BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Freehold borough

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Freehold borough, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Freehold Borough, NJ
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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Mold Remediation Companies Freehold Borough, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Freehold Borough, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Freehold Borough, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Freehold borough

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Freehold borough:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Freehold Borough, NJ

Latest News in Freehold borough, NJ

Little League: 2022 NJ State Tournament Guide, Schedule, Results

Two teams from North Jersey will join one team each from Central Jersey and South Jersey to compete in this year's Joe Graziano New Jersey Little League State Tournament in Pequannock.Seven of the last eight state champions have come out of Section 3 or more specifically have been teams from the Jersey Shore region of the state.Will that trend continue again in 2022? We'll find out very soon.After the New Jersey State Tournament, there are only two more stops to compete the Little League Baseball dream and...

Two teams from North Jersey will join one team each from Central Jersey and South Jersey to compete in this year's Joe Graziano New Jersey Little League State Tournament in Pequannock.

Seven of the last eight state champions have come out of Section 3 or more specifically have been teams from the Jersey Shore region of the state.

Will that trend continue again in 2022? We'll find out very soon.

After the New Jersey State Tournament, there are only two more stops to compete the Little League Baseball dream and that's a trip to Bristol, Connecticut, for the Mid-Atlantic tournament; and that winner finishes the season at the Little League World Series in Williamsport, Pennsylvania.

But for now, here is what you need to know for this year's New Jersey State Tournament.

Teams

New Jersey is divided into four sections for the annual little league baseball state tournament.

Section 1 covers the North and Northwest part of the state and will be represented by West Milford

Section 2 covers the Northeast part of the state and will be represented by Rutherford

Section 3 covers Central New Jersey and will be represented by Toms River East

More: The current Section 3 bracketView each game of this year's Section 3 Tournament

Section 4 covers the Southern part of the state and will be represented by Haddonfield

Stick with APP.com for more Little League baseball and softball updates this summer.

More: Subscribe for total accessHere is a better idea, get a digital subscription right now, so you get unlimited access all summer long.

How to get there

Pequannock Little League is the host and all games will be played at Washington Field. For GPS purposes, use 99 Washington Street, Pompton Plains, NJ 07444 as the field address.

From West Milford: Take Union Valley Road South until you meet the split at Macopin Road. Take a slight left turn onto Macopin Road South. Follow Macopin Road South and eventually turn right onto Echo Lake Road until you intersect with NJ-23 South. Follow NJ-23 South for 8.4 miles and turn slight right onto Newark Pompton Turnpike. Follow Newark Pompton Turnpike South for 1.6 miles and turn left onto Washington Street. Washington Street turns into Adams Street and the entrance to Washington Field is a short distance away.

From Rutherford: Take NJ Route 3 West and NJ-3 W eventually turns into US-46 W and take that for 1.8 miles and then take NJ-23 N for 2.0 miles. Take the Newark-Pompton Turnpike exit toward Pequannock and take that route for 2.7 miles. Turn right onto Washington Street and Washington Street turns into Adams Street and the entrance to Washington Field is a short distance away.

From Toms River: Take the Garden State Parkway North for 72.3 miles to NJ-3 W in Clifton. Take exit 153B from Garden State Parkway. Take NJ-3 W for 1.0 miles and NJ-3 W eventually turns into US-46 W and take that for 1.8 miles and then take NJ-23 N for 2.0 miles. Take the Newark-Pompton Turnpike exit toward Pequannock and take that route for 2.7 miles. Turn right onto Washington Street and Washington Street turns into Adams Street and the entrance to Washington Field is a short distance away.

From Haddonfield: Take the New Jersey Turnpike North to exit 11 Garden State Parkway North. Take the GSP North for 24.4 miles to NJ-3 W in Clifton. Take exit 153B from the Garden State Parkway. Take NJ-3 W for 1.0 miles and NJ-3 W eventually turns into US-46 W and take that for 1.8 miles and then take NJ-23 N for 2.0 miles. Take the Newark-Pompton Turnpike exit toward Pequannock and take that route for 2.7 miles. Turn right onto Washington Street and Washington Street turns into Adams Street and the entrance to Washington Field is a short distance away.

Schedule

Game 1: Haddonfield (Section 4) 14, West Milford 3 (In 6 innings)

Game 2: Toms River East (Section 3) 12, Rutherford (Section 2) 0 (In 4 innings)

More: A full recap of day 1 of tourneyThe NJ Little League state tournament began on July 27, find out how the 4 teams fared on the first day.

