Basement Waterproofing in Freehold Township

Ask Us Anything!

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Freehold Township, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

Our clients trust us because we are honest, hardworking, and efficient with every job we perform. We understand that no two basement waterproofing jobs are the same, which is why we will never give you a quote using a “cookie-cutter” approach.

Basement Waterproofing in Freehold Township

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Freehold Township:

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

Which Waterproofing Solution is Right for Me?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Get it Done Right, the First Time

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

 If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Latest News in Freehold Township

Freehold Township: Face Masks Now Optional For Students, Staff

Effective immediately, all students and staff "inhibited" by a mask won’t have to wear them through the end of the school year. FREEHOLD, NJ – Amid rising temperatures and relaxed guidance from the state, district officials from the Freehold Township School District have issued their own updated guidance on the masking rules. "School officials are empowered to relax masking among students and staff in their buildings given extreme weather conditions," Gov. Phil Murphy said at a press conference this week…

Effective immediately, all students and staff "inhibited" by a mask won’t have to wear them through the end of the school year.

FREEHOLD, NJ – Amid rising temperatures and relaxed guidance from the state, district officials from the Freehold Township School District have issued their own updated guidance on the masking rules.

"School officials are empowered to relax masking among students and staff in their buildings given extreme weather conditions," Gov. Phil Murphy said at a press conference this week, adding that the provision was one of the exceptions included in the executive order on masking in the midst of the coronavirus pandemic.

While face masks are now optional per state regulations in stores, restaurants, entertainment venues and more, those in youth summer camps, preschools, elementary and secondary schools are still required to mask up.

"This is for a simple reason: Children under the age of 12 are not yet eligible to be vaccinated," the governor has said.

"For these younger populations, we’re just not there yet."

Face masks are also required on public transportation like buses and airplanes and hubs like airports, bus terminals and train stations. Read more: Another Big Reopening Day In NJ: What You Can Do Now Amid COVID

In a June letter to parents, superintendent Neal Dickstein, announced that, effective immediately, students and staff "inhibited" by wearing a face mask can opt not to do so through the end of the school year.

"As we all have experienced, the temperature and humidity outdoors have risen, making it uncomfortable in many of our classrooms and common spaces," Dickstein wrote. "We are fortunate that our classrooms are climate controlled; however, we recognize that intense heat may impact the effectiveness of our systems. These conditions or other factors may have a negative health impact on individuals wearing a face mask."

Parents and students should note that the policy only carries through the end of the school year. The state is already preparing for what the incoming school year will look like, with schools now mandated to provide full-time, in-person instruction in September without remote learning options. As for the issue of mask requirements, the jury is still out.

"Three months from now might as well be five lifetimes in a pandemic," Murphy has said. "The answer is … our minds are open."

No. 2 Colts Neck keeps making history, pulls away late to reach 1st state final

The Colts Neck High School softball team’s magical season continues. The No. 2 Cougars blew open a close game with six runs in the sixth inning and defeated host Hammonton, 9-2, in the South/Central Group 3 semifinal on Tuesday. Colts Neck will move on to its first state final later this week – though not until it chases a Monmouth County title on Wednesday against Freehold Township. Already this season, the Cougars won their first-ever division title, reached the Shore Conference final for the first time &nd…

The Colts Neck High School softball team’s magical season continues.

The No. 2 Cougars blew open a close game with six runs in the sixth inning and defeated host Hammonton, 9-2, in the South/Central Group 3 semifinal on Tuesday.

Colts Neck will move on to its first state final later this week – though not until it chases a Monmouth County title on Wednesday against Freehold Township.

Already this season, the Cougars won their first-ever division title, reached the Shore Conference final for the first time – suffering its only loss, 3-2, to No. 1 Donovan Catholic – and captured a first-ever Central Jersey Group 3 crown.

“We’re so excited, first time in program history,” said senior ace Ava Metzger. “As we said early in our season, we’re still making school history and it’s just one day at a time now.”

