BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Freehold borough

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Freehold borough, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

waterproofing and protection from rain
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
foundation-repairn
mold removal rem
realty services
installation waterprofing

Basement Waterproofing in Freehold borough

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Freehold borough:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Freehold borough

Many NJ Shore school districts dropping mask mandate for fall. Lakewood is different

Many Shore school district leaders say they plan to make face masks optional this fall following Gov. Phil Murphy\'s announcement that it will be up to local officials to decide.Several school leaders said they already had chosen to do so, while some are still deciding, following the governor\'s guidance on the issue...

Many Shore school district leaders say they plan to make face masks optional this fall following Gov. Phil Murphy\'s announcement that it will be up to local officials to decide.

Several school leaders said they already had chosen to do so, while some are still deciding, following the governor\'s guidance on the issue Monday.

“Just like how we ended this past school year, masks will be optional for staff and students,” Superintendent Leroy Seitz of the Holmdel school district, which has 2,900 students, said via email.

Background:Masks will not be mandatory in NJ schools this September unless districts want them

Mary Ellen Walker, superintendent of the 9,500-student Middletown Public Schools, said the school board had adopted a plan June 22 that included optional masking: “As stated in the plan, mask wearing for all students, staff and visitors will be optional unless required by law. At present, there is no legal mandate for mask wearing in school.”

But at least one district, Lakewood Public Schools, is instituting tight restrictions that will require masks on all students and staff, temperature checks before entering school buildings and boarding buses, and plastic dividers on every desk.

Lakewood, which has 5,600 students, also plans to make plastic shields available for both staff and students and provide each student with a cloth face masks, according to a 153-page reopening plan issued in June that also touted the benefits of in-class learning and claimed children have a lower infection rate.

“The best available evidence from countries that have opened schools indicates that COVID-19 poses low risks to school-aged children,” the Lakewood plan stated. “At least in areas with low community transmission and suggests that children are unlikely to be major drivers of the spread of the virus.”

The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention has not updated its mask guidance for schools for fall. For now, it recommends schools continue to require "universal and correct use of masks," according to the most recent guidance.

Lakewood kept schools open for the entire 2020-2021 school year with tight restrictions even as the Lakewood community saw some of the highest infection rates in the state and remains among the lowest-vaccinated municipalities.

Just about 32% of Lakewood residents were vaccinated as of June 4. That compares to a statewide vaccination rate of more than 60%, according to state data.

At the same time, Lakewood, the fifth-largest municipality in the state, recorded 13,721 COVID cases as of June 25.

Lakewood School officials did not respond to requests for comment Wednesday

Murphy announced that New Jersey school districts could decide for themselves if students have to wear masks indoors beginning in September, ending the statewide mask mandate for all schools.

But it keeps the masking requirement in place for school buses.

The announcement was a reversal of Murphy\'s stance from just last month, when he said most elementary and middle school students would likely be required to wear masks at least at the beginning of the next academic year, when K-12 schools return to full-time, in-person learning.

The mask mandate has been a flashpoint for controversy throughout New Jersey, as parents, students and others pressured local school leaders and Murphy to relent on face coverings.

Some districts had gone to mask-less learning in the final weeks of the 2020-2021 school year when the governor made an exception due to excessive heat, allowing districts to decide if the masks posed a health concern when temperature surpassed 90 degrees.

More:Jersey Shore school districts quick to dump mask mandates after Murphy changes rules

Among those that had already allowed students to attend without masks was the Jackson School District, according to Superintendent Nicole Pormilli. She said the restriction had been lifted as of June 9 and will continue in the fall.

“We feel the optional route is a safe route so that those who are worried have the option to wear it,” Pormilli said in an interview. “It is important so that those who are concerned have the option to keep themselves safe.”

Pormili said a recent survey of parents in the 8,600-student district found that 75% wanted the choice to send students to class without masks.

She added that forcing students to wear masks for hours can be detrimental: “We also have to keep in mind the mental health component, for students to wear a mask all day long, that can be a concern.”