Loser's bracket elimination game

Game 3: Rutherford 13, West Milford 1 (In 4 innings)

Winner's bracket final

Game 4: Toms River East 10, Haddonfield 1

More: TRE cruises to next victoryThe 12–year-old All-Stars from Toms River East are very close to the state title

Loser's bracket final and elimination game

Game 5: Rutherford 7, Haddonfield 4

Championship game

Game 6: Toms River East 9, Rutherford 0

More: A state title for Toms River EastThe 12-year-old All Stars from TRE little league are state champions once again. Next stop Bristol , CT

Pitching Rules for Little League Baseball (Part A)

A manager must remove the pitcher when said pitcher reaches the limit for his/her age group (it is 85 pitches for the 12-year-olds).

But the pitcher may remain in the game at another position: Exception: If a pitcher reaches the limit imposed in Regulation VI (c) for his/her league age while facing a batter, the pitcher may continue to pitch until any one of the following conditions occurs: 1. That batter reaches base; 2. That batter is put out; 3. The third out is made to complete the half-inning. Note 1: A pitcher who delivers 41 or more pitches in a game cannot play the position of catcher for the remainder of that day.

Note 2: Any player who has played the position of catcher in four or more innings in a game is not eligible to pitch on that calendar day.

Pitching Rules for Little League Baseball (Part B)

If a player pitches 66 or more pitches in a day, four (4) calendar days of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 51-65 pitches in a day, three (3) calendar days of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 36-50 pitches in a day, two (2) calendar days of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 21-35 pitches in a day, one (1) calendar day of rest must be observed

If a player pitches 1-20 pitches in a day, no (0) calendar day of rest is required

Recent History

Here are the New Jersey Little League State Champions since 2000 in the 12-year-old division.

2021: Toms River East - Toms River East wins Little League state title

2020: Brick

2013: East Greenwich

2012: Par Troy East

2011: Paramus

2010: Toms River National

2009: Somerset Hills

2008: Bordentown

2007: Randolph East

2006: Livingston American

2005: Toms River American

2004: HTRBA

2003: Freehold Township American

2002: Nottingham

2001: Randolph West

2000: Pequannock

Sherlon Christie is a sports reporter at the Asbury Park Press and has covered sports at the Jersey Shore since 2004. Don't miss any of his coverage by subscribing at https://subscribe.app.com. You can contact him at https://linktr.ee/schristie2

Freehold Township’s bounceback victory sinks No. 15 Middletown South: baseball recap

Freehold Township head coach Todd Smith may end up with a few more gray hairs as this season progresses, but he has a team with and edge -- and he likes it.“We are an inexperienced team, we have one kid who had 70 at-bats last year and another with 20,” Smith said. “We have a brand new team.”Any brand new team is going to have good days and bad days.Monday was a good day -- a really good day -- for Freehold Township.With lefty-swinging sophomore Ryan Costello -- a Pitt recruit -- leading he...

Freehold Township head coach Todd Smith may end up with a few more gray hairs as this season progresses, but he has a team with and edge -- and he likes it.

“We are an inexperienced team, we have one kid who had 70 at-bats last year and another with 20,” Smith said. “We have a brand new team.”

Any brand new team is going to have good days and bad days.

Monday was a good day -- a really good day -- for Freehold Township.

With lefty-swinging sophomore Ryan Costello -- a Pitt recruit -- leading he way with two hits and three RBI, Freehold Township (2-1) collected 14 hits and drubbed No. 15 Middletown South, 11-2, in Freehold.

The upset victory came on the heels of a game against Middletown South last Friday when Freehold Township was no-hit by South’s All-State right-hander Ben Schild. Schild pitched a no-hitter and struck out 16 in a 6-0 victory.

“That game on Friday checked all the boxes and got a bunch of firsts out of the way,” Smith said, “First game of the season, first road game, first division game against a good team. “Schild was just better than we were. He is even better than he was last year. He’s significantly improved.”

But, there’s a but.

“We competed,” Smith said. “We didn’t concede anything. We showed mental toughness and I liked that.”

Freehold Township responded with a 9-2 win over rival Freehold Borough on Saturday. Then, in the rematch against Middletown South, Freehold Township looked like, and played like, a different team.”

When asked which is the real Middletown South, Smith said: “We’re both. We’re a team that is capable of plating well, but we’re also a team capable of losing because of inexperience.”