Added sophomore center fielder Cassidy Relay: “Nobody expected this from us at the beginning of the season. Now everybody knows our name, and we’re going to keep moving.”

Colts Neck (26-1) will face Cranford, which started the North 2, Group 3 tournament as the No. 6 seed, in a matchup of Cinderella stories in the state final at Ivy Hill Park Friday at 3 p.m.

“They set a lot of goals to put as many banners in the gym as they can,” said Colts Neck coach Anthony Iachello. “I tell you, they don’t want to stop. Every game is just another chance to win a banner. I don’t even know who won the other game. We’re hopping a bus to Ivy Hill, and we’re going to play whoever they put in front of us.”

Hammonton (20-2) put up a fight, battling Metzger, running deep counts and fouling off a number of pitches.

The Blue Devils mostly stayed off Metzger’s riser and changeup, but she still finished with 11 strikeouts. Even without impeccable command, Metzger allowed just two hits, walked three and stuck out 11.

“We’ve had a lot of games lately and I’ve never been in this position before, but obviously I’m very confident,” said Metzger. “The nerves do kick in, but you just have to keep your composure. Not every pitch works every single time and that’s what stands out between good pitchers and great pitchers. You have to work with what you have.”

Metzger helped put her team on the board in the top of the third when she hit a deep fly ball to center field with the bases loaded and two outs that clipped off the outfielder’s glove, scoring two.

Hammonton halved the deficit in the bottom of the inning on Riley Lancaster’s RBI single, but a diving catch from Relay prevented extra damage.

“When I first saw it off the bat, I knew it would be short and I was going to have to run really hard at it,” said Relay. “It was placed where I could grab it and I just put my glove up.”

The score stayed 2-1 until the sixth, and Hammonton coach Eric Shulman was feeling like the Blue Devils still had a run in them.

But the Cougars blew the game open in the top of the sixth. The first nine batters reached base on five singles, three walks and a fielder’s choice.

“We knew (Metzger) had a good rise, we talked a lot about laying off the pitches above the belt,” said Shulman. “We were pleased with the offensive approach. She got her strikeouts, but she’s a very good pitcher. She’ll get that.

“We talked about keeping it close late and we’d give ourselves a shot. It’s 2-1 and then the wheels fell off. We knew it would have to be 2-1, 3-2. That’s what it was late, but we just couldn’t close.”

It was another offensive outburst for a Colts Neck team that seems to be swinging the bats better as the year has gone on. It is averaging nearly 10 runs per game since the start of the state and Monmouth County tournaments. Katie Finnegan finished with three hits and two RBIs, and Relay totaled two hits, a run scored and RBI.

“We’re attacking the first-pitch strike,” said Metzger, the No. 3 hitter. “We’re struggling a little with the high pitch and that’s OK, we’re learning. At this point, we just have to stay grounded and put the ball in play.”

Hammonton meanwhile ends its season after a second sectional title in the last three seasons. It has a young nucleus but will have to replace ace Makenzie Edwards, who was in the circle for both championship victories.

“With the half-day schedule, a bunch of them would take turns going to each other’s houses,” said Shulman. “They genuinely liked being around each other. The big thing is for the kids coming back next year with a big target on their back to continue to work.”

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

Bill Evans can be reached at [email protected]. Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Meet of Champions preview and picks for 2021: Girls 4×800-meter relay

After a year hiatus, the NJSIAA Meet of Champions is back on Saturday, beginning at noon at Frank Jost Field in South Plainfield. Here is our preview for the girls 4×800-meter relay. The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. LAST FIVE CHAMPIONS 2021 GROUP CHAMPIONS MEET RECORD: Freehold Township ran 9:01.69 i…

After a year hiatus, the NJSIAA Meet of Champions is back on Saturday, beginning at noon at Frank Jost Field in South Plainfield.

