BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Upper Freehold

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Upper Freehold, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Upper Freehold, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Upper Freehold

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Upper Freehold, NJ

Latest News in Upper Freehold, NJ

Rutgers Professor & Upper Freehold Township Resident, Dr. Peter DeSciscio, Installed As NJDA President

North Brunswick, NJ – Dr. Peter L. DeSciscio, who practices in South Amboy, was installed as the 153rd President of the New Jersey Dental Association on June 8 at the organization’s Semi-Annual House of Delegates Meeting.Dr. DeSciscio has been in private practice as well as a faculty member at Rutgers School of Dental Medicine since 1987.Dr. DeSciscio graduated The College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (now Rutgers) in 1985. Following a General Practice Residency at the Jersey City Medical Center he return...

North Brunswick, NJ – Dr. Peter L. DeSciscio, who practices in South Amboy, was installed as the 153rd President of the New Jersey Dental Association on June 8 at the organization’s Semi-Annual House of Delegates Meeting.

Dr. DeSciscio has been in private practice as well as a faculty member at Rutgers School of Dental Medicine since 1987.

Dr. DeSciscio graduated The College of Medicine and Dentistry of New Jersey (now Rutgers) in 1985. Following a General Practice Residency at the Jersey City Medical Center he returned to the New Jersey Dental School in Newark to begin his teaching career. He is currently a professor in the Department of Restorative Dentistry and has held numerous positions during his 35 years at the school including Assistant Dean, Government Affairs, Dental Director of the school-affiliated Plainfield Health Center, President of the Alumni Association, President of the Academic Assembly, and he currently serves on the Appointments and Promotions Committee. Dr. DeSciscio was the recipient of the 2004 Excellence in Teaching Award from the Foundation of Rutgers School of Dental Medicine.

Dr. DeSciscio joined the New Jersey Dental Association in 1990 and has held numerous leadership positions within the organization including Trustee, Secretary, Treasurer, and Vice President. He also served as President of the Middlesex County Dental Society (an NJDA component society) and was a recipient of the Presidential Recognition Award from NJDA.

“I have had the pleasure of knowing Dr. Peter DeSciscio for close to 30 years, ” said Dr. Maxine Feinberg, former American Dental Association President. “I am confident that NJDA, its’ members and the public will be well served during his tenure as President. I look forward to our continued collaboration, as I am certain he will continue to lead with passion and integrity.”

Dr. DeSciscio’s leadership experience extends beyond Rutgers and NJDA. He was a Board Member of the New Jersey State Board of Dentistry for 10 years and served as President of that body in 2006-2007. He was also President of both the Fauchard Dental Society of New Jersey and the New Jersey Academy of General Dentistry. Nationally, he was the President of the American Association of Dental Boards. Dr. DeSciscio has been inducted into both the American College of Dentists and the International College of Dentists.

In addition to serving as NJDA President for the 2022-23 term he currently holds positions as Vice Chair of the Exam Committee for the American Board of Dental Examiners (ADEX), Faculty Advisory Board member for Colgate Dental Educators, and Exam Committee member for the American Board of Dental Examiners Restorative Subcommittee.

Dr. DeSciscio was raised in Edison, New Jersey and attended St. Joseph’s High School in Metuchen. He then attended St. Peter’s College in Jersey City, where he received a Bachelor of Science Degree in Biology in 1981. While there, he was inducted into the Cross Keys Honor Society.

Dr. DeSciscio is the owner of Amboy Dental Arts, located at 210 Augusta Street in South Amboy, NJ. He resides with this wife Pina and their two daughters Gracemary and Sophia in Upper Freehold Township, NJ.

Dr. Peter L. DeSciscio, who practices in South Amboy, was installed as the 153rd President of the New Jersey Dental Association on June 8 at the organization’s Semi-Annual House of Delegates Meeting.

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Allentown officials keeping tabs on plans for Stein property

ALLENTOWN – Mayor Thomas Fritts has confirmed what residents have been saying for some time: there is surveying activity taking place on a parcel of land in Upper Freehold Township bordering Allentown that could be a prelude to commercial development.During a meeting of the mayor and Borough Council on Feb. 22, Fritts provided an update on the parcel that is commonly known as the Stein property.Probasco Drive in Allentown is adjacent to the Stein property in Upper Freehold on North Main Street (Route 539/524). The large t...