Middletown South (1-1) jumped all over Freehold Township starter CJ Svoboda. The Eagles got an RBI single from slugging first baseman Joe Stanzione, but nothing else against Svoboda, who struck out one, walked four, allowed one hit and one earned run in 4.2 innings.

“He threw 65 pitches and I had to pull him when he walked two guys with two outs in the fifth,” Smith said. “I think it was a case of the jitters in the first and he was tired in the fifth. He pitched to contact and we did a good job of playing defense behind him.”

Unlike last Friday when it could muster no offense against Schild, Freehold Township struck back with three runs in the third against a veteran starter in Evan Wood. Giacomo Calamita smacked an RBI double, Sean Keegan had an RBI ground out and Ryan Kopf had a run-scoring single for a 3-2 lead.

Freehold Township added two runs in the fourth on a single by Keegan and a fielder’s choice by Costello. During a back-breaking, five-run binge in fifth, Anthony Sirico had a two-run single and Costello a two-run double.

“In all three games, we’ve gotten better as the game went on,” Smith said. “I feel like that is a good sign.”

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Once-Segregated School Building Returned To Freehold Borough Ownership

In a title transfer from Monmouth County, Freehold can take over maintenance of the Court Street School building, now a community center. FREEHOLD, NJ – The Court Street School building in the borough has a storied past. It was once a segregated school, then a World War II air raid shelter, then an integrated borough school, and finally the beloved home of a community outreach center.And now, in the latest fine point of its history, it is officially owned by the borough that has played such a central part in the lives o...

In a title transfer from Monmouth County, Freehold can take over maintenance of the Court Street School building, now a community center.

FREEHOLD, NJ – The Court Street School building in the borough has a storied past. It was once a segregated school, then a World War II air raid shelter, then an integrated borough school, and finally the beloved home of a community outreach center.

And now, in the latest fine point of its history, it is officially owned by the borough that has played such a central part in the lives of its students for more than 100 years.

Ownership of the school building was transferred from Monmouth County by the Board of County Commissioners to Freehold Borough at an Aug. 11 commissioner's meeting .

Once a segregated primary school, the brick building on a low hill, which now serves as a center for education and community outreach, towers in historical significance for the area.

The commissioners marked the title transfer by presenting Freehold Mayor Kevin A. Kane, Court Street School Foundation Board members and its President Emeritus Lillie Ham Hendry with a ceremonial key to the Court Street School.

The school building has operated for many years as the home to the Court Street School Education Community Center. But since its founding in 1915 as a segregated school in the borough, it has seen many transformations.

“The Court Street School was a source of great pride to the students who went there, and it was through the efforts of its devoted alumni, especially Miss Lillie Hendry, that it was so lovingly preserved," said Freehold Mayor Kevin A. Kane.

“It was built for all the wrong reasons, a segregated school meant to keep people apart, but restored now, and in its second life, it makes up for that by serving for all the right reasons - to bring people together as a community,” Kane said.

“We expect that the Court Street School and the good work being done by the Education Community Center members will continue to serve as our ‘never again’ reminder as we seek together, to build a more just and equitable society,” said Kane.

Kane said the history of how the county acquired the title to the school is still unclear. But it is back now with the borough for "a nominal fee," Kane said.

Kane said this means the town can take over the care of the building and grounds so the board of the center can focus on its programs, such as summer camps and other educational and community outreach, and, of course, on continuing to preserve the history and legacy of the school.

Kane said the borough fully supports the Court Street School Education Community Center and itsmission to serve the community.

"We look forward to collaborating with the board and other community groups and leaders to realize the full potential of this historic and valuable community asset," Kane said.

Here is some of the history of the school from the website of the Court Street School Education Community Center:

"The Court Street School is one of the principal structures associated with the segregated history of early 20th-century education for African Americans in Freehold," the site says. It remains one of just a handful of segregated school buildings still standing in the Northeast.

The original school was "organized in 1915 exclusively for the education of African American children by the Freehold Board of Education." It was a one-room wooden building located just west of the present site.

"The existing school was constructed in two phases, in 1920 and 1926. All African-American children in Freehold were educated at Court Street School from kindergarten through eighth grade until World War II, when the school was used as an air raid shelter and a ration station.

"Under pressure from war veterans, a court order integrated the school and it reopened for kindergarten through third grade in 1949," the website recounts.

The school was closed in 1974. In 1990, the Court Street School Education Community Center, Inc. was formed as a nonprofit, tax-exempt organization, to restore the school for use as an Education Community Center and to preserve it as an African-American historic landmark.

