BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Ocean

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Ocean, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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Basement Waterproofing in Ocean

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Ocean:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Ocean, NJ

Latest News in Ocean, NJ

Ocean football remains unbeaten; tops Red Bank 26-22 with fourth quarter comeback

OCEAN TOWNSHIP – Facing fourth-and-3 near midfield with a minute to play, with an unblemished record and the Shore Conference Freedom Division title on the line, Ocean quarterback Tyler Douglas knew what had to be done.“I told coach (Don Klein), I said 'call my number,’ ” Douglas said. “I’m playing a little banged up but you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do.”What Douglas did was run right, cut back past several Red Bank defenders near the sideline before spr...

OCEAN TOWNSHIP – Facing fourth-and-3 near midfield with a minute to play, with an unblemished record and the Shore Conference Freedom Division title on the line, Ocean quarterback Tyler Douglas knew what had to be done.

“I told coach (Don Klein), I said 'call my number,’ ” Douglas said. “I’m playing a little banged up but you’ve got to do what you’ve got to do.”

What Douglas did was run right, cut back past several Red Bank defenders near the sideline before sprinting past everyone to the end zone on a 47-yard touchdown dash with 52 seconds on the clock, capping a furious fourth-quarter comeback for a dramatic 26-22 victory at Carelli Field.

In improving to 8-0 for the second time in four seasons, Ocean, ranked sixth in the Asbury Park Press Top 10, produced a heart-pounding victory for the second straight week, having won an overtime thriller over Middletown North seven days earlier.

“It’s a characteristic we try to instill in our players,” Klein said. “To play this game you’re asked to do things that most 15, 16, 17, 18-year-old kids are not asked to do on a daily basis, on a weekly basis when we compete against other good teams that are well-coached. We have a collective heartbeat and we talk about loving each other a lot in our program. And there is love within our players and coaches that leads to a never-say-die attitude.”

Having secured the division title, it’s on to NJSIAA South Group 3 play. The Spartans will be looking for their first sectional title since 2005 against South Jersey stalwarts including Delsea, Seneca, which beat Ocean with a touchdown in the final seconds in the opening round in 2019, and Timber Creek.

Red Bank (4-3, 3-2), which had won four straight games, built a 22-13 lead heading into the fourth quarter. But Ocean pulled to within 22-20 on a 13-yard TD pass from Douglas to James Sobieski with 8:42 remaining.

The Bucs, who got three touchdowns from Lamar Hicks, including a 35-yard catch-and-run for a score in the third quarter, appeared poised to put the game away when they got the ball back, driving to the Ocean 25. But a pair of penalties eventually forced a punt, with Ocean taking over at its own 17 with 4:17 to play.

Douglas converted a fourth-and-7 from the 20 with a 10-yard pass to C.J. Flannigan, before his game-winning fourth-down heroics.

“We didn’t come this far, going 7-0, to go 7-1 or share the division,” Douglas said. “So our mindset was we want to win the division outright so let’s find a way, and we did.”

First half fireworks

After Red Bank scored first early in the second quarter, Ocean answered with a 97-yard drive. A 21-yard run by Caleb Thompson moved the ball into Red Bank territory, before Douglas finished the drive off with a 36-yard TD strike to Flannigan to even the game at 7-all with 5:08 left in the first half.

Red Bank got a big play on its next possession, with quarterback Pierce Olsen finding Ky’Yam Martin for 57 yards down to the Ocean 18. Three plays later it was Hicks scoring on a four-yard run, sweeping to the right to push Red Bank’s lead to 14-7.

By the Numbers

Olsen hit all seven of his first half passes for 141 yards, as Red Bank outgained Ocean, 188-97, over the opening 24 minutes. For the game, Olsen was 12-of-16 for 215 yards.

Douglas accounted for 270 yards of offense including 157 passing and 113 rushing.

They said it

“We have a lot of confidence,” Klein said. “We’re going to continue to fight. We understand what the playoffs are about. It’s win or go home and we are not ready to go home.”

Ocean 26, Red Bank 22

Red Bank 0 14 8 0 - 22

Ocean 0 7 6 13 - 26

SCORING

First quarter

No scoring

Second quarter

RB – Hicks 6 run (Dautaj kicks).

O - Flannigan 36 pass from Douglas (Sorrentino kicks).

RB – Hicks 4 run (Dautaj kicks).

Third quarter

O – Flannigan 23 pass from Douglas (kick fails).