ALLENTOWN – Mayor Thomas Fritts has confirmed what residents have been saying for some time: there is surveying activity taking place on a parcel of land in Upper Freehold Township bordering Allentown that could be a prelude to commercial development.

During a meeting of the mayor and Borough Council on Feb. 22, Fritts provided an update on the parcel that is commonly known as the Stein property.

Probasco Drive in Allentown is adjacent to the Stein property in Upper Freehold on North Main Street (Route 539/524). The large tract of undeveloped land is near an exit from Interstate 195 to North Main Street.

The Stein property is in what Allentown officials refer to as a greenbelt around the borough.

During his comments, Fritts said, “There has been activity on the Stein property. I stopped by last week and a surveyor identified the property as a location for two potential warehouses.

“We are looking into various areas to prevent any development that is not good for Allentown. I have made it clear to (Upper Freehold) Mayor (LoriSue) Mount what Allentown does not want to see. The residents of Probasco Drive are not looking for that vista to be destroyed.”

Fritts said no application that proposes development on the Stein property has been filed in Upper Freehold. He also noted that in the past, officials in Upper Freehold have declined requests that applicants have made for variances from the township’s development regulations.

Regarding the possibility of purchasing the Stein property and preserving the tract as open space, Fritts said, “The management company that manages the estate is not interested in preservation; preservation pays pennies on the dollar.”

“We are doing everything in our power to embrace the fight” against warehouses, the mayor said. “Two warehouses on Main Street, where we already have traffic, would truly be a devastation to this historical borough. We are in this (fight) for the long haul.”

Fritts said if an application for the development of the Stein property is presented to a municipal board in Upper Freehold, he is hoping the members of that board would look closely at any request for variances from their community’s development standards.

As the discussion regarding the Stein property ended, Councilwoman Erica DeKranes said, “We are trying to make sure we know what is going on and to keep our borders the way they are.”

The prospect of commercial development near their homes has been a concern for residents of Probasco Drive for several years.

During a meeting of the mayor and Borough Council on Oct. 8, 2019, residents reported seeing surveyors on the Stein property.

The residents said they were concerned about the type of development that could be proposed on the land that is in Upper Freehold’s Highway Commercial zone.

The possibility of a warehouse or warehouses being constructed on the property was mentioned as a significant source of concern by the residents.

3 New Jersey cities named among best places to live

Money.com has released their annual list of the best places to live and three New Jersey towns made the top 50.The three cities are: Jersey City (#10), Fort Lee (#14) and Morristown (#30).About Jersey City, Money writes:"Potential residents have their choice of a wide variety of neighborhoods in New Jersey’s second-largest city, all with a distinct character. There are luxury condominiums in high rises on the water...

Money.com has released their annual list of the best places to live and three New Jersey towns made the top 50.

The three cities are: Jersey City (#10), Fort Lee (#14) and Morristown (#30).

About Jersey City, Money writes:

"Potential residents have their choice of a wide variety of neighborhoods in New Jersey’s second-largest city, all with a distinct character. There are luxury condominiums in high rises on the waterfront with sweeping skyline views, single-family homes in the Heights, new developments in Journal Square, and historic brownstones all across the town."

Jersey City also gets high marks for its diversity; 43% of residents were born outside the US. The restaurant scene, family attractions, and public parks all help elevate JC (as does its proximity to New York). The median income is $92,183 and the value of the average home is $605,831.

For Ft. Lee, its thriving Korean-American community, luxury skyrises, and tradition of the arts (especially cinema) make it a desirable place to live. The median household income is $92,282 and the median home price is $450,568.

Morristown is praised for being “quaint” and for “bustling with colonial history.” More from Money.com:

Morristown’s 20,000 residents enjoy a bustling, walkable downtown filled with shops and restaurants that surround the popular Morristown Green. The town hosts an annual Jazz & Blues music festival there, as well as a fall-themed festival that draws more than 60,000 visitors every year. The nearby Mayo Performing Arts Center attracts big names like Jerry Seinfeld and Chris Isaak.

