BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Freehold Township

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Freehold Township, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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mold removal rem
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Basement Waterproofing in Freehold Township

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Freehold Township:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Freehold Township

NJ teachers brace for more COVID trauma as pandemic lengthens

TRENTON – Take the regular societal challenges that lead to educational inequities in New Jersey, layer on COVID-related issues that aggravate those problems, and you’ve got the conditions for an even more imbalanced state school system.Then add to that the coronavirus delta variant that has dimmed the light at the lengthening pandemic tunnel and the complications teachers face in the approaching school year get compounded.The state Department of Education held its third annual Statewide Equity Conference online Tue...

TRENTON – Take the regular societal challenges that lead to educational inequities in New Jersey, layer on COVID-related issues that aggravate those problems, and you’ve got the conditions for an even more imbalanced state school system.

Then add to that the coronavirus delta variant that has dimmed the light at the lengthening pandemic tunnel and the complications teachers face in the approaching school year get compounded.

The state Department of Education held its third annual Statewide Equity Conference online Tuesday. While many of the workshops focused on how to assess and address racial disparities, the trauma on students and families caused by the pandemic was also top of mind.

“All the stuff that they’ve been through, and now it’s going to continue this year, right?” said Neel Desai, principal of Grandview Elementary School in Piscataway. “First we thought it going to be just a few weeks. Then a year. And now we’re almost at 18 months, and it’s probably going to continue.”

Desai said the COVID-related impacts last school year included food insecurity, deaths in students’ immediate or extended families, job losses for parents and others. He tried to address it with home visits to families and deliveries of needed supplies.

“Those families plus all the other ones that maybe they could have been OK for a little while, but now because of the extent of it, because of how long it’s going to be, maybe they’re not going to be and they need more support from us,” Desai said.

Robyn Klim, director of educational services for the Freehold Township School District, noted the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention now recommends masks in indoor public places in all New Jersey counties except Warren. The CDC also suggests masks in all K-12 school settings, though in New Jersey that decision is currently being left to school districts.

“The delta variant still continues to haunt us, and we are certainly not out of this,” said Klim, who said teachers now have to figure out a way to move forward.

“The pandemic is absolutely a contributor to emotional harm,” she said. “In fact, it’s been estimated as of last January that $1.58 trillion are going to be spent on recuperating emotionally with the mental health backlash of the pandemic.”

Klim said teaching professionals with resources have suffered due to the pandemic and that it’s safe to assume it’s been worse for families with far less.

“Ages 18 to 35, in a study conducted, 43% of adults experienced high rates of loneliness during the pandemic,” Klim said. “Now imagine our families returning to us – our families returning after they felt anxious, scared and depressed.”

Angel Santiago, who teaches at Loring Elementary School in Blackwood and is the current New Jersey State Teacher of the Year, said teachers should strive to build a classroom environment and culture that’s safe for students, so they feel appreciated.

“This will be especially important as we return to in-person learning. We can create healing spaces in our schools,” Santiago said.

“We know that the pandemic has hit our students in so many different ways. Those families and students already struggling have had their health, social and economic situations amplified by this pandemic,” he said. “We must acknowledge and offer remediation for this trauma before we can expect any academic results.”

Klim said teachers should brace themselves for what they’re likely to hear from students as they spend full school days with them, in some places for the first time since March 2020. She said in normal times, schools are the top reporting entity to the state Division of Child Protection and Permanency.

“And the schools have not been open enough to really be that lens on reporting,” Klim said. “So, as our children return to us, we do expect the stories to be told, right? And the children are going to be sharing how their experiences were. So, you really have to be armed with your child study teams and your helpers in the district to make sure that you have the supports available.”

Michael Symons is State House bureau chief for New Jersey 101.5. Contact him at [email protected].

New Director Named for Student Counseling Services

For the second time this year the Princeton Public Schools has tapped a Franklin Township administrator to fill a vacancy. Dana Karas has been selected to serve as the director of student counseling services for the Princeton Public Schools. Karas worked for the past eight years as director of school counseling in the Franklin Township Public Schools, as well as supervisor of world languages for Grades 9 through 12.Earlier this year Princeton had hired Frank Chmiel, formerly principal of Franklin High School, as the new Princeton High...