Here is our preview for the girls 4×800-meter relay.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

LAST FIVE CHAMPIONS

2021 GROUP CHAMPIONS

MEET RECORD: Freehold Township ran 9:01.69 in 2014 with Caitlyn Poss, Adrian Vitello, Ciara Roche and Emily Bracher. That was the last time Ridge didn’t win.

THE CONTENDERS: Haddonfield, Westfield, Colts Neck, Demarest, Cherokee

LOW SEED(S) WITH THE BEST CHANCE TO MEDAL: Ninth-seeded Ridge and 18th-seeded Union Catholic are capable of turning it up at any time. Their quartets have respective season-bests of 9:34.60 and 9:30.66. If the Vikings deploy their best unit, they could be fast enough to produce a top-five finish. As for the Red Devils, well, they’ve only won this event the last five times.

ANALYSIS: Don’t be fooled by the seeds. Haddonfield has the chance to do something special here. The lone member of the Bulldawgs ‘A’ 4×800-meter relay team who won’t be running is senior Sarah Naticchia, who will be competing in the 32000-meter run in the event prior. They ran their best 9:04.72 with Naticchia in the lineup, but the core of Lindsay and Allison Colflesh, Olivia Stoner and Payton Weiner is just as capable. No matter the sport, teams are usually their best when everyone is a senior at once. That’s the case here with Haddonfield as this quartet has one gear – fast. That meet record could be in trouble.

THE PICK: Haddonfield

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a voluntary subscription.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

HS Track: Bergen Tech 13th in Group 4 Championships

SOMERSET, NJ – Bergen County Tech finished 13th in the boys NJSIAA Group 4 Track Championships held over the weekend in Somerset. The Knights finished the meet with 16.33 points behind meet champion Southern Regional High School, who captured the meet with 54 points. East Brunswick was second with 46 points, while Ridge High School finished third with 45. Top performers for Bergen Tech were: Hackensack also competed at the meet but was shut out in the team scoring. Ciara Brown was the Comets top performer, finishing eig…

SOMERSET, NJ – Bergen County Tech finished 13th in the boys NJSIAA Group 4 Track Championships held over the weekend in Somerset. The Knights finished the meet with 16.33 points behind meet champion Southern Regional High School, who captured the meet with 54 points. East Brunswick was second with 46 points, while Ridge High School finished third with 45.

Top performers for Bergen Tech were:

Hackensack also competed at the meet but was shut out in the team scoring.

Ciara Brown was the Comets top performer, finishing eighth in the girls shot put, and 23 in the girls’ discus.

Men – Group 4 – Team Rankings – 18 Events Scored

1) Southern Regional HS 54 2) East Brunswick HS 46 3) Ridge HS 45 4) Old Bridge HS 28

5) Passaic County Tech 27 6) Eastern Regional HS 24 7) Westfield HS 23 8) Rancocas Valley Reg HS 22 9) South Brunswick HS 21 9) Montclair HS 21 11) Piscataway Twp HS 20 12) Elizabeth HS 18 13) Bergen County Tech 16.33 14) Kingsway HS 16 14) Freehold Township HS 16 16) Cherry Hill East HS 15.50 17) Mount Olive HS 15 18) Bridgewater-Raritan HS 14 18) Egg Harbor Twp HS 14 20) Hillsborough HS 12 21) Montgomery HS 10 22) North Hunterdon HS 9 22) Millville HS 9 24) Union HS 8.33 25) North Brunswick HS 6 25) East Orange Campus 6 25) Clifton HS 6 25) Hunterdon Central HS 6 25) Lenape Regional HS 6 30) Randolph HS 5 31) Toms River North HS 4 31) Howell HS 4 33) North Bergen HS 2.33 34) Watchung Hills Reg. HS 2 34) Jackson Memorial HS 2 36) Ridgewood HS 1.50 37) Washington Twp HS 1 37) Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS 1 37) J F Kennedy HS – Paterson 1

