BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Oceanport

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Oceanport, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Basement Leak Repair Oceanport, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Oceanport, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Oceanport

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Oceanport:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Oceanport, NJ

Latest News in Oceanport, NJ

Jersey City mayor vows hands-on approach to cash-strapped NJCU’s West Side sales plans

If New Jersey City University is going sell off pieces of its West Side campus, Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop is demanding a say in it.Fulop told NJSpotlight Thursday that he isn’t “very excited” about the financially stressed NJCU’s decision to hire the commercial real estate firm CBRE to create a plan in selling its ground leases for two parcels of its $400 million...

If New Jersey City University is going sell off pieces of its West Side campus, Jersey City Mayor Steve Fulop is demanding a say in it.

Fulop told NJSpotlight Thursday that he isn’t “very excited” about the financially stressed NJCU’s decision to hire the commercial real estate firm CBRE to create a plan in selling its ground leases for two parcels of its $400 million “campus village,” known as University Place.

The three-term mayor vowed those leases would not be sold “without Jersey City residents being a part of that.”

“What we have said to them is we have been very generous to them as a city to stimulate the investment and development necessary on NJCU’s west side campus,” Fulop said in the interview. “We are not going allow them to just sell that real estate without Jersey City taxpayers being part of that transaction and approving it.

“There is no way NJCU can fail. It is very important to Jersey City, Hudson County and immigrant families and that is their track record, so we are going to be supportive of them.”

City spokeswoman Kimberly Wallace-Scalcione did not respond to and request for comment and the mayor could not be reached.

NJCU spokesman Ira Thor said the university considers the city an integral partner as it moves forward.

“The university recognizes the critical financial assistance that the city provided regarding the University Place project,” Thor said. “While no decisions have been made at this time regarding individual real estate transactions, we certainly are committed to working closely with Mayor Fulop and his team and ensuring that the city is made whole under any scenario.”

Prior to Friday, NJCU officials have never mentioned the city’s involvement.

University Place was proposed as a project that would transform the West Side of the city — long neglected by major developers — with residential dormitory, a performing arts complex, restaurants, a supermarket and residential developments. As the owner, NJCU would offer ground leases for private developers to build and pay rent.

“When you have more students living here, more students active in the area, it energizes the streetscape,” Fulop said at a groundbreaking for the dorms in 2015. “It energizes not only the residential component, but the retail component, and we couldn’t be more excited about what this project means today and what it means for the long-term side of Jersey City.’’

Currently, University Place consists of four mixed-use apartment buildings, a dorm, and a plot of land earmarked for a supermarket.

But the project, on 22 acres between West Side Avenue and Route 440, may be one of many sacrifices the university may have to make in order to survive its current financial emergency.

A source in August told The Jersey Journal that the West Side campus is “a very valuable piece of land that can’t just become apartments.”

“But it is not going to be what NJCU wanted because they are going to have to give up an awful lot to a developer so funds come into the school. Basically, they sell the project,” the source said at the time.

The university has stated its expansion plans, exacerbated by declining enrollment, played a role in its dire financial situation. The university has also cited a reduction in state aid, the COVID-19 pandemic and initiatives to lure students with new academic programs that have underperformed.

Just Monday, NJCU’s CFO Ben Durant and University Counsel Andres Acebo told the board of trustees it was going to ask the state to pay the $30 million-plus appropriated to the school in the most recent state budget sooner to address its cash flow problem (as opposed to monthly allotments).

The request for funding upfront is part of the school’s second phase of the austerity plan that includes asking the state for an additional $35 million in American Rescue Plan funding, on top of the $10 million in additional state aid it requested in June.

“We need the money now so we can work on our rightsizing plan,” Durant said Monday. “If we don’t get our appropriation early, we can run out of cash before we develop a rightsizing plan.”