For the second time this year the Princeton Public Schools has tapped a Franklin Township administrator to fill a vacancy. Dana Karas has been selected to serve as the director of student counseling services for the Princeton Public Schools. Karas worked for the past eight years as director of school counseling in the Franklin Township Public Schools, as well as supervisor of world languages for Grades 9 through 12.

Earlier this year Princeton had hired Frank Chmiel, formerly principal of Franklin High School, as the new Princeton High School principal. Karas replaces Kristina Donovan, who left the district this summer.

Karas, who graduated from the University of Delaware with a bachelors degree in French Education, has graduate degrees from the College of New Jersey and Georgian Court College. She is currently completing her doctorate in Educational Leadership from Kean University.

Early in her career, Karas worked as a middle school French teacher in Princeton. She later worked as a French teacher at the Manalapan- Englishtown Middle School and as a school counselor at Churchill Junior High School in East Brunswick. In 1998 she became a school counselor at Freehold Township High School, a post she held until 2003 when she returned to Princeton High School as a school counselor. She then served as supervisor of guidance and classic and world languages and later as supervisor of guidance, careers, and alternative programming in the Lawrence Township Public Schools.

“It gives me great pleasure to welcome Ms. Karas back to Princeton Public Schools,” said Carol Kelley, superintendent of schools. “She has impressive experience in school counseling as well as expertise related to students’ social-emotional health and well-being.”

Karas has served as president of the New Jersey School Counselor Association (NJSCA) and continues to serve as an executive board member for the organization, where she has co-authored the state’s current approved school counselor evaluation model. In 2017 she was named New Jersey School Counselor of the Year, representing the state at a White House celebration. As a committee member under the auspices of the New Jersey Department of Education, she contributed to the creation of the state’s Social-Emotional Learning competencies and also served on the On-Ramps to College initiative.

“I feel truly blessed and honored to be returning to Princeton Public Schools,” said Karas. “I am looking forward to supporting the school counseling staff and each and every child in the district.”

NJ Little League: 2021 State Tournament Guide, Schedule, Results

Teams from the Jersey Shore and South Jersey and two from Bergen County are headed to the Joe Graziano New Jersey Little League State Tournament in Cherry Hill.Six of the last seven state championships have been won by Jersey Shore teams. This year's representative from the Shore is District 18 and Section 3 champion Toms River East.Also competing are Haddonfield, Teaneck and Hillsdale.Last year's state champion, Brick (District 18, Section 3), did not get to move on, with the Little League postseason endi...

Teams from the Jersey Shore and South Jersey and two from Bergen County are headed to the Joe Graziano New Jersey Little League State Tournament in Cherry Hill.

Six of the last seven state championships have been won by Jersey Shore teams. This year's representative from the Shore is District 18 and Section 3 champion Toms River East.

Also competing are Haddonfield, Teaneck and Hillsdale.

Last year's state champion, Brick (District 18, Section 3), did not get to move on, with the Little League postseason ending at the state level due to the pandemic.

But the format has returned to normal for 2021. The New Jersey champion will move on to Bristol, Connecticut, for the Mid-Atlantic tournament; that winner finishes the season at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

Here's what you need to know:

TEAMS

New Jersey is divided into four sections for the annual state tournament.

Section 1 covers the North and Northwest part of the state and will be represented by Hillsdale Little League.

Section 2 covers the Northeast part of the state and will be represented by Teaneck Southern Little League

Section 3 covers Central New Jersey and is represented by Toms River East Little League.

Section 4 covers the Southern part of the state and is represented Haddonfield Little League

Stay with APP.com for more Little League baseball updates this summer.

Here is a better idea, get a digital subscription right now so you don't miss anything.

HOW TO GET THERE

Cherry Hill American Little League and District 13 are this year's hosts of the 2021 New Jersey Joe Graziano State Tournament. All games will be played at Cherry Hill American Little League

For GPS purposes use: 200 Oakdale Rd, Cherry Hill, NJ 08034.

From Hillsdale: Take Garden State Park South to NJ Turnpike South. Take NJ Turnpike South (I-95) to exit 4. Take Route 73 North to I-295 South to exit 32. Take a left on North Valley Road. Take a left on Valleybrook Road East. Take a left onto Oakdale Road. Take a right to continue on Oakdale Road to 200 Oakdale Road.

