BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Farmdale

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Farmdale, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Waterproof Basement Farmdale, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Farmdale

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Farmdale:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

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Now On Course: A Lifelong Dream Becomes a Reality

My mother and father moved to Woodside in 1958 when I was 3 years old. Unfortunately for them, since they were not horse people, Woodside was horse country, and my sister and I soon became horse crazy. We saw them all the time in town, at local riding stables, even bars! Eventually, we began taking riding lessons. In 1963, my mom found a home on 4.75 acres in town with a barn and the die was cast.Sadly, my mom passed away before we moved but knowing our fantasy and our pain, my dad got a horse for me and my sister. We attended Pony Cl...

My mother and father moved to Woodside in 1958 when I was 3 years old. Unfortunately for them, since they were not horse people, Woodside was horse country, and my sister and I soon became horse crazy. We saw them all the time in town, at local riding stables, even bars! Eventually, we began taking riding lessons. In 1963, my mom found a home on 4.75 acres in town with a barn and the die was cast.

Sadly, my mom passed away before we moved but knowing our fantasy and our pain, my dad got a horse for me and my sister. We attended Pony Club when we could, but since we were not a horse family we had no trailer and could only show once a year at the local Mounted Patrol show grounds. We mostly rode trails and played at the Playpen, which was a mini CETA (as the Horse Park at Woodside was once called) in the middle of town with two arenas, a galloping track, and cross-country jumps. It was so much fun. All the local kids that had horses rode there. The Los Altos Hounds were kept there as well and we both were invited as kids to hilltop on Stanford land with the hunt. Then came high school and college and the horses found new homes.

It was years before I returned to riding. When I was in my late 40s, I was given an adorable little chestnut Arabian named Copper Style. We were riding on a trail in Woodside shortly after I got Style when a pit bull broke his chain, jumped out of the bed of a moving pickup truck, and ran 30 feet down the trail to attack my horse. When the dog leaped at Style's neck, Style would rear and when he came down I was able to hit the dog with my dressage whip, but it was like hitting a fence post. There was no reaction. Style even kicked the dog, who flew at least 20 feet, but he came back angrier.

Finally, a neighbor's dog came to see what was going on and the pit bull went after him. But, before I could settle Style and get off, he was back. At that point, I made a mistake. Out of pure anguish, I tilted my head back, pleading to the owner (and perhaps heaven) for this to stop. Just then, Style kicked at the dog and my neck snapped back, breaking the second cervical bone in half. As the Stanford neurosurgeon described it, it was a hangman's fracture "because that's the bone they break and the way they break it when they hang you. You are not meant to survive." As I came out of the saddle, I also tore two ligaments in my left knee I landed head and elbow first on the pavement. Thankfully I was wearing a helmet because Style stepped on my head in his panic to get away from the dog. My recovery was several years long but I did put this in the column of dog accident, not riding accident. I was not going to let this accident deter me from doing what I enjoyed.

After the accident, we were out riding at the Horse Park at Woodside and I witnessed my first horse trials. I realized that this sport was something I wanted to try. When I did more research and learned about the USEA Classic Series Training Three-Day, I thought that looked particularly exciting. At the time, the Novice Three-Day did not exist, and it was a huge leap in my mind from Beginner Novice (there was no Intro level at that time) to a Training Three-Day. I was still recovering from the pit bull’s attack and needed knee surgery. Still, a dream crystallized of one day competing in a Training Three-Day.

Sadly, as much as I loved my athletic little 14.2-hand Arabian, he was not brave enough for this sport. Then, with the sudden passing of my brother-in-law in 2008, I was reminded how short life can be. So, I purchased my first event horse, a 15.2-hand Irish Sport Horse called Slew of Diamonds. Together, over the course of the next five years, Slew and I progressed from the Beginner Novice level all the way to the Training level. We even completed the Novice Three-Days together at Twin Rivers and Rebecca Farm in 2013.

In 2014, Slew and I were just one qualification away from the Training Three-Day when I received devastating news on so many fronts; my father was terminally ill, Slew's mysterious lameness was due to navicular disease, and my previous trainer was leaving the area. I had some major decisions to make. I felt I'd lost my moorings, but the only thing I was sure of was that I loved eventing and horses, and I wanted to stick with it.

