BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Oceanport

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Oceanport, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Oceanport, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Oceanport, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Oceanport, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Oceanport, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Oceanport, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Oceanport

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Oceanport:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Oceanport, NJ

Latest News in Oceanport, NJ

Netflix officially bids to turn Fort Monmouth Mega Parcel into production studio

OCEANPORT - Netflix has bid on Fort Monmouth's Mega Parcel, putting an end to nearly a year of speculation that the streaming giant wanted to set up a production studio in New Jersey.The ...

OCEANPORT - Netflix has bid on Fort Monmouth's Mega Parcel, putting an end to nearly a year of speculation that the streaming giant wanted to set up a production studio in New Jersey.

The Mega Parcel, a large 292-acre parcel located in parts of Eatontown and Oceanport at the former U.S. Army base, was put out to bid in March by the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority, the state agency redeveloping the fort with mostly private investors.

Netflix made headlines last October when it announced that it wanted the site for a production studio, after Gov. Phil Murphy made an incentive-filled pitch with tax breaks to lure major production companies, including Walt Disney Co., Warner Bros. and Netflix, to New Jersey.

FMERA opened the bids at 12:30 p.m. Monday, 90 days after it put the site up for sale. The agency didn't say what was the amount of Netflix's bid, listed as Netflix Studio Fort Monmouth.

Netflix's spokespeople declined to comment on the bid.

There was some concern that Netflix might drop out of the Mega Parcel bidding after the company reported it lost 200,000 subscribers in the first quarter resulting in a large drop in the value of its stock. However, the company still reported a 10% increase in earnings in the first quarter over last year as it raked in $1.6 billion in profit.

Three other investors also bid on the property. FMERA did not reveal any details about these bids either in order to protect the integrity of the bid process.

The first bid was from Extell Acquisitions, an affiliate of Extell Development, which built the luxury condominiums The Lofts at Pier Village.

The second bid was from RDR Partners, which is made up of Russo Development, Dinallo Construction Co. and River Development — the latter is based in Red Bank. The three have combined on previous projects redeveloping industrial and commercial sites, such as a former flag factory in Verona which was turned into apartment lofts.

A final bid was made by Mega Parcel Development LLC. The principal is Joseph Saadia, who works out of New Brunswick and Manhattan and invests in former industrial sites.

It will be several more weeks or even months before the public finds out if Netflix actually gets the site, as FMERA will take that time to evaluate and score each bid. After that it will set the draft terms for a contract, known as a purchase and sale agreement and redevelopment agreement, or PSARA, with the selected bidder.

"We're ecstatic that we have several bids for the property. It's never bad to have multiple options. It will be up to the finer points of the submissions to see whose bid gets awarded," said Oceanport Mayor Jay Coffey, who along with the the mayors of Eatontown and Tinton Falls, sits on FMERA's executive board.

Coffey could not comment on the bids specifically due to him having a vote on the final selection as part of the board.

The parcel is the largest FMERA has offered for sale since it began the process over a decade ago when the fort closed in 2011. It envisioned the Mega Parcel as serving as a regional hub for one or more high-wage, high-growth sectors, including film and digital media, life sciences, information and high tech, clean energy and food and beverage as well as residential homes.

The property, which consists of several redevelopment districts in Eatontown and Oceanport, was appraised at $55.4 million. The site also has many defunct buildings that will have to be demolished.

Development:Rotting Howard Commons homes tumble down as water tank points to fort future

Fort Monmouth:Eatontown buys land from fort for park with splash pad for kids

The winning bidder will most likely propose investing hundreds of millions of dollars, considering that previous developers who bid for the smaller 89-acre Parcel B proposed investing well over $100 million before backing out.

Parcel B, which failed to sell multiple times, was placed into the Mega Parcel.

"They're all quality developers, that's the good news. We'll have to wait and see whose hands it ends up in but it should be good for the area and Monmouth County," said Peter Reinhart, the former director of the Kislak Real Estate Institute at Monmouth University, who's now retired.

When Jersey Shore native Dan Radel is not reporting the news, you can find him in a college classroom where he is a history professor. Reach him @danielradelapp; 732-643-4072; [email protected]

Netflix's Massive NJ Film Studio Moves Forward At Fort Monmouth

The next step is an agreed sale price. If the deal goes through, this would be one of Netflix's biggest film studios in the world.OCEANPORT, NJ — Netflix has been selected to open a massive film production studio at Fort Monmouth, if a price can be agreed upon between the streaming giant and the government authority that owns all the land on the former military base.Fort Monmouth is the former U.S. Army base in Monmouth County that was shut down by the federal government in 2011, and decommissioned. The fort property is...