From Teaneck: Take NJ Turnpike South (I-95) to exit 4. Take Route 73 North to I-295 South to exit 32. Take a left on North Valley Road. Take a left on Valleybrook Road East. Take a left onto Oakdale Road. Take a right to continue on Oakdale Road to 200 Oakdale Road.

From Toms River: Take Route 37 West to Route 70 West to I-295 South. Take I-295 South to exit 32. Take a left on North Valley Road. Take a left on Valleybrook Road East. Take a left onto Oakdale Road. Take a right to continue on Oakdale Road to 200 Oakdale Road.

From Haddonfield: Take Haddonfield-Berlin Road South to Ashbrook Road. Take a right on Ashbrook Road. Take a left onto Oakdale Road. Take a right to continue on Oakdale Road to 200 Oakdale Road.

SCHEDULE

Thursday, July 29

Game 1: Toms River East 1, Hillsdale 0

Game 2: Teaneck Southern 6, Haddonfield 5

Game Story:NJ Little League: ‘Superb defense’ from Toms River East locks up nail-biting win over Hillsdale

Game Story:Little League: Haddonfield's state title hopes take a hit with Teaneck's improbable comeback

Friday, July 30

Game 3: Hillsdale 10, Haddonfield 6 (5 1/2 innings)

Game 4: Toms River East 10, Teaneck Southern 2 (8 innings)

Saturday, July 31

Game 5: Hillsdale 6, Teaneck Southern 5

Sunday, August 1

Game 6: Toms River East 8, Hillsdale 4

RECENT HISTORY

Here are the New Jersey Little League State Champions since 2000.

2021: Toms River East - Toms River East wins Little League state title

2020: Brick

2015: Jackson - Jackson wins state title with walk-off home run

2013: East Greenwich

2012: Par Troy East

2011: Paramus

2010: Toms River National

2009: Somerset Hills

2008: Bordentown

2007: Randolph East

2006: Livingston American

2005: Toms River American

2004: HTRBA

2003: Freehold Township American

2002: Nottingham

2001: Randolph West

2000: Pequannock

PITCHING RULES FOR LITTLE LEAGUE BASEBALL

The biggest decision each manager will make prior to the start of the tournament is who will be the starting pitcher for each team's first game. Depending how that starting pitcher is doing, each manager will have to balance two lines of thinking: either have their "ace" complete Thursday's game and more than likely not have that pitcher available for the rest of the tournament depending on how many pitches the starter throws or pulling their ace early if a team has a comfortable lead or is losing by a lot and start using the bullpen, which would save the "ace" for later in the tournament.

Here is the fine print on the pitching rules for Little League.

A manager must remove the pitcher when said pitcher reaches the limit for his/her age group (it is 85 pitches for the 12-year-olds). But the pitcher may remain in the game at another position: Exception: If a pitcher reaches the limit imposed in Regulation VI (c) for his/her league age while facing a batter, the pitcher may continue to pitch until any one of the following conditions occurs: 1. That batter reaches base; 2. That batter is put out; 3. The third out is made to complete the half-inning. Note 1: A pitcher who delivers 41 or more pitches in a game cannot play the position of catcher for the remainder of that day. Note 2: Any player who has played the position of catcher in four or more innings in a game is not eligible to pitch on that calendar day.

Pitchers league age 14 and under must adhere to the following rest requirements:

If a player pitches 66 or more pitches in a day, four (4) calendar days of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 36-50 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 21-35 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 1-20 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest is required

Sherlon Christie is a sports reporter at the Asbury Park Press and has covered sports at the Jersey Shore since 2004. Don't miss any of his coverage by subscribing at https://subscribe.app.com/. You can contact him via e-mail at [email protected], on Twitter at https://twitter.com/sherlonapp, on Facebook at https://www.facebook.com/sherlonapp and on Instagram at https://www.instagram.com/sherlon_christie

Ready for the Paralympics? Here's a complete list of Paralympians with New Jersey ties

When the Paralympics begin on August 24, New Jersey will be represented in multiple sports and events.However, the Garden State doesn't have the most athletes. Just like during the Olympics, that honor falls to California, with 25 among the 240 athletes formally introduced on August 4.The Garden State mi...

