's Clam Bar in Raritan and was nominated for Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central.Also in Somerset County, Shumi in Somerville is also nominated for Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central. ...

The Pluckemin Inn in Bedminster and Project P.U.B. and Shumi in Somerville are also nominated for 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.

RARITAN, NJ — Uncle Vinnie's Clam Bar in Raritan was among several Somerset County local restaurants to be nominated for the 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards.

Uncle Vinnie's Clam Bar in Raritan and was nominated for Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central.

Also in Somerset County, Shumi in Somerville is also nominated for Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central. Project P.U.B. in Somerville was nominated for Best New Restaurant.

And the Pluckemin Inn was nominated for Best Restaurant along with Chris Cree who works at the restaurant, who is up for Outstanding Wine Professional.

The awards will be given out by the newly formed nonprofit organization, the Garden State Culinary Arts Foundation, which owns and oversees the comprehensive statewide awards program.

About 150 food writers and critics, members of the Garden State Awards Committee and winners of the 2017 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards will vote for the awards that will honor New Jersey's restaurants and chefs; farmers, food artisans and markets; and professionals in the beer, wine and spirits industries.

The top-three vote-getters in each of the 15 awards categories will be named finalists in their respective categories, and a second round of voting will determine the winner.

The winners will be announced and awards given out at a gala ceremony and reception on Sunday, April 29 from 5:30 to 9 p.m. at BellWorks in Holmdel. A limited number of tickets will go on sale next week for the gala.

Here is the full list of categories and nominees for the 2018 Garden State Culinary Arts Awards:

Best Restaurant

A restaurant in operation in New Jersey for at least five years that displays overall excellence and consistency of quality in food, atmosphere and service, and has set high standards in the industry.

Best New Restaurant

A restaurant opened in the previous calendar year (2017) that displays excellence in food and service, already has established a distinctive voice, and promises to set high standards for years to come.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: North

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Bergen, Essex, Hudson, Morris, Passaic, Sussex, Union or Warren counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: Central

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Hunterdon, Mercer, Middlesex, Monmouth, Ocean or Somerset counties.

Best Neighborhood Food Establishment: South

An informal, moderately priced, independently owned eatery with high-quality food that reflects the character of New Jersey and/or its surrounding community. Must have been in operation for at least five years in Atlantic, Burlington, Camden, Cape May, Cumberland, Gloucester or Salem counties.

Best Food Market

An established, independently owned, retail food market in New Jersey that demonstrates a high level of quality in goods offered, service to its customers and devotion to its community. Must have been in operation for at least five years.

Outstanding Chef

A chef working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least five consecutive years whose accomplishments have served to inspire, educate and set standards in both the state and the industry.

Rising Star Chef

A chef age 30 or younger as of the previous calendar year (2017) whose accomplishments and talent already have served to inspire and impress and promise to set standards for years to come. Must have worked in a professional capacity as a chef for a minimum of three years, including the two most recent years in New Jersey.

Outstanding Pastry Chef/Baker

A pastry chef or baker working in a professional capacity in New Jersey for at least three years in a restaurant, café, bakery or other public outlet who has displayed overall excellence in pastries, desserts and/or bread-making.

Outstanding Beer Professional

A beer professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Wine Professional

A wine professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Spirits Professional

A spirits professional working in New Jersey who has proven skills and talent and has had a significant positive effect on the industry.

Outstanding Food Artisan

A food artisan working in New Jersey who has demonstrated significant talent and skill in their chosen genre and has set new or consistent standards of achievement and excellence. Must have been working in the genre for at least three years.

Outstanding Farmer

A farmer working in New Jersey whose primary income is derived from agricultural pursuits, has demonstrated significant talent and skill in the profession, and has set consistent standards of excellence. Must have been working as a farmer for at least five years.

Garden State Culinary Legend

A food professional with a rich, storied history of high standards, commitment, accomplishment and influence. The contributions of the person to the culinary arts in New Jersey must have affected residents in positive ways for at least 10 years.

(Image via Shutterstock)

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Vodka and gin flow at Asbury Park Distilling

There’s a new player in the Jersey Shore’s cocktail culture scene: Asbury Park Distilling, crafting Jersey fresh spirits right on Lake Avenue.The distillery and tasting room, which opened on Memorial Day weekend, is already attracting a local following as it contributes to a New Jersey tradition dating back centuries.“Really, the first distillery in the United States of America was located right here in New Jersey,” said co-owner Zack Ohebshalom of Fort Lee.PARTY TIME: ...