The next step is an agreed sale price. If the deal goes through, this would be one of Netflix's biggest film studios in the world.

OCEANPORT, NJ — Netflix has been selected to open a massive film production studio at Fort Monmouth, if a price can be agreed upon between the streaming giant and the government authority that owns all the land on the former military base.

Fort Monmouth is the former U.S. Army base in Monmouth County that was shut down by the federal government in 2011, and decommissioned. The fort property is 1,127 acres in total.

If the deal goes through, Netflix will purchase 298 acres on the base and open TV/movie production studios that will span blocks. It would be Netflix's second biggest film studio in the world, rivaling their existing New Mexico film studios, which sit on 300 acres outside Albuquerque.

The news was confirmed by Netflix Wednesday morning. Netflix said they plan to build "across" the entire 298 acres, but not at the fort's parade grounds.

"While there is still work to be done with the Economic Development Authority to finalize the deal, we are thrilled that FMERA's preferred choice is our proposal for a state-of-the-art production complex," said a Netflix spokesperson. "If our plans are approved, we hope to build a facility that will create significant economic impact and job growth for New Jersey."

Interested in local real estate?Subscribe to Patch's new newsletter to be the first to know about open houses, new listings and more.

In June of this year, Netflix placed a bid to purchase the land from the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority (FMERA), the government entity that owns all the land on the base.

Three other companies, all of them real estate development firms, also placed bids to buy or lease that parcel of land.

Until today, FMERA has not made a decision on which bidder they selected for the property. But it was widely assumed Netflix would be chosen as the top bidder, as Gov. Phil Murphy strongly backs Netflix coming to New Jersey.

However, Netflix and FMERA have not yet agreed on a sale price for the 298 acres, and there is no signed agreement of sale between the company and the government. Over the next few months, FMERA and Netflix still need to "finalize economic terms of the deal," said the Netflix spokesperson Wednesday.

FMERA's executive director Kara Kopach made it clear they have not agreed on a sale price with Netflix.

"FMERA will make no further representations to the potential purchase of property until the staff is prepared to recommend the approval of a fully negotiated purchase and sale agreement and redevelopment agreement to the FMERA board," she told the Asbury Park Press Wednesday, the day Netflix announced they had been selected.

The board of the Fort Monmouth Economic Revitalization Authority includes Lt. Gov. Sheila Oliver, NJ DEP Commissioner Shawn LaTourette, Dept. of Transportation Commissioner Diane Gutierrez-Scaccetti and the mayors of Eatontown, Oceanport and Tinton Falls.

It was Murphy who initially wooed Netflix to come to New Jersey: In April of 2021 he sent a letter to the studio heads at Netflix, Disney and Warner Bros. trying to lure them with tax breaks to make movies and TV shows in the Garden State.

In that letter, Murphy specifically criticized Georgia's voter ID laws and said voter ID should factor into their decision to leave Georgia and come to New Jersey.

“I’ve watched the recent decisions coming from the Georgia State House with disappointment. Restricting the right to vote is more than just wrong, it’s un-American,” Murphy wrote in his letter, obtained by The Hollywood Reporter. "Our new $14.5 billion economic incentive package makes the Garden State just as competitive as Georgia to attract film and television production businesses. One thing is clear: when it comes to social policies, corporate responsibility, and — not to be overlooked — economic opportunity, New Jersey is now a top contender for your business.”

Murphy offered the film studios tax credits equal to what Georgia currently offers: Tax credits up to 30 percent of production costs and a 40-percent tax credit for any studio that opens brick-and-mortar offices, according to the Wall Street Journal.

Murphy said if Netflix opens the film production studio, it will bring "high-quality, good-paying jobs to our state." Netflix said they want to come to New Jersey because "the state is loaded with creative talent and technical expertise.”

A small group of Monmouth County residents say they are skeptical Netflix will bring permanent jobs (they say Netflix will pick up and relocate if and when another state offers them more lucrative tax incentives), and they criticized the tax breaks from the Murphy administration. They formed the website No2Netflix.

Fort Monmouth straddles the towns of Tinton Falls, Oceanport and Eatontown. Huge swaths of the base have sat empty and abandoned for more than a decade now.

But Fort Monmouth is currently witnessing an unprecedented redevelopment boom: There are now luxury townhouses for rent and for sale on the property, a high-end gym called the Fort Athletic Club, and a brewery will open in the old Army grocery store this weekend.