I remembered Andrea Pfeiffer of Chocolate Horse Farm coming to my aid so many years ago at Galway Down when my trainer had to leave me during cross-country warmup in the capable, but very shy, hands of his working student. She didn’t seem comfortable entering the arena and I could not hear her. I needed help. Though Andrea was warming up her own student, she stepped up to help me during that warm-up. I never forgot that act of kindness, so it was a no-brainer to choose Chocolate Horse Farm and Andrea Pfeiffer to help me grow in this wonderful sport with this amazing community.

I really loved Slew, so when he became lame due to navicular changes I knew I first wanted to bring him back to soundness and find a perfect situation for him. After he was provided for, Andrea suggested I look on Sporthorse Nation for a new eventing partner. I wanted a horse that had successfully completed a few Preliminaries, mainly so I would be comfortable with him or her at the Training level.

I found Shannondale Fionn aka “Dale,” a young Irish Sport Horse, listed there and saw that he was in Kennett Square, Pennsylvania, not far from Fair Hill where Andrea would be coaching for the Fair Hill International. She agreed to take a look at him on the Monday after the show if I rode him and liked him first, so I booked my ticket and met Daniel Clasing and Dale in October 2016.

Though it's so hard to tell from a few test rides, Dale has been a terrific partner for me. Only 5 coming 6 when I bought him, he was very confident and I learned to trust him implicitly. Our only errors on cross-country have been mine because he can be strong and I occasionally have trouble turning him. Dale never says no to a jump and has a terrific gallop. I think the photo that Leslie Mintz took of us galloping on steeplechase in the Novice Three-Day at Rebecca Farm says it all (the featured photo). Friends were walking their course and yelled, "Go Jeanne!" You can tell from my smile that I am loving it.

Now it seemed I had the right partner to get me to the Training Three-Day, but I had some more challenges to overcome.

Back in 2008, at one of my very first jumping lessons with Slew, I was unused to his back-cracking jump and got jumped out of the tack, dislocating one of my vertebrae at L4/5. It was tolerable for many years but eventually became serious. A year after I bought Dale, my issue because intolerable. So, I had surgery in November of 2017. Thankfully it was the end of the season – good planning on my part – and I was ready to resume competing in 2018. But in the middle of that year, not too long after the Novice Three-Day at Rebecca Farm, Dale's splint became active and I couldn’t risk him getting injured. I canceled my entry in the USEA American Eventing Championships and my next event was a year later, at Rebecca Farm in 2019.

While Dale was off due to his splint and I was anxious to continue riding, I purchased a very nice horse who had more miles and training than Dale. We were trotting a cross-rail when he hit the rails with his front feet and I was literally a lawn dart. Landing on my hip, I fractured my sacrum – just a tiny break – but I couldn't take a pain-free step, so there was another delay. When you're young, some months off doesn't amount to much, but at 64 I felt my eventing time clock ticking.

Now, in my 66th year, in spite of losing precious time due to back surgery in 2017, then sitting out almost a year of competition due to Dale’s splint in 2018, after missing another several months recovering from a fractured pelvis in 2019, and having an abridged pandemic competition calendar with nerve-racking California fires in 2020, I can actually imagine my dream could be realized this year. Last year, Dale and I successfully moved up to Training and are now qualified for the Training Three-Day!

I know the stars will still have to align, that Dale and I have to remain healthy and strong (hence my commitment to Pilates six times a week!), that I have to do my best to be brave, and that Rebecca Farms has to be able to remain on the calendar. But I would not be able to see myself tackling this challenge if it weren’t for the terrific coaching from Andrea, the cheers from my barnmates and friends in eventing, and the commitment of the USEA to this sport.

I know I still have miles to go, but I feel like this might be the year I finally reach my lifetime riding goal! Thank you to Andrea Pfeiffer and the team at Chocolate Horse Farm, Daniel Clasing for my lovely partner, Shannondale Fionn, and the USEA and show organizers for persevering during the pandemic. I do hope I’m able to compete in the Training Three-Day at Rebecca Farm this July, but whatever happens this year, the journey has been terrific!