There’s a new player in the Jersey Shore’s cocktail culture scene: Asbury Park Distilling, crafting Jersey fresh spirits right on Lake Avenue.

The distillery and tasting room, which opened on Memorial Day weekend, is already attracting a local following as it contributes to a New Jersey tradition dating back centuries.

“Really, the first distillery in the United States of America was located right here in New Jersey,” said co-owner Zack Ohebshalom of Fort Lee.

PARTY TIME: P!nk, The Who and Future playing Atlantic City

Indeed, Laird and Company, producers of Applejack brandy and based in the Scobeyville section of Colts Neck, was established in 1780.

New Jersey’s new craft distillery legislation went into effect in December 2013, and the change in the law opened the door to a potential spirits boom similar to the surge in local beer business following the passing of a 2012 law regulating breweries.

“We are the sixteenth (distillery to open) since 2013’s passing of the craft distillery law,” Ohebshalom said. “However, we’re the first in the state located in a commercial downtown area, which is really important. So we have a ton of foot traffic, people come in to see what we’re all about and learn a little bit about the process.”

Asbury Park Distilling is the collective vision of six co-owners – including Ohebshalom, Rob Wile of Rumson and Andrew Karas of Ridgewood – and serves as a fine showcase for the skills of master distiller Bill Tambussi and bartender John Peet.

FUNNY MAN: Craig Ferguson brings 'New Deal' tour to Red Bank

The company currently offers gin and vodka, with future offerings expected to include barrel-aged gin in August and whiskey in the fall. At the Lake Avenue headquarters, the spirits are available to purchase by the bottle ($30) and to taste in a wide variety of artisanal cocktails. Tastings are $5, cocktails range from $10 to $12, and a tasting and cocktail pairing is $15.

(For an inside look at the distillery and their cocktail bar, check out the video of Asbury Park Distilling by videographer Brian Johnston on app.com.)

It’s a rare privilege to step into a bar and see it stocked entirely with spirits made just steps away from where you’re drinking — but that has to be the case at a craft distillery tasting room such as the one at Asbury Park Distilling.

“It calls from a great amount of creativity from our bar staff,” Wile said, citing the work of Peet and company.

Cocktails available include the Bartender’s Breakfast (Asbury Vodka with cold brew coffee from Café Volan on Bangs Avenue, plus orange poblano syrup), the No. 64 (Asbury Gin with orange juice, lemongrass, coconut, chai and sumac) and the Tambussi Family Tonic (Asbury Gin with lemon, orange, coriander tonic syrup and thyme).

“It makes us unique, it makes us different and the people come in, they get a great cocktail experience knowing they’re only getting the spirits we make here as well as what we make behind the bar,” Wile said. “We are not legally allowed to bring in any other alcohol into the space so our bitters program, any plays on vermouth or anything like that, we have to make on site, and again it’s a really, really creative process.”

“We want to really revolutionize the cocktail industry here in Asbury Park,” Obeshalom said. “There are a lot of really tremendous, tremendous bars (with) great beverage programs (in town), but what we’re doing here is a little unique, because we’re only utilizing spirits that we’re manufacturing on the premises here. That’s a really important component of this as well.”

Drink up

Here are just a few of the other craft distilleries making a name for themselves on the local spirits scene:

Jon Stewart Farm Plans Delayed

COLTS NECK – Entertainer Jon Stewart and his wife, Tracey, began their application before the township Planning Board to develop a Route 537 farm into an agriculture sanctuary-education center, but quickly hit a bump in the road. Shortly after the hearing opened Thursday, Nov. 10, lawyer Timothy E. Corriston – representing Marilyn and James Cracchiolo of Scobeyville Drive, adjoining neighbors of the Stewarts’ Hockhockson Farm – raised concerns about hours of operation, lighting and landscaping. The Cracchiolos also qu...