Women – Group 4 – Team Rankings – 18 Events Scored

1) Egg Harbor Twp HS 56 2) Scotch Plains-Fanwood HS 41 3) West Orange HS 37 4) Westfield HS 30 4) Union HS 30 6) Hillsborough HS 29 7) Montgomery HS 26 8) Montclair HS 23 9) Millville HS 20 9) Eastern Regional HS 20 11) Howell HS 19 12) Fair Lawn HS 18 12) Hunterdon Central HS 18 14) Ridge HS 16 15) Clifton HS 15 15) Cherokee HS 15 17) North Brunswick HS 14 17) North Hunterdon HS 14 19) Plainfield HS 12 19) Ridgewood HS 12 21) Columbia HS 10 22) South Brunswick HS 9 23) Atlantic County Tech 8 24) Freehold Township HS 7 24) Brick Memorial HS 7 24) Rancocas Valley Reg HS 7 27) Franklin Township HS 6 27) Toms River North HS 6 27) Randolph HS 6 27) Piscataway Twp HS 6 31) Southern Regional HS 4 31) Elizabeth HS 4 31) Passaic County Tech 4 34) Mount Olive HS 2 34) East Brunswick HS 2 34) Williamstown HS 2 37) Washington Twp HS 1 37) Watchung Hills Reg. HS 1 37) Old Bridge HS 1

GIRLS ATHLETE PLACE
BOYS
HIGH JUMP
Jun-00 Jordan Nelson 4th
TRIPLE JUMP
JAVELIN
132-10 Cole Christiana 21st
DISCUS
11.49 Brandon Balcacer 23rd
LONG JUMP
19-7.5 Walter King Jr. 17th
DISCUS
122-1 Elijah Abaogye 18th
JAVELIN
46-1.5 Hassan Bailey 16th

Piscataway lawsuit opens new front in fights against warehouse sprawl

Public concern over warehouse sprawl in New Jersey took a new turn as a dozen residents and two community groups in Piscataway, Middlesex County, sued the township’s zoning board, saying it had been “arbitrary and capricious” in approving a plan for almost 900,000 square feet of warehouse development. The warehouse plan would add truck traffic and air pollution in an area that already gets low marks for air quality from the American Lung Association, they claim in their lawsuit. The extra pollution would add to the b…

Public concern over warehouse sprawl in New Jersey took a new turn as a dozen residents and two community groups in Piscataway, Middlesex County, sued the township’s zoning board, saying it had been “arbitrary and capricious” in approving a plan for almost 900,000 square feet of warehouse development.

The warehouse plan would add truck traffic and air pollution in an area that already gets low marks for air quality from the American Lung Association, they claim in their lawsuit. The extra pollution would add to the burdens of the local community, which is deemed an “environmental justice” community and some 75% of whose population are people of color.

The lawsuit argues that the zoning board was wrong to approve development of a 25-acre site zoned as “rural/residential,” and said that fumes from 60 truck bays would hurt children and staff at an adjoining elementary school.

The suit is believed to be the first example of a community legal challenge to a surge in warehouse construction in New Jersey spurred by a scramble for space by developers responding to a huge increase in demand for goods ordered online.

READ: Will NJ lose ground to warehouse sprawl?

READ: Sweeney says warehouse projects need regional approval

It follows a bill recently introduced in the Legislature that seeks to curb warehouse sprawl by requiring towns to seek approval from neighboring municipalities before issuing permits for warehouse developments. Disputes would be resolved by county or state planning boards.

Fears for already scarce open space

And the suit reflects concerns that the current proliferation of warehouses, with the expectation of more to come, is eating into already scarce open space in America’s most densely populated state and industrializing its remaining rural corners.

In the first quarter of 2021, the total area of leased warehouse space in northern and central New Jersey grew by 11.1 million square feet from a year earlier, the biggest quarterly gain in 20 years, according to a survey by Newmark, a commercial real estate firm.

In the lawsuit, filed last month, the plaintiffs argue that the Piscataway Township Zoning Board of Adjustment failed to justify a variance to the existing zoning, and failed to demonstrate that the variance can be issued without detriment to the public good.