The group received a $344,698 matching grant in 1993 from the New Jersey Historic Trust and the Monmouth County Board of Freeholders to restore the facility. In 1995, the building became an official historic site in the state of New Jersey, and was placed on the National Register of Historic Sites.

The New Jersey Historic Preservation Bond Program described the school building this way: "The Colonial Revival style brick schoolhouse was designed by locally prominent architect Warren H. Conover. The Court Street School is associated with the history of early 20th-century education in Freehold, and has long been a major focal point of its African-American community."

The site "has incredible historical significance and the Board of Commissioners is honored to transfer ownership to Freehold Borough at no cost,” said Commissioner Director Thomas A. Arnone, referring to action at the Aug. 11 commissioners' meeting.

“We look forward to seeing the Court Street School grow through their educational programming, community awareness campaigns, and youth engagement to connect with the community in positive ways,” he added.

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Freehold's historic Court Street School returns home

FREEHOLD BOROUGH – Court Street School is back in local hands.Ownership of the once all-black elementary school that dates back to 1915 was formally transferred from Monmouth County to Freehold Borough, and at no cost.The Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously on Aug. 11 to return the historic site back to the borough, which plans to continue using it as an educational community center.“The Court Street School Community Education Foundation will continue to operate the ...

FREEHOLD BOROUGH – Court Street School is back in local hands.

Ownership of the once all-black elementary school that dates back to 1915 was formally transferred from Monmouth County to Freehold Borough, and at no cost.

The Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners voted unanimously on Aug. 11 to return the historic site back to the borough, which plans to continue using it as an educational community center.

“The Court Street School Community Education Foundation will continue to operate the facility as before, but now the borough will be able to take care of the routine maintenance associated with the building and grounds,” Mayor Kevin Kane said via email. “This allows the foundation to concentrate on community and educational programs needed to preserve the history and legacy of the school, instead of worrying about the costs involved in maintaining the facility."

He called it an “historic and valuable community asset.”

For subscribers:Four Ocean County law enforcement agencies did not follow bodycam law for more than a year

Borough Administrator Stephen Gallo said the new maintenance costs will be “minimal,” but offered no specific estimates.

“We do not expect the acquisition to have a significant financial impact,” Gallo said via email. “We need to transfer utility bills and insurance to the borough’s accounts. We had an engineer inspect the facility and found it to be in very good shape. (The Department of Public Works) will integrate any maintenance needs into our current staff. The cost to light and heat the premises will be minimal.”

Monmouth County commissioners marked the occasion by presenting Kane, Court Street School Foundation board members and their president emeritus, Lillie Ham Hendry, with a ceremonial key to the building.

“The Court Street School Education Community Center has incredible historical significance and was declared an official historical site in 1995 and the Board of Commissioners is honored to transfer ownership to Freehold Borough at no cost,” said Commissioner Director Thomas A. Arnone. “We look forward to seeing the Court Street School grow through their educational programming, community awareness campaigns, and youth engagement to connect with the community in positive ways.”

Dubbed the “university on the hill,” the historic site was where Black children from Freehold and surrounding areas were taught through eighth grade between 1915 and 1948.

"Even though it was segregated, you were proud to go there," Norma Lewis Randolph, 81, one of the last students to graduate from the school before it integrated, said in 2015. "You were deprived of all sorts of things, but you were so educated."

Textbooks were handed down from neighboring white-only schools, some with students’ names still scribbled inside. Multiple grades shared a classroom; teachers taught music in the hallways. And, during recess, the older girls taught the younger ones how to cornrow their hair and decorate it with twigs and acorns.

The red-bricked schoolhouse between Court Street and Avenue A has remained open for after-school programs, summer camp and other community services, but hasn't served as a school since 1974.

In the early history of the school, Black residents were not allowed to attend white schools, live in certain neighborhoods or own businesses. Movie theaters, fairs and beaches, too, remained segregated.

Court Street School first opened in 1913, down the hill from its current location. It was a small, one-story wooden building on Avenue A and served Black students in grades one through eight. The Freehold Borough Board of Education formalized the school in 1915 as it continued educating children of Black migrants.

The student population soon outgrew the original building. In 1919, the department of education built the current structure, just up the hill from the old building. Kindergarten was also added to the school.

The Great Migration, the relocation of Blacks from the rural South to take advantage of burgeoning industrial jobs in the North, only boosted enrollment, historians said. Long-standing Black families in the area combined with new waves of African Americans, heightened the need for Court Street School.