Development boom at Fort Monmouth: Part Of Fort Monmouth Converted To Private Homes, Rentals (March 2021)

Ft. Monmouth Building Boom: Townhomes, Waterfront Walkway Coming (March 2021)

New Fort Monmouth Craft Brewery Will Open This Saturday

Like beer? Birdsmouth Beer, the new craft brewery located in the Oceanport section of Fort Monmouth, will have their grand opening Oct. 15.OCEANPORT, NJ — Birdsmouth Beer, the brand-new craft brewery at the Fort Monmouth Army base, announced they will have their official grand opening this Saturday, Oct. 15....

Like beer? Birdsmouth Beer, the new craft brewery located in the Oceanport section of Fort Monmouth, will have their grand opening Oct. 15.

OCEANPORT, NJ — Birdsmouth Beer, the brand-new craft brewery at the Fort Monmouth Army base, announced they will have their official grand opening this Saturday, Oct. 15.

The brewery is located at 675 Oceanport Way in Oceanport, in what was known as the Commissary, or the former on-base grocery store for soldiers and their families. They will be open from 12 noon to 9 p.m. both Saturday and Sunday.

Birdsmouth only brews lager beer, and is headed by co-founder Andrew Gioia, the former head brewer at Kane Brewing in Ocean Township, and real estate executive Rocco Laginestra.

All the lagers are brewed on site, and they also have a tasting room. There are plans for an outdoor beer garden in the future. Birdsmouth also hopes to sell their beer to Monmouth County restaurants and bars, and up and down the Jersey Shore.

Fort Monmouth is a sprawling 1,127-acre former U.S. Army base that straddles the towns of Tinton Falls, Oceanport and Eatontown. The U.S. Army opened Fort Monmouth in 1917 and the base was actually home to the first radar system to bounce signals off the moon.

However, the U.S. Army closed the base in 2011, and its acres and acres of land have sat empty ever since.

But these days, Fort Monmouth is witnessing an unprecedented building boom. The new craft brewery is only one of the new businesses located on site.

There's also:

Red Bank-based developer Denholtz Properties actually owns the Commissary building where the new brewery will be located. Denholtz and its leasing agent, Pierson, are still looking for more tenants to rent out the Commissary. The Commissary is a very big, sprawling building, as it used to be a grocery store.

Master brewer Gioia and partner Laginestra had been searching for the right location for their brewery and tasting-room startup, according to Gary Krauss, director at commercial real estate broker Pierson Commercial, which arranged the lease.

“They had been looking for the most-suitable spot within the Jersey Shore submarket, where they could achieve that local feel and be in close and easy proximity to the major arteries of distribution throughout the state,” Krauss said. “The Commissary checked all of their boxes as an exciting new development in an up-and-coming part of affluent Monmouth County. It is close to the beach and offers almost-immediate connectivity to the Garden State Parkway as well as Routes 18, 35 and 36.”

3-course deals: Jersey Shore Restaurant Week is back at more than 50 eateries

Jersey Shore Restaurant Week, the area's biannual celebration of local dining, kicks off Friday, Nov. 4.The week — actually 10 days — features prix fixe menus from more than 50 restaurants in Monmouth and Ocean counties, which will offer lunch and dinner deals for $30.22 and $40.22.Restaurant Week runs through Sunday, Nov. 13.From new participants to related events, here's a look at what's happening:This year's new additionsJersey Shore Restaurant Week takes place in April and N...

Jersey Shore Restaurant Week, the area's biannual celebration of local dining, kicks off Friday, Nov. 4.

The week — actually 10 days — features prix fixe menus from more than 50 restaurants in Monmouth and Ocean counties, which will offer lunch and dinner deals for $30.22 and $40.22.

Restaurant Week runs through Sunday, Nov. 13.

From new participants to related events, here's a look at what's happening:

This year's new additions

Jersey Shore Restaurant Week takes place in April and November, and each time, new restaurants sign on. This month's first-timers include restaurants that opened this year and others that have been around longer: Killer Pies in Asbury Park; Al Ponte (previously Simko's Grill) in Neptune City; 801 Craft Kitchen and Spirits in Belmar; Berg's Smoked Meat & Poutine in Belmar; Mantoloking Road Ale House in Brick; 21A on Broadway in Long Branch; and Beijing Bistro (previously Temple Gourmet Chinese), Catch 19, Centrada and Triumph Brewing Company, all in Red Bank.

Kevin Newberg, owner of Berg's, said Restaurant Week "is a great opportunity for new customers to discover us. It’s also allowed us to give customers a great deal on our food, which isn’t so easy during these inflated times."