COLTS NECK – Entertainer Jon Stewart and his wife, Tracey, began their application before the township Planning Board to develop a Route 537 farm into an agriculture sanctuary-education center, but quickly hit a bump in the road. Shortly after the hearing opened Thursday, Nov. 10, lawyer Timothy E. Corriston – representing Marilyn and James Cracchiolo of Scobeyville Drive, adjoining neighbors of the Stewarts’ Hockhockson Farm – raised concerns about hours of operation, lighting and landscaping. The Cracchiolos also questioned whether the Stewarts should be before the township Zoning Board of Adjustment seeking variances from the agriculture zone in which the farm sits. A visitor-education center, which the Stewarts propose, does not comply with the zoning, for example. But the Monmouth County Agriculture Development Board OKed the center earlier this year, said John B. Anderson III, a lawyer for the Stewarts. The Stewarts, along with Timothy Anfuso, the township planner and zoning officer, say the Planning Board is the correct board to hear the Stewarts’ site plan application.

“We’re not trying to stop the project,” Marilyn Corriston said. “We’re trying to work it out (with the Stewarts).” Jon and Philip E. San Filippo, another lawyer for the Stewarts, agreed both sides are looking for a solution to any differences. “We’re disappointed in the delay,” Jon told the Planning Board, but “we want to be responsible and responsive neighbors.” “I would like to work this out, as well,” Marilyn told the Planning Board. The Planning Board adjourned the hearing to Dec. 13. The meeting, which included a break, lasted less than an hour. The adjournment gives the Stewarts and Cracchiolos time to resolve any issues, while the Cracchiolos can file an appeal to the Zoning Board to hear the case or split the case between the two boards – variances before the Zoners and site plan before the Planners. If no appeal is filed, the application stays before the Planning Board, Anfuso said. Tracey Stewart declined comment after the Planning Board meeting, but Jon said it was unclear how this delay would affect an opening of the farm sanctuary-education center to the public. “We want it to be a big asset to the community,” Jon said. “We had our presentation ready to go. Obviously, we want to be as responsive as we can.” Tracey had previously said she hoped to get the center operating in the spring. Plans – technically filed by FSP, a limited licensed partnership doing business as JTS Land Trust and Hockhockson Farm – for the 45-acre farm between Laird and Swimming River roads include building an 8,436-square-foot, two-story visitor and education center at the middle of the property. It would include offices, classrooms, restrooms, flexible space and a gift shop.

The idea would be for the sanctuary-center to educate people on such things as an introduction to agriculture, farming history, the relationship between farm and community, gardening basics, eating well with locally grown food and food production to consumption. The center’s hours would be 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., seven days a week. School tours would be held weekdays, while adult and family activities, including classes, would be held Wednesday to Sunday. Tours of 60 to 90 minutes would be done by appointment with five to 30 guests. Classes are expected to be held with 20 to 30 attending. An after-school program would last from 4 to 6 p.m. weekdays for 10 to 25 children. The daily number of visitors would be limited to 150, including those using the after-school program. Special events, such as lectures and fund-raising activities accommodating up to 250 people, would be held from 6 to 10 p.m. four to six times a year. Smaller lectures for up to 100 could be held once or twice a month. Security and traffic-control for special events would be coordinated with the township. The center would have 60 parking spaces and a 69-vehicle overflow area. Hockhockson Farm would have two main driveways, one for entering the property, one for exiting. A greenhouse would be built near the visitor-education center. Initially, the farm would have a steer, a cow, four pigs, three horses, 10 sheep or goats, six chickens and two turkeys. Paddocks would be on different parts of the property. Fifteen employees will work on the property, basically between 6:30 a.m. and 8 p.m. But employees or a caretaker will be on the property at all times. The farm now has a large farmhouse, which is not to be part of the public operation. The farm also has two smaller houses and 12 barns and outbuildings. The Laurino Farms farm stand and vegetable and flower growing areas are to continue on the property. Its customers will not apply to limits on public attendance. Tracey grew up on a farm and is a former veterinary technician. She is an animal advocate and the author of a book, “Do Unto Animals: A Friendly Guide to How Animals Live and How We Can Make Their Lives Better.” Jon is the former host of “The Daily Show” on the Comedy Central television network. He remains involved in TV and film work. The Stewarts live in Red Bank. Jon grew up in Central Jersey, in Mercer County. Jon seemed to be his comedian self at the Planning Board meeting. During a break, he said in an exaggerated way to an acquaintance, “This is so exciting.” And, when he addressed the planners, Jon, attending his first Planning Board meeting, joked, “For the record, this was way more dramatic and interesting than I thought it would be.”

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