When the Paralympics begin on August 24, New Jersey will be represented in multiple sports and events.

However, the Garden State doesn't have the most athletes. Just like during the Olympics, that honor falls to California, with 25 among the 240 athletes formally introduced on August 4.

The Garden State might not bring home the most medals, either. But there's plenty of Paralympic spirit from Alpine to Cape May.

Meet the athletes at the 2021 Paralympics in Japan with ties back to New Jersey.

Lisa Banta Czechowski

Goalball

One of just four current Paralympians to compete in six Games, Czechowski won a silver in discus in 2000, and has since claimed gold, silver and bronze with USA Goalball. Czechowski, who is visually impaired, played Little League softball in Boonton, and was a high school thrower. She and her husband, USA Goalball head coach Jake Czechowski, and their 7-year-old son Jay, live in Fort Wayne, Indiana.

Robert Griswold

Swimming

Griswold, who grew up in Freehold and trains at Carson-Newman University in Tennessee, has made the Paralympic team for the second time.

He competed in five events in Rio and earned a bronze medal in the 100-meter backstroke. He’s also medaled nine times at the World Championships, earning three golds, four silvers and two bronzes.

At Freehold Township High School, Griswold competed against able-bodied swimmers and placed 11th in the backstroke at the Shore Conference Championships.

Ray Hennagir

Wheelchair rugby

A combat engineer in the U.S. Marine Corps from Deptford, Hennagir was wounded by an improvised explosive device in Iraq on June 16, 2007, leading to the amputation of both legs and four fingers on his left hand.

A therapist at Walter Reed Army Medical Center urged him to try wheelchair basketball. He has won four gold medals – two in wheelchair basketball and two for sitting volleyball – at the Warrior Games.

After 12 years on the courts, Hennagir was recruited onto the national wheelchair rugby team.

Track and field

Born in Passaic, Iannotta, 27, graduated from Garfield High School in 2012 and studied history at Bergen Community College. Iannotta, who trains with the New Jersey Navigators, is a two-time Paralympian who won gold in the 100 meters and bronze in the 400 meters in Rio in 2016.

Raymond Martin

Track and field

Martin, a Jersey City native, won six golds and one silver on the track in Rio and London. The first man to win five individual world titles at a single Paralympic event, Martin was born with a congenital disorder known as arthrogryposis that affects joint flexibility from his ankles to his neck. He got his first racing chair in kindergarten, and began competing in his late teens. A graduate of Hudson County Prep and the University of Illinois, he plans to pursue a career as a physician’s assistant.

Brian Siemann

Track and field

A three-time Paralympian, Siemann has competed in races from the 100 meters to the marathon.

A quadruplet with three sisters, Siemann was paralyzed from the waist down at birth. He grew up in Millstone, and graduated from Notre Dame in Lawrenceville, where he was introduced to track and field as a freshman.

Siemann works as a teaching assistant at the University of Illinois, where he earned his bachelor's and master's degree.

John Tanguay

Rowing

A Hopewell Valley and Columbia University alumnus, Tanguay will row the PR3 mixed four with coxswain. The same crew earned silver at the 2019 World Rowing Championships in Linz, Austria. Born with clubfoot, Tanguay rowed in the first varsity boat during his sophomore season, then was 2V during his junior and senior seasons.

Daryl Walker

Goalball

With USA Goalball, Walker won a silver medal in Rio and placed fourth in Beijing in 2008. Hoboken born but raised in Jacksonville, Florida, Walker has albinism, which causes a lack of pigmentation in the eyes. He tried goalball in a phys ed class at the Florida School for the Deaf and the Blind.

Jane Havsy is a sports reporter for DailyRecord.com. For full access to live scores, breaking news and analysis, subscribe today.

Danny LoGiudice and Gene Myers contributed to this report.

Who are the Top 50 returning girls soccer assist leaders in 2021?

There are some serious playmakers returning across the state and today, NJ Advance Media takes a look at the top assist leaders that return in 2021.The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday. TOP 50 - RETURNING ASSISTS LEADERSEmma Petrolia, New Milford, Sr. - 19Kylie Casper, Schalick, Sr. - 18Sofia Vinasco, Montclair Kim...