At the same meeting, school officials for the first time acknowledged that “we are looking at exiting Fort Monmouth,” its satellite campus in Oceanport, NJ. They later attempted to walk back the comments, even though “exit Fort Monmouth” was listed as No. 9 on the right-sizing plan.

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NJ casino, online, sports betting revenue up 10% in August

New Jersey’s casinos, horse tracks that offer sports betting and the online partners of both types of gambling outlets won $470.6 million from gamblers in August, up more than 10% from a year earlierATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- New Jersey’s casinos, horse tracks that offer sports betting and the online partners of both types of gambling outlets won $470.6 million from gamblers in August, up more than 10% from a year earlier, according to figures released Friday by state gambling regulators.The amount of money won from in-...

New Jersey’s casinos, horse tracks that offer sports betting and the online partners of both types of gambling outlets won $470.6 million from gamblers in August, up more than 10% from a year earlier

ATLANTIC CITY, N.J. -- New Jersey’s casinos, horse tracks that offer sports betting and the online partners of both types of gambling outlets won $470.6 million from gamblers in August, up more than 10% from a year earlier, according to figures released Friday by state gambling regulators.

The amount of money won from in-person gamblers at casinos was nearly $274 million, up 4.4% from a year earlier. But that total still lagged behind the level of August 2019, before the coronavirus pandemic hit, when the total was more than $286 million.

Returning to pre-pandemic levels for in-person gamblers has been the main goal of Atlantic City's nine casinos, regardless of the fact that money from internet and sports betting continues to grow.

Those revenue streams are misleading, casino executives say, because casinos do not get to keep all that money; it must be shared with third parties including tech platforms and sportsbooks. By some estimates, as much as 70% of internet and sports betting money is not retained by the casinos.

“It has been a great summer for Atlantic City and the region,” said James Plousis, chairman of the New Jersey Casino Control Commission. “The recent efforts to create impressive in-person experiences will continue to provide positive momentum going into the fall.”

Comparing results from the three summer months to the same period last year, Atlantic City’s casino winnings grew more than 6% and total gambling revenue exceeded $1.2 billion, up 9%, Plousis said.

Jane Bokunewicz, director of the Lloyd Levenson Institute at Stockton University, which studies the Atlantic City casino industry, called the casinos' August performance “a solid showing.”

She noted that in-person casino winnings, while trailing the pre-pandemic level of August 2019, still exceeded every other August since 2015.

“The relatively slow growth of brick-and-mortar gaming revenues compared to the increasing contribution of internet gaming to total revenue could potentially suggest a change in consumer behavior that doesn’t cannibalize in-person gaming but includes significant internet gaming activity,” she said. “A decreased reliance on exclusively in-person gaming activity has the potential to keep the New Jersey casino industry competitive with its neighbors and make it more resilient to market disruptions that might potentially occur in the future.”

For the month of August, five of the nine casinos reported increases in the amount of money won compared to a year earlier. They are: Borgata ($120.7 million, up over 29%); Hard Rock (nearly $54 million, up 2.8%); the Ocean Casino Resort (nearly $40 million, up nearly 14%); Bally's (just over $20 million, up nearly 30%); and Resorts ($18.7 million, up 0.2%).

Four casinos reported revenue declines compared with a year earlier. They are: Golden Nugget ($44.5 million, down 2.7%); Tropicana ($35.1 million, down 7.8%); Harrah's (just over $25 million, down 10.4%); and Caesars (just over $22 million, down nearly 13%).

The Borgata had its second-best month ever in August, trailing only the $124 million it won from gamblers in July. Both those figures represent the highest totals ever achieved by an Atlantic City casino since legal gambling began here in 1978.

Among internet-only entities, Resorts Digital won $43.5 million, up nearly 26%, and Caesars Interactive NJ won $8.9 million, down 10%.

For the first eight months of this year, the casinos, tracks and their partners have collectively won $3.38 billion, up 13.2% from the same period last year.