At the time, there were as many as 12 segregated elementary and middle schools for Black children in Monmouth County, but Court Street School was the only one in the western part of the county.

The two-classroom school then grew to four classrooms, with two or three grades to a room.

During World War II, the school was used as an air raid shelter and ration station. It integrated in the early 1950s, serving Black and white students through the third grade.

Veterans from World War II were coming home and pushing for better and more integrated communities, historians said.

Court Street School was closed in the 1970s. It was no longer needed after new schools were built in the area. It was used as a probation office by the courts and then remained unused until a group of alumni advocated preserving the school.

The building was named an historical site in 1995. By then, the Court Street School Education Center Inc. was formed to offer community programs in the school. The nonprofit received more than $800,000 from the New Jersey Historic Trust and the Monmouth County Board of Freeholders to restore the facility.

Joe Strupp is an award-winning journalist with 30 years’ experience who covers education and several local communities for APP.com and the Asbury Park Press. He is also the author of three books, including Killing Journalism on the state of the news media, and an adjunct media professor at Rutgers University and Fairleigh Dickinson University. Reach him at [email protected] and at 732-413-3840. Follow him on Twitter at @joestrupp

UPDATED 2022 girls soccer NJSIAA sectional, group classifications

The NJSIAA released an up-to-date list of the girls soccer sectional classifications and the latest update has some teams on the move, including a few title teams. Scroll through to get a full look at this year’s alignments and see where your team will play this fall.2022 SECTIONAL CLASSIFIUCATIONSNORTH 1, GROUP 1BoontonButlerCresskillEmerson BoroGlen RockHawthorneHopatcongKinnelonKittatinnyLenape ValleyMidland Park...

The NJSIAA released an up-to-date list of the girls soccer sectional classifications and the latest update has some teams on the move, including a few title teams. Scroll through to get a full look at this year’s alignments and see where your team will play this fall.