There are some serious playmakers returning across the state and today, NJ Advance Media takes a look at the top assist leaders that return in 2021.

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now and be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care about, straight to your inbox each weekday.

TOP 50 - RETURNING ASSISTS LEADERS

Emma Petrolia, New Milford, Sr. - 19

Kylie Casper, Schalick, Sr. - 18

Sofia Vinasco, Montclair Kimberley, Jr. - 18

Hope Slimmer, Ocean City, Sr. - 18

Maresa Savarese, Schalick, Sr. - 15

Natalie Rufino, Nutley, Sr. - 15

Bella Douglas, Montclair Kimberley, Jr. - 14

Kaitlyn Samuels, Pennsville, Sr. - 14

Anthea Iglesia, Dwight-Morrow, Sr. - 13

Anna Torppey, Veritas Christian, Sr. - 13

Layla Nurid-Din Flores, Clifton, Jr. - 12

Tatum Devault, Woodstown, Jr. - 12

Alexandra Lipshutz, Metuchen, Jr. - 12

Sophia Gambuti, Passaic Tech, Sr. - 12

Jayda Shehadi, Oakcrest, Sr. - 12

Henna Andican, Mountain Lakes, Sr. - 12

Kerry Perez, Park Ridge, Sr. - 12

Angela Maino, Bayonne, Jr. - 11

Sarah Harnett, High Point, Sr. - 11

Emily Jozak, Wayne Valley, Sr. - 11

Katie Vassilakos, Holmdel, Sr. - 11

Morgan Cupo, Red Bank Catholic, Sr. - 11

Alexis Barrow, Ramsey, Jr. - 10

Sydney Hansen, Hawthorne, So. - 10

Madison Krakower, DePaul, Jr. - 10

Kiersten Brown, Wall, Jr. - 10

Emma Letizia, Passaic Tech, Sr. - 10

Kelsey Ramos, Wayne Valley, Sr. - 10

Ruby Conroy, Hawthorne, Sr. - 10

Lauren McCall, Schalick, Jr. - 10

Jenna Maher, Rahway, So. - 9

Gabbie Dittus, Oakcrest, So. - 9

Sophie Berman, Robbinsville, Sr. - 9

Abby Crispin, Kearny, Sr. - 9

Paige Droner, Chatham, Jr. - 9

Lia Cruz, North Arlington, So. - 9

Erin Eustace, Metuchen, Jr. - 9

Noel Pauwels, Red Bank Catholic, Jr. - 9

Gabriella Wysocki, Wardlaw-Hartridge, Jr. - 9

Sonia Neighbors, Montclair, Jr. - 9

Heather Riess, J.P. Stevens, Jr. - 9

Merin Boucher, Metuchen, Sr. - 9

Maya Espinel, McNair, Sr. - 9

Olivia Giordano, Millville, Sr. 9

Mia Agresti, Shore, Sr. - 9

Jadyn Liebman, Livingston, Sr. - 9

Abby Nadjzinowicz, Red Bank Catholic, Sr. - 9

Emily Holzer, Demarest, Sr. - 9

Xochilt Turijan, Hudson Catholic, Sr. - 8

Katie DeGaetano, North Brunswick, So. - 8

Alexis Garcia, Toms River North, So. - 8

Isabell Kronow, Somerville, So. - 8

Cassidy Corcione, Freehold Township, So. - 8

Sarah Slowikowski, Demarest, Jr. - 8

Y’aaliyah Bryan, Hudson Catholic, Jr. - 8

Claire Bucca, Tenafly, Jr. - 8

Arianna Alves, Science Park, Jr. - 8

Emily Horvaht, Kearny, Jr. - 8

Reese Strodt, Delaware Valley, Jr. - 8

Charlotte Breen, Metuchen, Jr. - 8

Gianna McDermott, Paramus, Jr. - 8

Alexandra White, Hoboken, Jr. - 8

Kacy Smith, West Morris, Sr. - 8

Olivia Hoover, Glen Ridge, Sr. - 8

Micaiah Croce, Gloucester Tech, Sr. - 8

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