The casinos and tracks took in $546.7 million worth of sports bets in August, and kept $65.2 million of that as revenue after paying off winning bets and other expenses. The Meadowlands Racetrack in East Rutherford, just outside New York City, won $33.1 million; Freehold Raceway won $2.7 million, and Monmouth Park in Oceanport, near the Jersey Shore, won $1.8 million.

Internet casino games brought in $131.4 million in August, up over 16% from a year earlier. On Wednesday, a state legislative panel indicated that New Jersey lawmakers are prepared to extend authorization for online gambling in the state for another 10 years, through 2033.

Follow Wayne Parry on Twitter: @WayneParryAC

A dish you have to experience: Cacio e Pepe returns to Oceanport, NJ

There are many great dishes to choose from in New Jersey. Yet, nothing will compare to the Italian heaven served at the Blu Grotto restaurant in Oceanport.It's called Cacio e Pepe and it's actually prepared in a cheese wheel.As Blu Grotto Assistant General Manager Casey Kehres tells New Jersey 101.5:"We offer Cacio e Pepe as a special every day of the week we are ope...

There are many great dishes to choose from in New Jersey. Yet, nothing will compare to the Italian heaven served at the Blu Grotto restaurant in Oceanport.

It's called Cacio e Pepe and it's actually prepared in a cheese wheel.

As Blu Grotto Assistant General Manager Casey Kehres tells New Jersey 101.5:

"We offer Cacio e Pepe as a special every day of the week we are open, Wednesday-Sunday. We don't offer it on Holidays."

"Our Cacio e Pepe is one of Chef James's Specialties. Cacio e Pepe translates to Cheese & Pepper. The dish hails from Rome, Italy. We make ours with House Made Pasta in the kitchen then we finish it tableside in a Pecorino Romano Cheese Wheel."

You cannot watch Cacio e Pepe being prepared and not want some. Hell, I'd even pay to scrape the cheese wheel at the end of the night!

The Blu Grotto has been open for six years this coming July. They are owned by the Horseman's Association of New Jersey. Kehres talks about some of their other great dishes:

"We offer Modern & Classic Adaptations of Regional Italian Favorites. Scratch-made pastas & dishes, as well as Prime Steaks. Chef James Corona only uses the best possible ingredients available."

"We also have an Open-Air Beer Garden with rotating beer taps, scratch-made Neapolitan style pizza, cooked in our custom pizza oven imported from Italy."

Chef James Corona and General Manager Elvin Kehres have been with The Blu Grotto since opening. Elvin's son, Casey Kehres just joined as Assistant General Manager last summer after a Stint at David Burkes Drifthouse in Sea Bright.

You can check out the Blu Grotto at 200 Port Au Peck Ave, Oceanport, NJ 07757 and follow along with them on Instagram.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Steve Trevelise only. Follow him on Twitter @realstevetrev.

You can now listen to Steve Trevelise — On Demand! Discover more about New Jersey’s personalities and what makes the Garden State interesting . Download the Steve Trevelise show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now:

Brewery Will Open This Fall At Fort Monmouth

Not only does Netflix plan to open a massive film production studio? at Fort Monmouth, a microbrewery will open there this fall as well:An aerial view of the Commissary at Fort Monmouth, where the brewery will be located. The commissary used to be the on-base grocery store. (Denholtz Properties)Another aerial view of the Commissary, located at 675 Oceanport Way in Oceanport. (Denholtz Properties)A mural at the Commissary. It's not just the brewery; more food and drink companies are coming to the Commissary, as well. (D...

Not only does Netflix plan to open a massive film production studio? at Fort Monmouth, a microbrewery will open there this fall as well:

An aerial view of the Commissary at Fort Monmouth, where the brewery will be located. The commissary used to be the on-base grocery store. (Denholtz Properties)

Another aerial view of the Commissary, located at 675 Oceanport Way in Oceanport. (Denholtz Properties)

A mural at the Commissary. It's not just the brewery; more food and drink companies are coming to the Commissary, as well. (Denholtz Properties)

OCEANPORT, NJ — The big news just keeps coming out of Fort Monmouth:

On the heels of June's reveal that Netflix plans to open a massive film production studio at Fort Monmouth, we now learn a brewery plans to open "on base" as well.