The best deals

Restaurant Week menus include an appetizer, entrée and dessert, and diners can get the biggest bang for their buck at restaurants with regularly higher price points.

The prix fixe menu at Avenue, which serves French food by the beach in Long Branch, includes escargot, steak tartare, boeuf Bourguignon, steak frites and pot de crème. The GOAT by David Burke in Union Beach will have Wagyu meatball parmesan, short rib and shrimp surf and turf, and Burke's signature cheesecake lollipop tree. Ohana Grill in Lavallette will serve braised pork ribs, lobster ravioli in truffle cream sauce, jumbo lump crab cakes, and pistachio tartufo.

The event's founder, Jim Flynn of Brielle, said the best deals include the meals offered at 21A on Broadway, Beijing Bistro, Blu Grotto in Oceanport and Grandma's Meatball in Manasquan.

Restaurant Week events

In addition to special menus, the week also includes culinary events before and during Jersey Shore Restaurant Week:

For more information about Jersey Shore Restaurant Week or to purchase tickets to the events, visit jerseyshorerestaurantweek.com.

Sarah Griesemer joined the USA TODAY NETWORK New Jersey in 2003 and has been writing all things food since 2014. Send restaurant tips to [email protected], and for more Jersey Shore food news, subscribe to our weekly Jersey Shore Eats newsletter.

Oceanport Ready to Play with Park Renovations

By Stephen AppezzatoOCEANPORT – Renovations to the Maria Gatta Community Park in the borough will soon be finalized, offering locals and visiting teams a brand-new multiuse sports park.The borough began renovations on the park, which had been in decline for years, earlier this summer. The popular field complex located across from Monmouth Park Racetrack will be the new location for three artificial turf fields lined for soccer, field hockey and lacrosse matches. Work on the project is expected to be compl...

By Stephen Appezzato

OCEANPORT – Renovations to the Maria Gatta Community Park in the borough will soon be finalized, offering locals and visiting teams a brand-new multiuse sports park.

The borough began renovations on the park, which had been in decline for years, earlier this summer. The popular field complex located across from Monmouth Park Racetrack will be the new location for three artificial turf fields lined for soccer, field hockey and lacrosse matches. Work on the project is expected to be completed by the end of September.

“Those fields were really nothing more than an old, macadam parking lot with three of four inches of dirt, small rocks, bottle caps and shards of glass on top of it,” said Oceanport Mayor Jay Coffey. “Oceanport Recreation hadn’t used them for soccer since 2006 because of how bad they were and the Peninsula Soccer Club stopped playing games there several years ago because visiting teams refused to play there.”

In addition to the artificial turf fields, the park will have a new entrance, new parking and walkways in compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act. In total, the project is expected to cost up to $2.95 million.

Coffey said the council and recreation committee “crunched the numbers” and decided turf fields would be the best option for a number of reasons. Turf fields can be easily marked for multiple sports and “provide a level playing surface for the first time in the park’s history,” he said. Artificial turf also means no mowing and less maintenance for the borough’s Department of Public Works. With the renovation, an access road that bisected the field will be removed, maximizing playing area, Coffey noted.

The addition of the three fields will complement the borough’s other sports areas at the Community Center Park (also currently being renovated) and BlackBerry Bay Park, allowing for more activities, Coffey said.

“I think it’s going to pay immediate dividends because people will want to play there,” Coffey said.

Part of the renovation expense – $150,000 – will be funded through sports betting tax revenue from Monmouth Park Racetrack $150,000. According to Coffey, a large portion of the remaining cost will be covered by usage fees paid by “travel teams, nonrecreational leagues and tournaments.” He expects those funds to be substantial enough to offset the greater portion of the debt service associated with this park improvement project.”

“We take great pride in our parks, and we want people in town playing on our courts, fields and playgrounds and enjoying all of our recreational facilities. We kept our parks open and operational even at the height of the COVID-19 pandemic and Oceanport’s governing body has prioritized both infrastructure improvement and annual maintenance of our entire park system,” he noted.

Ongoing refurbishment of other municipal parks includes the reconstruction of the baseball field at Community Center Park, as well as new backstop and safety fencing, team benches, ADA-accessible bleachers, tennis court fencing and benches, and other facility amenities. The project is partially funded by a $150,000 grant from the Monmouth County Municipal Open Space grant program. Community Center Park is expected to reopen in mid-October.

The article originally appeared in the September 8 – 14, 2022 print edition of The Two River Times.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.