RB – Hicks 35 pass from Olsen (Borenius runs).

Fourth quarter

O – Sobieski 13 pass from Douglas (Sorrentino kicks).

O – Douglas 47 run (run fails).

STATISTICS

Rushing – O: Douglas 10-113, Thompson 13-91, Garrett 1-5, Iacouzzi 2-1; RB: Jones 11-48, Olsen 7-17, Hicks 5-14, Borenius 3-12, Eckerstrom 2-(-1), Niesz 1-4.

Passing – O: Douglas 12-17-0 157, Flannigan 0-1-0; RB: Olsen 12-16-0 215.

Receiving – O: Flannigan 6-90, Sobieski 1-13, Iacouzzi 1-8, Thompson 3-36 Garrett 1-10; RB: Hicks 4-97, Martin 3-63, Liam Stack 2-35, Eckerstrom 1-10.

Penalties – O: 6-37; RB: 9-60.

NJ Seniors at Risk of Storm Surges in Atlantic, Cape May, Ocean Counties

Cape May County resident Fury Feraco, 90, lives in a house on a raised dune. Photograph by Edward Lea, Press of Atlantic City.People aged 85 and older are at severe risk during storm surge events, vulnerable to injury and death even during evacuations. Yet elderly populations living along American coasts continue to increase.Ahead of the ten-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy making landfall in the Northeast, Climate Central conducted this analysis to identify areas where very elderly residents are concentrated in areas in ...

Cape May County resident Fury Feraco, 90, lives in a house on a raised dune. Photograph by Edward Lea, Press of Atlantic City.

People aged 85 and older are at severe risk during storm surge events, vulnerable to injury and death even during evacuations. Yet elderly populations living along American coasts continue to increase.

Ahead of the ten-year anniversary of Superstorm Sandy making landfall in the Northeast, Climate Central conducted this analysis to identify areas where very elderly residents are concentrated in areas in the South Jersey counties South Jersey counties of Atlantic, Cape May and Ocean that would be expected to flood again during another storm surge such as Sandy's.

An estimated 1,644 people over 85 were found to live in communities in these counties that would be expected to experience flooding in another Sandy-like storm surge. Sandy's storm tide was 4.29 ft above the high tide line in Atlantic City.

This analysis builds on Climate Central’s 2021 report that examined risks of coastal flooding to nursing homes and assisted living facilities as sea levels rise and severe storms become more frequent. The report highlighted unique threats to seniors, who experience higher death rates from hurricanes as well as financial and other health consequences of flooding. While evacuating from an aged care facility can be more dangerous than sheltering in place, the choices are different for the growing number of elderly people who live alone.

While fewer than 2% of Americans are aged 85 or older, in a census tract in the center of Ocean City, about 17% of the population belonged to this age group, according to the latest Census data. The area, which is only about 1.6 acres in size, would be expected to be inundated again in a Sandy-like storm surge.

Two other examples of areas home to concentrations of very elderly residents that would be underwater during such a storm surge were identified at the southern end of Ventnor City and on a stretch of shoreline that includes the communities of Barnegat Light, Harvey Cedars, and Long Beach.

Key findings

Thousands of elderly people are living in neighborhoods that would experience some flooding during a storm like Sandy.

Many of these seniors are living in neighborhoods that would be fully flooded.

Census tracts with the greatest percentage of residents aged 85+

Area DescriptionGeographic Area nameEstimated total PopEstimated total 85+Estimated median ageEstimated proportion of residents 85+
(For comparison)United States326,569,3086,621,81638.22
Ventnor City, Suffolk Ave-Jackson AveCensus Tract 132.01, Atlantic County, New Jersey295534456.811.6
Ocean City, between 18th and 32nd streetsCensus Tract 202.03, Cape May County, New Jersey217536668.516.8
Ventnor City & Ventnor Heights, Dorset Ave-New Haven AveCensus Tract 133.02, Atlantic County, New Jersey246217856.47.2
Atlantic City, between Ohio & Tennessee Ave and Sewell & Baltic AveCensus Tract 11, Atlantic County, New Jersey19506950.13.5
Ventnor City, between Margate City border and New Haven AvenueCensus Tract 133.01, Atlantic County, New Jersey23946957.42.9
Barnegat Light, Harvey Cedars, Long Beach TownshipCensus Tract 7381, Ocean County, New Jersey158910465.16.5

Methodology

Climate Central had previously produced a map that modeled the extent of flooding during Hurricane Sandy. To compare flood areas with very elderly populations, data from U.S. Census Bureau's American Community Survey was downloaded from the Bureau’s data website and the table was added to ArcGIS Online and compared with Climate Central's modeling of the extent of Sandy's storm surge.