The brewery will be called Birdsmouth Beer and they announced this week they are leasing a 12,080-square-foot space at 675 Oceanport Way in Oceanport.

They are planning a fall opening. Right now, the building is completely under construction.

Several years ago, there was talk of a brewery opening at Fort Monmouth, but those plans fell through. Birdsmouth Beer is an entirely new brewery that has never launched before; you can check their website here: https://birdsmouthbeer.com/

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It bills itself as "Jersey's all-lager craft brewery" and is headed by co-founder Andrew Gioia, the former head brewer at Kane Brewing in Ocean Township, and real estate executive Rocco Laginestra. The brewery plans a full beer-brewing production facility on site, as well as a tasting room "to create a one-of-a-kind experience for craft beer enthusiasts and casual visitors alike."

Fort Monmouth is a sprawling 1,127-acre former U.S. Army base that straddles the towns of Tinton Falls, Oceanport and Eatontown. The U.S. Army closed the base in 2011, and acres and acres of land have sat empty ever since, with literally tumbleweeds blowing through the deserted property.

But these days, Fort Monmouth is enjoying a resurgence building boom.

The brewery will open in what is known as "The Commissary," or what used to be the on-base grocery store. More food and drink businesses will be coming next to the brewery, all as-of-yet unrevealed.

The Commissary is part of District A, a 26-acre parcel of the base. In 2020, the entirety of District A was purchased by Denholtz Properties, a commercial real estate developer based in Red Bank.

The developer said it wants to turn the Commissary into "the retail and commercial hub of Fort Monmouth."

“Our goal at Fort Monmouth is to create a hub where businesses of all types can thrive and power the resurgence of this important piece of New Jersey’s history,” said Kristine Hurlbut, senior vice president of leasing at Denholtz.

Here is the latest on all the development underway at Fort Monmouth:

Ralph Zucker and his company, Somerset Development — the same owner of Bell Works in Holmdel — is currently building luxury town homes and a waterfront walkway on site. In late 2021, Zucker purchased 15 acres of Fort Monmouth in Oceanport, on which he is building 144 town homes. Read that story: Bell Works Developer Expands With Fort Monmouth Luxury Townhomes

The Fort Monmouth bowling alley is not happening: Rumson developer Parker Creek Partners, which planned to build the bowling alley, instead sold that parcel of land back to the Fort Monmouth Revitalization Authority. The developer never said why they backed out of the bowling alley, but there may have been a lack of interest or customers. Read that story: Fort Monmouth Bowling Alley Now Scrapped

Get ready for Netflix: In June, Netflix placed a bid to purchase 298 acres on Fort Monmouth. Netflix will turn it into a massive East Coast film/movie production studio, where they will film shows and movies for their streaming service. Gov. Phil Murphy greatly wooed Netflix to open there. The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority has not yet announced whether they approved Netflix's bid; stay tuned. Read that story: Netflix Places Bid To Open Monmouth County Film Studio

Did you know? There are $700K luxury townhomes for sale at Fort Monmouth: RPM Development Group is the developer of rental homes Liberty Walk and 68 private homes for sale, called East Gate. These properties are located on what is known as Officers' Row, where high-ranking officers stationed at Fort Monmouth used to live. RPM said they want to "transform Fort Monmouth into the premier live/work/play neighborhood on the Jersey Shore."Here's what the homes look like: https://patch.com/new-jersey/m...

Denholtz plans to open 72,400 square feet of modern spec industrial/flex space across three buildings on the site of the former Warehouse District at Fort Monmouth. This would be small bay warehousing. The construction of the three buildings is scheduled for completion in 2023.

There is also a luxury gym open on the site, the high-end Fort Athletic Club. Gym membership is thriving, says owner Scott Marchakitus.