The plaintiffs say the board approved the plan even though the warehouses would be almost 50 feet tall, some 15 feet higher than the height limit under existing zoning regulations. And it says the new buildings would cover almost 37% of the site, well in excess of the 20% allowed under current regulations.

The suit asks the Superior Court to declare the board’s approval null and void, and to deny the warehouse application by the developer, M&M Realty.

Two warehouses totaling about 360,000 square feet would be built on the site, in place of existing single-family residences, now vacant, that would be demolished, according to the application. The remainder of the site would provide parking for 363 cars and 60 trucks.

Impact on air quality, children’s health

“We strongly believe that the developer failed to provide, and the board failed to consider, a comprehensive list of pros and cons,” said Kamuela Tillman, one of the plaintiffs. “The board did not take the impact on our air quality or our children’s health into consideration at all.”

The warehouses would be built next to the Randolphville Elementary School, which houses some 500 students from kindergarten through third grade, plus 50 teachers and staff, the plaintiffs said in a statement. They said Piscataway is designated as an overburdened community by New Jersey’s new environmental justice law, and already has an F rating for air quality from the American Lung Association.

Syed Shoaib, another plaintiff, accused local officials of ignoring the need for environmental justice, as identified by the state’s new law on the issue. “NJ is moving towards protecting communities, like Piscataway, that have been harmed by environmental racism. Our local officials should be protecting the environment and addressing climate change, not building warehouses near schools,” he said.

The two community groups that joined the plaintiff list are the Piscataway Progressive Democratic Organization and the Piscataway Youth Progressive Organization.

A statewide list of overburdened communities compiled by the Department of Environmental Protection, as required by the environmental justice law, identifies 30 in Piscataway Township with up to 55% of the population classified as low-income.

The law defines an overburdened community as one where at least 35% of households qualify as low-income; at least 40% identify as a minority or as members of a tribe, and at least 40% have limited English proficiency.

Open letter to zoning board

The parcel adjoins a residential area and has access to highways only via residential streets, the residents said in an earlier open letter to the zoning board. They argued that the site provides an air-quality “buffer” for other recent warehouse developments in Piscataway.

Jim Kinneally, an attorney for the zoning board, said the board had good reasons for allowing a variance that would permit the warehouses to be built.

“The applicant provided significant expert testimony to justify the relief that they sought,” he said, referring to the variance. “I believe that the board’s decision is based on sound legal ground, and I think it’s likely to be upheld by the court.”

A representative for M&M Realty said it is company policy not to comment on pending legal matters.

Micah Rasmussen, a Rider University professor who earlier this year led a successful community campaign against a planned warehouse in Upper Freehold Township, Monmouth County, said it’s unfortunate that communities must take legal action in an attempt to curb warehouse development. He predicted that the Piscataway plaintiffs will have a “solid shot” at winning their case, since courts tend to favor established zoning laws.

Rasmussen said warehouse applications should be subject to regional or statewide planning so that permission to build them would be subject to an overall strategy rather than to local planning boards that may be attracted to the extra taxation dollars that the developments bring — with little regard for the impact on neighboring communities, which may not want nearby warehouse development.

“If being careful and deliberate about our state’s remaining undeveloped land is a statewide policy goal, then local planning and zoning boards ought to be able to make decisions on the basis of whether an application supports it or not,” he said.

But Jim Gilbert, a former head of the New Jersey State Planning Commission, predicted that the plaintiffs “have their work cut out” because of a “mish-mosh” of uncoordinated land-use policy in New Jersey. He estimated that some 70% of development is determined by boards of adjustment, which he said often look for ways of undoing local master plans that were put in place by planning boards.

“Good luck to the objectors in Piscataway,” Gilbert said. “The prospects are not good.”

READ: The pandemic is fueling warehouse sprawl in NJ

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes “Fair Use” of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.