The median income for a Morristown household is pretty high at $114,411; its median home price is pretty hefty at $649,000.

Maybe next year they can consider some New Jersey towns south of Morris County.

The top city on the list is Atlanta.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

How you can help NJ homeless and disabled veterans

Veterans Day is coming up on Friday, Nov. 11. Our struggling veterans need your help desperately!The award-winning 501(c)(3) nonprofit Independence for Veterans is gearing up for our 11th annual They Kept Us Safe, Let’s Keep Them Warm holiday collection benefiting the disabled and homeless veterans residing at two local veteran’s homeless shelters.As of Jan. 1 until today, they have hand-delivered $79,000+ worth of groceries, new clot...

Veterans Day is coming up on Friday, Nov. 11. Our struggling veterans need your help desperately!

The award-winning 501(c)(3) nonprofit Independence for Veterans is gearing up for our 11th annual They Kept Us Safe, Let’s Keep Them Warm holiday collection benefiting the disabled and homeless veterans residing at two local veteran’s homeless shelters.

As of Jan. 1 until today, they have hand-delivered $79,000+ worth of groceries, new clothing, toiletries, etc. to our veterans in need. They’re striving to hit $100,000 by year’s end. Amazing what we can do when we pull together as a community!

Sadly, winter is upon us and these veterans do not have vehicles, therefore, have to walk everywhere. The very least we can do is keep them warm and protected from the elements. On any given night, 40,000 veterans are sleeping on our streets.

The founder of this organization, Stacia McDonough, the widow of a decorated Vietnam Vet has been helping homeless veterans for 17 years. She wholeheartedly believes the public is not aware of how desperate this situation is. She says most people are not aware of the average of 22 veterans’ suicides per day. That’s almost one every hour of every day.

So, as we mark the day with some remembrances for our veterans with a day off from work or sales at stores, remember it's our duty to honor their sacrifices and do whatever we can to help.

Many of us have family members or friends who have served this great country. It's good to remember those among them who are not as well off. They Kept Us Safe, Let's Keep Them Warm, is the least we can do.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

What would happen to NJ if we were attacked by nuclear weapons?

We used NUKEMAP by Alex Wellerstein to see what would happen if a nuclear warhead hit New York, Philadelphia, Washington or New Jersey.

The models show what would happen in aerial detonation, meaning the bomb would be set off in the sky, causing considerable damage to structures and people below; or what would happen in a ground detonation, which would have the alarming result of nuclear fallout. The models do not take into account the number of casualties that would result from fallout.

Gallery Credit: Eric Scott

Home to nearly 4.4 million people, a nuclear attack on New York City would be catastrophic. New Jersey would suffer severe loss of life and property. (Photo by Afton Almaraz/Getty Images)

The blast would be felt as far away as Newark, Elizabeth, Nutley, Fort Lee and Englewood. Buildings would be damaged or destroyed.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns throughout Jersey City, Union, and Cliffside Park.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Deaths: 1.6 million

Injuries: 2.9 million

The blast would be felt as far away as Jersey City and Ridgefield.

It would likely destroy or severely damage Newark Liberty International Airport, the Holland and Lincoln tunnels, George Washington Bridge and the rail tunnels under the Hudson River.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns in West New York and Fort Lee. Fallout would generally be carried away from New Jersey as far away as New Hampshire.

Deaths: 1.3 million

Injuries: 1.4 million

Philadelphia

The blast would be felt up the Route 1 corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange.

Buildings would be destroyed as far away as Deptford, Voorhees, Riverside and Delanco.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Haddonfield, Cherry Hill, Cinnaminson and Riverton.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading as far away as Middletown and Neptune to the East and Mount Olive to the West.

Deaths: 539,000

Injuries: 845,000

The blast would be felt as far away as Cherry Hill, Deptford, Maple Shade and Moorestown.

Buildings would be destroyed from Neptune to Mount Olive.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Trenton, Plainfield, East Orange and Yonkers.

Deaths: 441,000

Injuries: 409,000

If a nuclear warhead hit New Jersey's Capitol, the effects would be felt deep into New Jersey and Pennsylvania

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Buildings would be destroyed from Burlington to Coxs Corner, Princeton, Plainsboro and Pennington.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Bordentown to Crosswicks, Lawrence and Ewing.