The USEA is made up of over 12,000 members, each with their own special horses and experiences. The USEA's Now on Course series highlights the many unique stories of our membership. Do you and your horse have a tale to tell? Do you know someone who deserves recognition? Submit your story to Leslie Mintz at [email protected] to be featured.

Exclusive: How Safe Are LA’s Schools? Interactive Map Compares What Teachers & Students Are Reporting

As states rethink school accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act, policymakers often overlook information that goes to the heart of what might be the most fundamental question for any parent: Does my child feel safe?Data about the real inner workings of schools, from teacher morale to academic culture to student safety, are rarely rated, and almost never reported.Los Angeles, however, conducts comprehensive school climate surveys of teachers and students and — unlike almost every other major district — m...

As states rethink school accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act, policymakers often overlook information that goes to the heart of what might be the most fundamental question for any parent: Does my child feel safe?

Data about the real inner workings of schools, from teacher morale to academic culture to student safety, are rarely rated, and almost never reported.

Los Angeles, however, conducts comprehensive school climate surveys of teachers and students and — unlike almost every other major district — makes the full data set available to the public.

I’ve taken a slice of the data — questions pertaining to school order and safety — and placed it on a Google map so parents can quickly and easily see what students and teachers at their schools are saying. The data reflects responses from 786 district and charter schools across the city that participated in surveys given in the 2015–16 school year, the most recent available. (The district reports having “over 900” traditional public schools as well as 187 charters.)

Here are the city’s elementary and secondary schools, color-coded to reflect the responses to survey questions about school safety; you can scan and zoom below, or click here for a full-screen version that you can search by address or specific school name.

Again, to take stock of the individual survey results, click on the green, yellow. or red pin and see the pop-up window. (Click here for a full breakdown of the methodology behind the map.)

Elementary schools were coded as green/safe where less than 10 percent of students did not report feeling safe most or all of the time; schools where 10 percent to 20 percent of students did not report feeling safe were coded as yellow/somewhat safe; schools where more than 20 percent of students did not report feeling safe were coded as red/less safe.

Secondary schools where less than 25 percent of students did not report feeling safe were coded as green/safe; schools where 25 percent to 40 percent of students did not report feeling safe were coded as yellow/somewhat safe; schools where 40 percent or more of students did not report feeling safe were coded as red/less safe.

For some schools, Los Angeles reports data across several grade spans; in those cases, I averaged each observation.

At Coliseum Elementary, 45 percent of students say they do not feel safe at school and 81 percent say bullying is a significant problem.

Teachers seem to agree that things are not going smoothly — 64 percent say their discipline practices are not effective, and 52 percent say disruptive behavior is a significant problem.

Fewer teachers at Edwin Markham Middle School believe that their discipline practices are effective than just about any other school in LAUSD: A whopping 92 percent say the way they try to handle misbehavior isn’t working. Ninety-two percent of staff also say student disrespect of teachers is a significant problem (70 percent of students admit that).

Students and teachers are also on the same page regarding bullying: 77 percent of teachers and 82 percent of students say it’s a problem. Two-thirds of students at Edwin Markham say they don’t feel safe, and given everything else, it’s unfortunately easy to imagine why.

In general, the differences between neighboring schools in Los Angeles are less striking than in New York City. This may be due in part to policy, or the fact that while a significant majority of charter schools in NYC participate in the climate survey, only a sliver of LA charters do so. It’s entirely possible that charters are offering a safer option for students in LA than in NYC — but unfortunately, there’s no way for parents to know whether that’s true.

City Terrace Elementary School is, according to students and teachers, the safest and most orderly elementary school in East Los Angeles. Only 7 percent of students at City Terrace say they don’t feel safe at school, compared with 22 percent at Robert F. Kennedy Elementary School, 22 percent at Harrison Street Elementary, and 17 percent at William R. Anton Elementary School.

Some of the most disorderly and dangerous schools in Los Angeles can be found, as sadly may not be a surprise, in Watts. When you hover over the neighborhood, however, there does appear to be one bright spot: Thomas Riley High School. It’s the safest in Watts — and it specializes in serving teenage mothers.

Max Eden is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, specializing in education policy. See a similar breakdown of schools in New York City, and click here to read Max Eden’s analysis of lessons he learned from compiling and mapping these data.