Neal Dickstein, superintendent of the Freehold Township School District’s 3,700 students, stressed that the busing mask requirement is still important, but all other areas will ease restrictions: “Our intent is that masking will be optional in all locations except the school bus where it will be mandatory.”

Next door, in the Freehold Borough Schools, Superintendent Rocco Tomazic said he will follow the optional approach since the governor now allows it. But he offered concern that with no vaccines available for those under 12 years of age yet, hundreds of his students will still be vulnerable.

“The vast number of my students are not vaccinated,” said Tomazic, who said only 678 of his 1,640 students are 12 or older. “So we have to make sure that if those students come to school wearing a mask, they don’t feel like strangers. Our recommendation is that they continue to wear them if they are not vaccinated.”

But there are a handful of districts yet to decide if they will require masks or not. Those include Toms River Regional Schools, the largest among shore communities with 15,000 students, and Old Bridge, which has an enrollment of 8,600.

More:Monmouth University will require vaccinations and classroom masks for fall semester

School leaders in both locations, however, expected a mask-less policy to eventually be put in place.

“I think it is premature to make a firm decision at this point,” Old Bridge Superintendent Jared Rumage said via email. “However, we are eager and hopeful to return in September as a mask-optional environment pending any extraordinary circumstances.”

Tom Gianella, Toms River superintendent, offered a similar prediction: “This will be a board decision and I cannot speak for the board. With that being said, I do not see any board member, as of now, in favor of masking students next year.”

Joe Strupp is an award-winning journalist with 30 years’ experience who covers education and several local communities for APP.com and the Asbury Park Press. He is also the author of two books, including "Killing Journalism" on the state of the news media, and an adjunct media professor at Rutgers University and Fairleigh Dickinson University. Reach him at [email protected] and at 732-413-3840. Follow him on Twitter at @joestrupp

Here is where to watch July 4th fireworks in Monmouth, Ocean counties in 2021 - UPDATED

Editor\'s note: While this list is up to date, be sure to check the town\'s website or Facebook page for any last minute changes.What is it about fireworks that we love so much?Is it the colors? The boom? The suspense of searching the skies, waiting to see where the next explosion will take place?Or maybe it\'s that we save them for special occasions, gathering together to gaze upward and just ... watch.This summer, there will be plenty of chances to "ooh!" and "ahh" at ...

Editor\'s note: While this list is up to date, be sure to check the town\'s website or Facebook page for any last minute changes.

What is it about fireworks that we love so much?

Is it the colors? The boom? The suspense of searching the skies, waiting to see where the next explosion will take place?

Or maybe it\'s that we save them for special occasions, gathering together to gaze upward and just ... watch.

This summer, there will be plenty of chances to "ooh!" and "ahh" at the Shore, as fireworks are planned for Fourth of July and beyond (plus a few before). Below is a list of fireworks displays, arranged alphabetically by town. If you\'d rather search by date, click here.

More:There\'s plenty of things to do in NJ this summer. Our guide covers it all

Aberdeen: 9 p.m. July 9, Veterans\' Memorial Park, Ocean Boulevard and Lakeshore Drive in the Cliffwood Beach section. Go: 732-583-4200, @Aberdeentwp on Facebook.

Beach Haven: July 4 at dusk, Bay Village, 9th and Bay avenues, Beach Haven, on the bay. Rain date is July 5. Go: 609-492-2800; bayvillagelbi.com

Belmar: Postponed. From belmar.com: "The Belmar fireworks display scheduled for July 2nd with a rain date of July 3rd is postponed due to the weather forecast for this weekend. Follow us on social media and our website for the announcement of a new date." Go: belmar.com

Berkeley Township: June 23, as part of the "Sounds Of Summer" concert series in Veterans\' Park in the Bayville section. Music begins at 6 p.m., fireworks at 9 p.m. There also will be fireworks at 9 p.m. Sept. 11, part of the Berkeley Township Community Pride Day. Go: twp.berkeley.nj.us/index.php.

More:Find the best Jersey Shore restaurants this summer with our guide

Bradley Beach: The fireworks scheduled for July 3 have been postponed. In a statement, the town says it hopes to announce a future date shortly. Go: 732-776-2999; bradleybeachnj.gov.