2022 SECTIONAL CLASSIFIUCATIONS

NORTH 1, GROUP 1

Boonton

Butler

Cresskill

Emerson Boro

Glen Rock

Hawthorne

Hopatcong

Kinnelon

Kittatinny

Lenape Valley

Midland Park

New Milford

North Warren

Park Ridge

Paterson Charter

Pequannock

Pompton Lakes

Saddle Brook

Waldwick

Wallkill Valley

NORTH 1, GROUP 2

Demarest

Dumont

Dwight-Morrow

Elmwood Park

High Point

Indian Hills

Jefferson

Lakeland

Mahwah

Manchester Regional

Newton

Old Tappan

Pascack Hills

Pascack Valley

Ramsey

River Dell

Sussex Tech

Vernon

West Milford

Westwood

NORTH 1, GROUP 3

Becton

Bergenfield

Dover

Fort Lee

Garfield

Leonia

Montville

Morris Hills

Morris Knolls

Mount Olive

Northern Highlands

Paramus

Ramapo

Randolph

Roxbury

Sparta

Teaneck

Tenafly

Wayne Hills

Wayne Valley

NORTH 1, GROUP 4

Bergen Tech

Bloomfield

Clifton

Columbia

East Orange

Fair Lawn

Hackensack

Kearny

Livingston

Memorial

Montclair

Morristown

North Bergen

Passaic

Passaic Tech

Paterson Eastside

Paterson Kennedy

Ridgewood

Union City

West Orange

NORTH 2, GROUP 1

Belvidere

Brearley

Cedar Grove

Dayton

Glen Ridge

Hasbrouck Heights

Hoboken

McNair

Mountain Lakes

New Providence

Newark Tech

North Arlington

Ridgefield

Secaucus

Technology

Verona

Warren Tech

Weehawken

Whippany Park

Wood-Ridge

NORTH 2, GROUP 2

Bernards

Caldwell

Hackettstown

Hanover Park

Harrison

Lodi

Lyndhurst

Madison

Morris Tech

Newark Central

Newark Collegiate

Parsippany

Parsippany Hills

Passaic Valley

Ridgefield Park

Rutherford

Science Park

Voorhees

West Essex

West Morris

NORTH 2, GROUP 3

Belleville

Chatham

Cliffside Park

Colonia

Cranford

Ferris

Iselin Kennedy

Mendham

Millburn

North Hunterdon

North Plainfield

Nutley

Orange

Payne Tech

Rahway

Scotch Plains-Fanwood

Somerville

South Plainfield

Summit

Warren Hills

NORTH 2, GROUP 4

Bayonne

Bridgewater-Raritan

Dickinson

Edison

Elizabeth

Franklin

Hunterdon Central

Irvington

J.P. Stevens

Linden

Newark East Side

Perth Amboy

Phillipsburg

Piscataway

Plainfield

Ridge

Union

Watchung Hills

Westfield

Woodbridge

CENTRAL, GROUP 1

Asbury Park

Burlington City

Central Jersey College Prep

College Achieve Central Charter

Dunellen

Florence

Foundation Academy Charter

Highland Park

Keyport

Manville

Middlesex

New Egypt

Point Pleasant Beach

Riverside

Roselle Park

Shore

Somerset Tech

South Amboy

South Hunterdon

STEMCivics

CENTRAL, GROUP 2

Bordentown

Bound Brook

Carteret

Delaware Valley

Gov. Livingston

Hillside

Holmdel

Johnson

Manasquan

Metuchen

Monmouth

Nottingham

Ocean Township

Point Pleasant Boro

Raritan

Robbinsville

Rumson-Fair Haven

South River

Spotswood

Wall

CENTRAL, GROUP 3

Allentown

Brick Memorial

Brick Township

Burlington Township

Colts Neck

Ewing

Freehold Boro

Hamilton West

Hopewell Valley

Jackson Liberty

Jackson Memorial

Lawrence

Matawan

Middletown North

Middletown South

Neptune

Northern Burlington

Red Bank Regional

Steinert

West Windsor-Plainsboro North

CENTRAL, GROUP 4

East Brunswick

Freehold Township

Hightstown

Hillsborough

Howell

Lakewood

Long Branch

Manalapan

Marlboro

Monroe

Montgomery

New Brunswick

North Brunswick

Old Bridge

Princeton

Rancocas Valley

Sayreville

South Brunswick

Trenton

West Windsor-Plainsboro South

SOUTH, GROUP 1

Audubon

Buena

Cape May Tech

Clayton

Gateway

Glassboro

Gloucester

Haddon Township

KIPP: Cooper Norcross Academy

Maple Shade

Palmyra

Paulsboro

Penns Grove

Pennsville

Pitman

Salem

Schalick

Wildwood

Woodbury

Woodstown

SOUTH, GROUP 2

Barnegat

Cedar Creek

Cinnaminson

Collingswood

Delran

Haddon Heights

Haddonfield

Lindenwold

Lower Cape May

Manchester Township

Medford Tech

Middle Township

Oakcrest

Overbrook

Pennsauken Tech

Pleasantville

Seneca

Sterling

West Deptford

Willingboro

SOUTH, GROUP 3

Absegami

Cherry Hill West

Clearview

Cumberland

Delsea

Deptford

Hammonton

Highland

Lacey

Mainland

Moorestown

Ocean City

Pemberton

Pinelands

Shawnee

Timber Creek

Toms River South

Triton

Westampton Tech

Winslow

SOUTH, GROUP 4

Atlantic City

Atlantic Tech

Bridgeton

Camden Tech

Central Regional

Cherokee

Cherry Hill East

Eastern

Egg Harbor

Gloucester Tech

Kingsway

Lenape

Millville

Pennsauken

Southern

Toms River East

Toms River North

Vineland

Washington Township

Williamstown

NORTH, NON-PUBLIC A

Dwight-Englewood

Holy Angels

Hudson Catholic

Immaculate Heart

Kent Place

Montclair Kimberley

Morristown-Beard

Mount St. Dominic

Newark Academy

Oak Knoll

Paramus Catholic

Pingry

Pope John

SOUTH, NON-PUBLIC A

Camden Catholic

Donovan Catholic

Immaculata

Mount St. Mary

Notre Dame

Our Lady of Mercy

Paul VI

Princeton Day

Red Bank Catholic

St. John Vianney

St. Thomas Aquinas

Trinity Hall

Union Catholic

NORTH, NON-PUBLIC B

DePaul

Eastern Christian

Gill St. Bernard’s

Golda Och

Hawthorne Christian

Lodi Immaculate

Mary Help of Christians

Morris Catholic

Mother Seton

Roselle Catholic

Saddle River Day

St. Dominic

St. Elizabeth

Villa Walsh

SOUTH, NON-PUBLIC B

Bishop Eustace

Calvary Christian (Old Bridge)

Doane Academy

Gloucester Catholic

Holy Cross Prep

Holy Spirit

Moorestown Friends

Ranney

Rutgers Prep

St. Joseph (Hamm.)

St. Rose

Wardlaw-Hartridge

Wildwood Catholic

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