Get the latest news about school climate and school safety, as well as access to new interactive tools that better help parents understand their neighborhood and school district, by signing up for The 74 Newsletter.

Slam Dunk for Planned Moorestown Indoor Sports Complex

The proposed indoor sports facility would feature a turf field and batting cages. The project cleared a Planning Board step Tuesday.A proposed 52,000-square-foot indoor sports complex cleared a big hurdle Tuesday as Moorestown's Planning Board gave its OK for plans to move forward.The complex hasn't crossed the finish line, but it rounded a corner on a series of approvals needed to begin the four-building project off of Flynn, Redmond and Glen avenues. The project, dubbed the Field House, still needs final Planning Board appr...

The proposed indoor sports facility would feature a turf field and batting cages. The project cleared a Planning Board step Tuesday.

A proposed 52,000-square-foot indoor sports complex cleared a big hurdle Tuesday as Moorestown's Planning Board gave its OK for plans to move forward.

The complex hasn't crossed the finish line, but it rounded a corner on a series of approvals needed to begin the four-building project off of Flynn, Redmond and Glen avenues. The project, dubbed the Field House, still needs final Planning Board approval, construction plan approval and another presentation before the Appearance Committee, among other steps.

Kevin Loftus, a 15-year Moorestown resident and managing member for the proposed Field House, was all smiles after the three-hour Planning Board meeting, calling it a big step in process. Moorestown needs an indoor sports complex, he said, for kids and adults alike to play close to home.

"I've coached in town, my kids play a lot of sports, I'm friends with parents in town, and we all complain about having to drive to Mount Laurel or Cherry Hill," Loftus said. "There's a need. It's going to be opportunity for people to stay in town."

As plans stand, the complex would feature four buildings on what is now a vacant, overgrown lot last occupied by Moorestown Gardens a decade ago. Two existing buildings would be retrofitted, with one partially demolished, and two buildings would go up on the site.

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Features would include an indoor turf field, batting cages, strength and agility training areas and some exercise equipment.

With plans on a roll, the Field House could progress quickly.

"Our goal is to be open for the winter training season," Loftus said. "We've identified that as starting Oct. 1.

"Whether that's too aggressive, because we have a fair amount of work to do on the facility, we'd still like to have buildings one and two—the administrative building and training field—open for use in advance of the winter training season, with the expectation that building three, the large facility, would be built sometime next year and be ready for the 2014 training season."

Traffic, parking and noise questioned

The site is situated now to open to Flynn Avenue, but plans call for Flynn and Redmond avenues to be blocked off with landscaping and berms and the entrance to be relocated through Glen Avenue, which feeds in off of New Albany Road. That change would happen when construction begins, and the Field House would have a Glen Avenue address.

Nearby residents from Farmdale Road asked several questions about the Field House project during the Planning Board hearing, but didn't outright object to any of the plans.

Residents were mainly concerned with traffic, stormwater management and potential noise from the site. In a nod to residents' concerns, Loftus and partners agreed to ensure all lights but security ones are out no later than an hour after the last game.

Loftus anticipates the Field House could open from 6 or 7 am. to midnight, as sports leagues take advantage of pre-work and late night games. But, he stressed, all groups must schedule their time and walk-ins won't be accepted.

Unlike other similar indoor complexes in South Jersey, the Field House won't double as an entertainment spot for loud music or have playground equipment, Loftus promised.

"The loudest things I expect to hear are whistles and cheers," he said.

Tuesday's meeting also had some back and forth over planned parking. A project of this size calls for nearly 300 parking spaces, but the plan asks for a variance for 103 instead. The project's professionals noted it was a conservative estimate based on maximum usage at the Field House. Parking, which is in the back of the building, could be expanded if necessary. The lot ends near several acres of unused space on the 8.4-acre property.

The Field House has the unanimous support of Moorestown's Economic Advisory Committee, that group's chairman Jake Der Hagopian said.

"I'm very encouraged to see this type of use," he said. "It's going to contribute to our local businesses when people leave the facility and go shop or eat on Main Street."

Seth Broder, an attorney representing the project applicants, called the Field House a win for Moorestown.