To learn more about leasing at The Commissary at Baseline, contact Suzanne Macnow, Senior Vice President, CBRE at [email protected] or 732-509-8927.

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Netflix Places Bid To Open Monmouth County Film Studio

On Monday, Netflix placed a bid to purchase 298 acres of the old Fort Monmouth property in Oceanport:OCEANPORT, NJ — Netflix is indeed moving forward with its plans to open a film production studio in Monmouth County.On Monday, Netflix placed a bid to purchase 298 acres of the old Fort Monmouth property in Oceanport. In the first quarter of 2022, Netflix lost 200,000 subscribers and its stock price plunged, leading some to speculate Netflix would not move forward with its opening of a new film studio in New Jersey....

On Monday, Netflix placed a bid to purchase 298 acres of the old Fort Monmouth property in Oceanport:

OCEANPORT, NJ — Netflix is indeed moving forward with its plans to open a film production studio in Monmouth County.

On Monday, Netflix placed a bid to purchase 298 acres of the old Fort Monmouth property in Oceanport. In the first quarter of 2022, Netflix lost 200,000 subscribers and its stock price plunged, leading some to speculate Netflix would not move forward with its opening of a new film studio in New Jersey.

However, on Monday they placed their bid.

The Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA) announced the news here. In total, four developers placed bids Monday to buy land at Fort Monmouth.

The four companies that placed bids to buy the land are:

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FMERA must now choose one of the four.

"Please be advised that this process may take several months," said the authority.

Neither Netflix nor FMERA would say how much Netflix offered to buy the land. Bidding offer documents are not public until the contract is executed and signed by both parties.

The news first broke last summer that Netflix wanted to turn a 298-acre space on Fort Monmouth into a massive new TV/movie production studio. Then in October, Netflix publicly confirmed they were indeed interested. This would be Netflix's first film studio in New Jersey, but they did just open a studio in Bushwick, Brooklyn:

“America's first movie studio was in New Jersey, and today it's home to many talented people working in entertainment," said Netflix in a statement last fall. "Governor Murphy and the state’s legislative leaders have created a business environment that's welcomed film and television production back to the state, and we’re excited to submit our bid to transform Fort Monmouth into a state-of-the-art production facility.”

In April 2021, Gov. Murphy sent a letter to the production heads of Netflix, Disney and Warner Bros., among other film studios, trying to lure them with tax breaks to film movies in the Garden State.

In that letter, Murphy criticized Georgia's voter ID laws as one reason why they should leave Georgia and move their business to the Garden State.

“I’ve watched the recent decisions coming from the Georgia State House with disappointment. Restricting the right to vote is more than just wrong, it’s un-American,” Murphy wrote in his letter to Netflix, obtained by The Hollywood Reporter. “These voting restrictions have thrust Georgia into the national spotlight, with the vast majority seeing the state’s decision as an attack on people of color by a Governor and Legislature willing to do anything to stay in power.”

Murphy offered the film studios tax credits equal to what the state of Georgia currently offers: Tax credits up to 30 percent of production costs and a 40-percent tax credit for any studio that opens brick-and-mortar offices in New Jersey, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Murphy also tried to woo Disney and Warner Brothers to open film production studios in New Jersey.

Fort Monmouth is a 1,127-acre former U.S. Army base that straddles the areas of Tinton Falls, Oceanport and Eatontown. It was closed down by the Army in 2011.

Netflix moving in is part of the larger Fort Monmouth building boom currently underway, as developers seek to turn the former officers' homes into luxury townhouses, with prices starting in the upper $700Ks. A waterfront walkway is being built and a high-end gym has been open for several years now (The Fort Athletic Club). There were also plans to build a microbrewery and a bowling center at Fort Monmouth, but those appear to have been shelved.

Read: Ft. Monmouth Building Boom: Townhomes, Waterfront Walkway Coming (March 2021)

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