By using a basemap composed of satellite imagery with street labels and place names, residential areas were identified. Census tracts with neighborhoods that were partially or fully flooded were identified visually and added to a separate table, from which a list of risk hotspots was created.

Lifeguards in 3 Shore towns due $400K in unpaid overtime, state says

Lifeguards in three New Jersey towns are due more than $400,000 in unpaid overtime, the Labor Department said Friday.Atlantic City, Avalon and Stone Harbor failed to pay 347 lifeguards properly during the summers of 2021 and 2022, it said. The Labor Department also found all three towns improperly documented the employment of minors, it said.The agency started investigations after receiving complaints from workers, it said.“New Jersey’s lifeguards put their lives on the line for the safety of summer shore vis...

Lifeguards in three New Jersey towns are due more than $400,000 in unpaid overtime, the Labor Department said Friday.

Atlantic City, Avalon and Stone Harbor failed to pay 347 lifeguards properly during the summers of 2021 and 2022, it said. The Labor Department also found all three towns improperly documented the employment of minors, it said.

The agency started investigations after receiving complaints from workers, it said.

“New Jersey’s lifeguards put their lives on the line for the safety of summer shore visitors, so it’s our responsibility to ensure they receive all the wages they are entitled to,” Labor Commissioner Robert Asaro-Angelo said in a statement. “We will continue to make sure workers — especially young workers who may not yet understand their work rights — are being paid properly.”

Lifeguards in Atlantic City were only paid overtime after working a 48-hour work week when they should have received overtime after 40 hours, the agency said. In all, 146 employees were found to be owed $197,150 in unpaid overtime.

Also in Atlantic City, 14 minors worked without a proper Employment Certificates, and their “in” and “out” times were not documented as required by law, the agency said.

In Avalon, no overtime was paid at all, the Labor Department said. There were 125 employees who worked more than 40 hours in a week, totaling $116,161 in unpaid overtime.

Seven minors’ hours were not properly documented, nor did they have the proper Employment Certificates, it said.

No overtime was paid to lifeguards in Stone Harbor, while 76 employees worked more than 40 hours a week, the Labor Department said. They should have been paid $94,114 in overtime, it said.

Five minor employees in Stone Harbor didn’t have proper Employment Certificates nor were correct time-in and time-out records kept by the town, it said.

Nearly all the workers have received their back wages, the agency said.

The investigations come after the agency ramped up inspections of beach patrols across the state after the deaths of two lifeguards in August 2021.

Lifeguard Norman Inferrera III, 16, died after his patrol boat capsized in Cape May at Reading Avenue Beach, and lifeguard Keith Pinto, 19, died after he was struck by lightning at White Sands Beach in Berkeley Township.

It found 73 violations during the 58 inspections of beach patrols that employ public employees in Monmouth, Ocean, Atlantic and Cape May counties.

The Labor Department didn’t name the specific municipalities, but it said five of the violations were issued in Atlantic County and eight were issued in Cape May County. There were 16 in Monmouth County and 44 in Ocean County, which had 38 recordkeeping violations. Also, 32 “Hazard Awareness Letters” on boat and/or lightning safety and 26 “Orders to Comply,” were issued, the Labor Department said.

The Labor Department said workers who believe they were wrongly denied compensation or benefits should visit myworkrights.nj.gov or call (609) 292-2305.

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Ocean Wind Pro-NJ Grantor Trust Receives Unexpected Number of Funding Requests from Coastal Towns for Local Coastal Resiliency Projects

Ocean Wind Pro-NJ Grantor Trust Receives Unexpected Number of Funding Requests from Coastal Towns for Local Coastal Resiliency Projects Phillipsburg, NJ – The Pro-NJ Grantor Trust’s call for Expressions of Interest, ahead of the formal application process needed to apply for funding for coastal infrastructure and resiliency projects, resulted in more interest than anticipated. Seventeen requests came from municipalities throughout Cape May, Atlantic and Ocean counties, totaling nearly $19 ...