"The property has been abandoned, neglected and is something that is, frankly, quite an eyesore," he said. The project "will take an eyesore and transform it into a top-notch facility that will benefit the town immensely with no foreseeable detriment."

You tell us: What do you think of the Field House plans?

Exclusive: How Safe Is My Child at School? New Interactive Maps Allow NYC & LA Parents to Compare Classrooms

What do parents actually know about what happens at their children’s school?As states rethink school accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act, most of the policy discussion revolves around how bureaucrats should calculate ratings that parents rarely see, based on standardized test scores that parents barely credit. The real inner workings of schools, from teacher morale to academic culture to student safety, remain largely a black box for parents.Few schools rate these important factors, and fewer still report ...

What do parents actually know about what happens at their children’s school?

As states rethink school accountability under the Every Student Succeeds Act, most of the policy discussion revolves around how bureaucrats should calculate ratings that parents rarely see, based on standardized test scores that parents barely credit. The real inner workings of schools, from teacher morale to academic culture to student safety, remain largely a black box for parents.

Few schools rate these important factors, and fewer still report them.

A recent poll of first-generation college students found that 1 in 4 did not feel safe in high school, and nearly 1 in 3 did not feel their high school was an emotionally safe or inclusive place. How many of their parents were aware that their children felt they were in danger at school?

What if there were a safe alternative across town, or even half a block away? Would families even know that?

Parents deserve better. So today, I’m introducing a new, intuitive, interactive tool to show what can be done to make basic data accessible to parents and help them answer perhaps the most fundamental question: Does my child feel safe?

I’ve chosen the two largest school districts in America, New York City and Los Angeles, for a very simple reason: Unlike many cities, New York and LA conduct comprehensive school climate surveys. And, unlike most major districts that conduct surveys, they make the full data set available to the public.

I’ve taken a slice of the data from the 2015–16 school culture surveys, questions pertaining to school order and safety, and placed it on a Google map so parents can quickly and easily see what students and teachers at their schools are saying — as well as how their school compares to others nearby. (Click here for a detailed explanation of how these maps were created and how school surveys were used.)

Here are New York City’s schools, color-coded to reflect the survey results; you can scan and zoom inside the map below, or click here for a full-screen version that you can search by specific address or school name.

To take stock of the individual survey results, click on the green, yellow, or red pin and see the pop-up window:

And here are similar groupings, mapped out across Los Angeles: you can scan and zoom below, or click here for a full-screen version that you can search by specific address or school name.

Again, to take stock of the individual survey results, click on the green, yellow, or red pin and see the pop-up window:

What percentage of teachers say order and discipline are maintained? What percentage say disruptive student behavior is a significant problem? Do students think their peers are respectful? Do they feel safe in the hallways of their school?

Parents in America’s two largest cities can now get a glimpse inside the black box, and see how their child’s school compares to one down the street.

Consider: A New York mother who sends her child to P.S. 306 in Brooklyn might be alarmed to learn that 68 percent of students say physical fights occur “most” or “all” of the time, 80 percent of students say their peers don’t respect each other, and 80 percent of teachers say order and discipline aren’t maintained.

Whereas, less than a half mile away, at Achievement First East New York, 10 percent of students say physical fights occur frequently, 35 percent report disrespect, and only 2 percent of teachers say order and discipline aren’t maintained. (You can see several more eye-opening case studies from New York City here — and navigate the city for yourself.)

A Los Angeles mother who sends her child to Barton Hill Elementary School in San Pedro may be disturbed to learn that 33 percent of students say they don’t feel safe, 82 percent say bullying is a problem, 83 percent of teachers say that disruptive behavior is a significant problem, and 92 percent of teachers say discipline is ineffective.

Whereas, less than a half mile away, at Crestwood Street Elementary School, less than a quarter of teachers think discipline is ineffective, less than a fifth think disruptive behavior is a significant problem, and only 37 percent of students say bullying is an issue. (You can see several more eye-opening case studies from Los Angeles here — and navigate the city for yourself.)

And all residents of both cities can see the depressing fact that poverty and school disorder track closely, but also hopeful signs that some schools are beating the odds.

The hope is that these maps will spark calls and conversations. Parents, armed with the knowledge of what students and teachers think, should call their schools and press them to do better. Principals, armed with data from other schools, should call their peers to have a conversation about what’s working and how to adopt it.