Brick Township: July 8, 15 and 22 as part of SummerFest 2021 at Windward Beach Park, 265 Princeton Ave. Live music at 7 p.m., plus food trucks and a beer and wine garden, followed by fireworks. Complimentary shuttle bus runs from local schools. Go: 732-262-1044; bricktownship.net.

Freehold Borough: There will be no fireworks in the borough this year.

Freehold Township: 9:15 p.m. July 10, part of Freehold Township Day, a celebration of veterans, in Michael J. Tighe Park, 65 Georgia Road. Car show, music, free children\'s rides, free teen center with DJ. Car show starts at 3 p.m., festival from 4 to 11 p.m. Go: freeholdtownshipday.com.

Hazlet: July 3, Veterans Memorial Park. Rain date is July 5. Go: hazlettwp.org

Holmdel: July 7 at Bell Works, 101 Crawfords Corner Road. Watch from the surrounding parking lots. Rain date is July 8. Go:bell.works.

Jackson: July 10 at "Food Trucks & Fireworks," 3 to 9 p.m. at John F. Johnson Junior Memorial Park, 260 Kierych Memorial Drive. Admission is free; event includes live music and food trucks. Go: Great Adventure, 732-928-1821; sixflags.com/greatadventure. Jackson Recreation Department, 732-928-1260; jacksontwpnj.net.

Lacey: July 3 at Lacey High School, 73 Haines St. in the Lanoka Harbor section. Live music by White Rabbit begins at 7:30 p.m. Fireworks start at 9:15 p.m. Rain date is July 5. Go: 609-693-1100, ext. 2203; laceytownship.org.

Lakehurst: There will be no fireworks this year.

Lakewood: Fireworks are scheduled after Jersey Shore BlueClaws games at FirstEnergy Park, 2 Stadium Way. Fireworks nights include July 9 and 30 and Aug. 4, 6, 18 and 20. Admission included with game ticket. Go: 732-901-7000; blueclaws.com.

Lavallette: July 11, Centennial Gardens Gazebo, 8 to 9:30 p.m. A concert will be held prior to the fireworks, beginning at 7 p.m. Rain date is July 18. Go: 732-793-7477; lavallette.org.

Long Branch: Oceanfest 2021, Long Branch\'s annual Fourth of July party, is canceled this year. The fireworks, which were scheduled for July 4, are postponed until later this summer. Go: oceanfestnj.com.

Manasquan: Fireworks have been canceled because of the weather forecast. Go: manasquan-nj.gov.

Manchester: Aug. 25 at Harry Wright Lake in the Whiting section. Go: manchestertwp.com.

Matawan: July 2, located at Lake Lefferts, there will be a food vendor, free music, and free rides at 6:30 p.m. Fireworks will be from 9:15 to 10 p.m. Ravine Drive will close off for viewing. Rain date is July 9. Go: 732-566-3898; matawanborough.com.

Ocean Township (Monmouth County): There will be no fireworks this year.

Point Pleasant Beach: July 4, and every Thursday through September on Jenkinson’s beach. Go: 732-892-0600; jenkinsons.com.

Seaside Heights: July 4, and every Wednesday through Aug. 25; watch from the boardwalk, fireworks begin at 9:30. Go: exit82.com.

Union Beach: July 3 at the beachfront on Front Street. Fireworks begin at approximately 9 p.m. and there will be food vendors, novelty vendors and ice cream. There is limited parking in the municipal parking lots and no pets are allowed. Rain date is July 5. Go: ubnj.net.

Alex Biese, Bill Canacci, Chris Jordan and Lana Leonard contributed to this story.

Freehold Area Completion Rates For College Aid Applications

See how college aid applications changed for Freehold area high schools.FREEHOLD, NJ — Applications for federal college financial aid are notably lower this year, and that could mean fewer freshmen when classes begin this fall.Prospective college students can fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to qualify for subsidized student loans and other forms of aid. FAFSA applications declined 5.8 percent nationally this year compared with the same time last year. About 1.72 million students completed the appli...