Ocean Wind Pro-NJ Grantor Trust Receives Unexpected Number of Funding Requests from Coastal Towns for Local Coastal Resiliency Projects

Phillipsburg, NJ – The Pro-NJ Grantor Trust’s call for Expressions of Interest, ahead of the formal application process needed to apply for funding for coastal infrastructure and resiliency projects, resulted in more interest than anticipated. Seventeen requests came from municipalities throughout Cape May, Atlantic and Ocean counties, totaling nearly $19 million, more than five times the amount the Trust set aside for this round.

The initial responding municipalities include: Avalon, North Wildwood, Ocean City, Sea Isle City, Wildwood and Wildwood Crest in Cape May County; Atlantic City, Hammonton, Longport, Margate and Ventnor in Atlantic County; and Brick, Little Egg Harbor, Township of Ocean Pine Beach and Stafford Township in Ocean County.

Of the 17 municipalities, seven have been invited at this time to submit formal applications – Avalon, North Wildwood, Wildwood, Longport, Margate, Ventnor City and Little Egg Harbor Township. The Trust’s goal is to fund at least one project in each of the counties while providing a sufficient grant award to allow a project to be completed.

During this round of funding, the Trust earmarked $3.5 million in support of coastal infrastructure and resiliency projects that aim to help mitigate the impacts of severe weather occurrences and flooding to help increase resiliency and help municipalities and counties better respond to natural disasters.

“The unexpected interest in this round was a welcomed surprise to the Trust,” said Beverly McCall, chair of the Pro-NJ Grantor Trust. “While we initially had to make a tough decision to move seven projects forward to fit the $3.5 million limit, given the need shown by our coastal communities, the Trust is reviewing ways to include the other towns in the application process for this round or provide special consideration for the next coastal resiliency round.”

McCall added, “Severe weather events and flooding leaves families and businesses in coastal communities with financial burdens that place undue strains on municipal budgets. Part of the Trust’s mission is to help alleviate these fiscal burdens and help towns maintain quality of life for residents – which is why we are open to reconsidering requests that were made during this round.”

The Trust is a $15 million fund established by Ocean Wind 1 following its selection by the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities in June 2019 as New Jersey’s first offshore wind farm. In addition to providing funding for coastal resiliency projects, the Trust offers small, women-owned and minority-owned businesses support in reconfiguring or adapting their businesses to participate in the developing offshore wind industry, with the goal of ensuring that the offshore wind industry in New Jersey is developed in a sustainable and inclusive way.

Following the award of coastal resiliency funds, the Trustees will publish a Request for Expressions for Interest directed toward New Jersey’s small, women-owned and minority-owned businesses.

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Best fall colors in N.J.? New foliage maps show the brightest locations to visit.

In case you’re wondering how the autumn leaves are shaping up in New Jersey as we head into the fourth weekend of October, these maps will give you a glimpse of the best spots to check out.The latest fall foliage map released by the New Jersey Forest Service shows the colors are looking brilliant in most areas of Sussex and Warren counties, which have reached their peak...

In case you’re wondering how the autumn leaves are shaping up in New Jersey as we head into the fourth weekend of October, these maps will give you a glimpse of the best spots to check out.

The latest fall foliage map released by the New Jersey Forest Service shows the colors are looking brilliant in most areas of Sussex and Warren counties, which have reached their peak, and the colors are also popping in parts of Middlesex and Monmouth counties.

The maps show most counties across the Garden State that have not already reached their peak colors are getting close, classified as “near peak.”

The forest service has been posting updated maps every Friday throughout the fall season, showing the status of the leaf colors seen on trees in state parks and forests in every region of New Jersey.

Another good source to check before you hit the road to do some leaf peeping is SmokyMountains.com, which offers an interactive fall foliage prediction map for each region of the United States. (see map below) A timeline tab at the bottom of the map can be adjusted for different dates, showing when the fall foliage colors are expected to be peaking.

Another website, TheFoliageReport.com, also offers maps showing the status of fall foliage colors in each region of the United States.

As of Monday, Oct. 17, that website was reporting “moderate to high” leaf colors in the northern region of New Jersey and “low color” across central and southern New Jersey. The site’s next update is scheduled for Monday, Oct. 24.

Prior to the autumn season,some experts had predicted this year’s fall foliage season may be duller than usual in New Jersey and other regions of the eastern United States that had intense summer heat and serious drought conditions.

Despite the muted expectations, residents and park visitors have been reporting vibrant colors popping on trees in some areas of the Garden State during the past two weeks.

Current weather radar

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