More urgently: Parents in districts that have school surveys but don’t share the data as openly as NYC and LA should press their school boards for more transparency, and parents in districts that don’t conduct any surveys at all should demand these data.

The data show every sign of being consistent and reliable: In both cities, there is a high correlation between students’ and teachers’ views of safety in their schools, suggesting that respondents are answering consistently and faithfully.

Elementary and secondary schools in each district are color-coded on the map: green means safe, yellow means somewhat safe, and red means less safe, judging by the percentage of students or teachers who give a negative answer to a consistent question. Admittedly, the coding is discretionary, but if, for example, more than a third of students in a NYC middle school say physical fights occur “most” or “all” of the time, it seems fair to assume something bad is happening.

Again, a longer discussion of the data and methods behind these maps can be found here. And you can click here for more snapshots and in-depth discussions of the New York City and Los Angeles findings.

Please browse through, take note and, most important, share this tool with other parents you know in New York or LA.

Max Eden is a senior fellow at the Manhattan Institute, specializing in education policy. Get the latest news about school climate and school safety, as well as access to new interactive tools that better help parents understand their neighborhood and school district, by signing up for The 74 Newsletter.

Injuries At Amish Farm Torn-Up When Three Tornadoes Touched Down In PA: NWS

Multiple people were hurt at an Amish farm by one of three tornadoes that touched down and did some serious damage in central Pennsylvania on Friday, May 27, authorities say.In less than one minute the first tornado touched down and destroyed a pole barn, moved a “very heavy farming auger” approximately 100 yards, lifted the roof off of an outbuilding, destroyed a pole barn, and forced an outdoor shed off of its foundation when it touched down on Hartzok Road in Franklin County at 11:45 a.m., according to a release by the ...

Multiple people were hurt at an Amish farm by one of three tornadoes that touched down and did some serious damage in central Pennsylvania on Friday, May 27, authorities say.

In less than one minute the first tornado touched down and destroyed a pole barn, moved a “very heavy farming auger” approximately 100 yards, lifted the roof off of an outbuilding, destroyed a pole barn, and forced an outdoor shed off of its foundation when it touched down on Hartzok Road in Franklin County at 11:45 a.m., according to a release by the National Weather Service.

The tornado then crossed the road and damaged a roof, fields, and snapped trees before it disappeared, NWS reports.

Nearly an hour later, a separate tornado tipped over a trail on Long Gap Road in Carlisle, Cumberland County, at 12:42 p.m., again lasting less than one minute, according to NWS.

The final tornado touched down in Lancaster County traveling from Kirkwood to Christiana between 2:11 and 2:16 p.m., NWS said in a statement.

It first touched down in the 400 block of Maple Shade Road, damaging trees and a building’s siding before blowing through a field behind the post office on Kirkwood Pike and slamming into a cinder block shed— carrying contents from inside the shed— before destroying another small shed— and again, gather and dropping the debris in the area hundreds of yards away, according to the release.

Then the tornado intensified with wind speeds up to 86 to 110 mph as it moved northeast— completely destroying a large barn, and partially destroying a second barn— completely removing one wall, partially removing another, and pulling off half of the roof on Farmdale Road, the release shows.

Flying debris caused minor injuries to one person on the property, before it moved on to rip up trees, dent a silo, and plow fields along its path through East Salem and Ridge roads, officials say.

The Amish farm property on Rosedale Road experienced the most damage with two barns and a shed destroyed, and “wooden beams from one of the barns were carried by the tornado as projectiles that penetrated through the (northwest) facing wall of another barn on the property,” a silo top was removed, and a home on the property being heavily damaged, officials stated in a release the following Tuesday.

The home had siding damage and a basement— where two people were sheltering from the storm—collapsed, leaving the pair injured with “minor cuts and scratches to at least two people taking shelter in the basement, according to the release.

The tornado continued to another farm, removing the roofs off two barns, partially removing the roof off another, damaging two silos, and collapsing a shed along Highland Road, the release details.

It finally began to slow down and dissipate after it removed the roof of a three farm’s barn on Rynear Road near Bells Run, according to the NWS.

All three tornados are considered weak on The Enhanced Fujita Scale.

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