See how college aid applications changed for Freehold area high schools.

FREEHOLD, NJ — Applications for federal college financial aid are notably lower this year, and that could mean fewer freshmen when classes begin this fall.

Prospective college students can fill out the Free Application for Federal Student Aid to qualify for subsidized student loans and other forms of aid. FAFSA applications declined 5.8 percent nationally this year compared with the same time last year. About 1.72 million students completed the application as of June 25, compared with 1.83 million in 2020, according to an Associated Press analysis of FAFSA data.

As of February this year, FAFSA applications were down 10 percent from last year. But the completion rate increased in the spring, when schools could hold more in-school FAFSA help events that were canceled last year because of the pandemic.

A decline in the FAFSA completion rate could be a harbinger of lower enrollment in the fall. The class of 2020 had 3.7 percent fewer FAFSA applications than the class of 2019; postsecondary enrollment dropped 6.8 percent between the class of 2020 and 2019, according to the National College Attainment Network.

In New Jersey, 55,028 FAFSA applications were completed as of June 25, compared with 57,281 completions at the same point last year. That is a 3.9 percent decrease. (See how Freehold area high schools compare below.)

The decline is steeper among Title 1 high schools, meaning those where low-income students make up at least 40 percent of enrollment. Title 1 high school completions dropped 8.83 percent, compared with a 3.86 decrease for non-Title 1 schools.

In New Jersey, completed applications dropped 8.7 percent from Title 1 schools, compared with a 2.8 percent drop for non-Title 1 school applications as of June 25.

Here is how schools in the Freehold area are doing with FAFSA completion as of June 25. See more Freehold area high schools here. Note: Percent changes can be affected by a relatively small difference in completions, especially for smaller schools. FAFSA data only counts students who are no older than 19.

School: Freehold Borough High School District: Freehold Regional High School District Municipality: Freehold

School: Biotechnology High School District: Monmouth County Vocational School District Municipality: Freehold

The FAFSA application for the 2020-21 academic year closes June 30 at 11:59 p.m. CT, according to the U.S. Department of Education. Many states and colleges set their own deadlines for aid applications. There has been a push in recent years to have students fill out the FAFSA earlier in their senior year.

Editor\'s note: This list was automatically generated using FAFSA data analyzed by the Associated Press. Federal high school counts don\'t include students over the age of 19. Information isn\'t available for all schools. Schools with fewer than five completions are omitted from the data. Please report any errors or other feedback to [email protected].

NJ Recommends $84K In Grants To Freehold Borough Schools

As part of a $500 million capital grants initiative, the governor\'s office has recommended funding to several Monmouth school districts. FREEHOLD BOROUGH, NJ - The Murphy Administration is recommending $317.2 million in awards that is on its way to the Legislature for final approval - and Freehold Borough Schools are slated to receive a chunk of the funding if passed.$84,470 has been recommended to the Legislature for allocation to Freehold Borough Schools under the first round of projects for the Securing Our Children\'s Fu...

As part of a $500 million capital grants initiative, the governor\'s office has recommended funding to several Monmouth school districts.

FREEHOLD BOROUGH, NJ - The Murphy Administration is recommending $317.2 million in awards that is on its way to the Legislature for final approval - and Freehold Borough Schools are slated to receive a chunk of the funding if passed.

$84,470 has been recommended to the Legislature for allocation to Freehold Borough Schools under the first round of projects for the Securing Our Children\'s Future Bond Act (SOCFBA), a $500 million statewide capital grants initiative approved by voters in November 2018, according to a spokesperson from the governor\'s press office.

The grants will fund school security, water infrastructure improvements, and enhancement of career and technical education (CTE) in county vocational-technical school districts and county colleges, according to a news release from Gov. Phil Murphy\'s office. Approximately $26 million has been allocated for county college CTE projects, $220.2 million for county vocational school district CTE project, $5.6 million for water infrastructure projects and $65.4 million for school security projects.

The funding for Freehold Borough Schools will go towards the installation of silent panic alarms to alert law enforcement during an emergency and for other school security upgrades including exterior lighting improvements, surveillance cameras, intercoms, remote locking/unlocking doors, shatter-resistant glass, signage improvements, generator installation and impact-rated vehicle barriers, according to the governor\'s office.

"I have long believed that investments in our students and schools are investments in the future of our state," Murphy said in a statement. "These projects will help our school districts and institutions of higher education keep students safe and healthy, while also ensuring that they are ready for the careers of the future."

"This is an investment in future opportunities for our children," said Senate President Steve Sweeney. "It will help provide them with job skills for the modern workforce, improve their safety and security in schoolrooms, and protect their health and well-being by ensuring clean water. It is an investment in their future and in the future of New Jersey, and I look forward to reviewing the proposed projects."

The first round of the SOCFBA will fund 494 proposed projects, totaling approximately $65.4 million. Murphy plans to announce a second round of grants at a later date.

For the list of round-one recommendations in this category, click here.

"Our children deserve the chance to learn in peace," said Assemblyman Ralph Caputo. "It has taken many years to get to this day. Alyssa\'s family and community have been steadfast champions of the legislation that has brought us here and I commend them for that. Coupled with security measures already in place, this project funding can increase the chances of diffusing a bad situation without further harm to students and staff. I\'m proud to see the project moving forward."

Here\'s how much each Monmouth County school district was recommended by the Murphy administration:

More hunger-focused bills likely to be approved with NJ budget

TRENTON – Among the many bills positioned for final votes as the Legislature completes its push to approve the budget and start its election-year recess are five addressing hunger-related issues, long a priority of Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin.The bills include two that address how SNAP food-assistance benefits are administered, two that seek to enhance summer and breakfast-after-the bell meals for students starting in a year and one establishing an Office of the Food Insecurity Advocate.Assemblywoman Lisa Swain, D-Ber...

TRENTON – Among the many bills positioned for final votes as the Legislature completes its push to approve the budget and start its election-year recess are five addressing hunger-related issues, long a priority of Assembly Speaker Craig Coughlin.

The bills include two that address how SNAP food-assistance benefits are administered, two that seek to enhance summer and breakfast-after-the bell meals for students starting in a year and one establishing an Office of the Food Insecurity Advocate.

Assemblywoman Lisa Swain, D-Bergen, said food insecurity is one of the many challenges imposed by the pandemic.

“It would be an understatement to say New Jersey residents have had a very difficult year and a half,” Swain said.

“The package of bills seeks to improve and enhance access to food assistance programs in our state so that families won’t have to worry about where their next meal with come from,” she said.

The bills appear likely to be approved this week, as part of the enactment of the new state budget, though they aren’t listed on the agenda for Monday’s voting sessions. A budget agreement is possible Monday, followed by Tuesday committee votes and final approval on Thursday.

A budget must be in place before the new fiscal year begins July 1.

The package of bills would increase state spending on hunger initiatives by around $5 million, most of it for a program encouraging schools to provide ‘breakfast after the bell’ programs by adding a 10-cent a meal state subsidy.

Assemblywoman Aura Dunn, R-Morris, said she was in the school breakfast program as a kid and knows its value – but also hears from school officials about how much milk and food gets left behind in the program currently.

“We know that there’s a lot of waste in this program, which the federal government needs to address. But I don’t want to be getting behind something that only adds to that,” Dunn said.

Dunn said the program is important but needs to be permissive, not mandatory, so schools can figure out the most suitable way to offer nourishment at the start of the day.

“And to suggest that we should be adding state resources to now offer even more food, I think we can be approaching this in a much more efficient manner and managing it better,” she said.

Assemblywoman Angelica Jimenez, D-Hudson, said depending on the part of the state, not all students are able to arrive for early morning meals before the bell.

“Kids don’t make it. I mean, they’re lucky if they make it on time to school. So, I think that is probably why this is being addressed,” Jimenez said.

There are five bills in the hunger package:

Michael Symons is State House bureau chief for New Jersey 101.5. Contact him at [email protected].

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.