The Capitol Health Medical Center in Hopewell would be destroyed.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, Connecticut.

Deaths: 126,000

Injuries: 217,000

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mansfield to Crosswicks and Princeton.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Long Branch to Bedminster, Morristown, Spring Valley and Fort Lee.

Deaths: 108,000

Injuries: 97,000

In the heart of Central New Jersey, a nuclear blast in New Brunswick would cause the most widespread damage to the state.

The blast would be felt up the Route One corridor causing damage from Trenton to East Orange and into New York City.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from, Kingston to Marlboro, South Amboy, Woodbridge, Plainfield and Somerville.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Kendal Park to Spotswood, Metuchen, South Plainfield and Millstone.

Fallout would drift Northeast, spreading across most of Central and North Jersey into New York City and as far as Stamford, CT.

Deaths: 140,000

Injuries: 329,000

The blast would reverberate across the Delaware River to Philadelphia with shockwaves that would reach down to Burlington in the South and Upper Freehold to the East.

Rutgers University, SoFi Stadium and Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Spotswood to Millstone, Bound Brook, South Plainfield and Spotswood.

Thermal radiation would cause 3rd degree burns from Franklin Park to Woodbridge, East Brunswick, Sayreville and South Bound Brook.

Fallout would carry Northeast as far away as Elizabeth, Newark, New York City and Nashua, New Hampshire.

Deaths: 108,000

Injuries: 122,000

If a nuclear warhead hit Atlantic City, it would destroy more than 2/3rds of the Jersey Shore

While a nuclear blast in Atlantic City would spare most of inland New Jersey, it would destroy the barrier islands from Long Port to Toms River.

The casinos would fall, the boardwalks would burn and the sand would be contaminated for a generation. Atlantic City International Airport would be leveled.

Buildings would be destroyed from Pleasantville to Margate and Brigantine.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Linwood to Galloway and Longport.

Deaths: 57,000

Injuries: 70,000

Buildings would be destroyed from Linwood to Pleasantville and Absecon.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Longport to Barnegat Light.

Fallout would drift mostly out to sea, but would hit the Eastern half of Long Island up to Rhode Island.

Deaths: 57,000

Injuries: 75,000

A primary military target in New Jersey, a nuclear attack on the Joint Base would be devastating to a large part of the state.

While New Jersey does have a handful of military targets, the primary target is likely the Joint Base.

If a nuclear missle were to detonate over the base, the entire facility would be reduced to ash.

Buildings would be destroyed from Mount Holly to Manchester Township, Bordentown, Allentown and Red Valley.

Thermal radiation would cause third degree burns from Pemberton to Plumsted and Chesterfield.

Deaths: 14,000

Injuries: 40,000

Buildings would be destroyed from Pemberton to Georgetown and Plumsted.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns from Whitesbog to Georgetown and Arneytown.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Millstone, Freehold, Holmdel and Highlands and stretch all the way to Massachusetts.

Deaths: 9,000

Injuries: 14,000

While a direct nuclear strike on the U.S. Capitol would be devastating to our nation and government, the direct impact to New Jersey would be minimal.

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble, including the White House, Congress, Pentagon and monuments. Andrews Air Force Base, Annapolis and Arlington National Cemetery would be destroyed.

Deaths: 505,000

Injuries: 838,000

The entire DC area would be reduced to rubble and buildings would be destroyed from Alexandria, Virginia, to Silver Spring and Bethesda, Maryland.

Thermal radiation would cause third-degree burns up to six miles from ground zero.

Fallout would carry Northwest through Baltimore, Philadelphia into Trenton and as far as the Northern New Jersey border.

Deaths: 415,000

Injuries: 381,000

NJ weather: It’s only going to rain one day this time around

The big weather headline here is still a storm system set to dampen New Jersey's mood (and weather) on Thursday. It is not going to rain all day. In fact, rainfall totals and the severe thunderstorm threat have scaled back a bit. It's just going to be a flip to inclement and fairly unpleasant weather.We do need the rain, to avoid falling in another rainfall deficit hole. Unlike Ian's remnants, which soaked New Jersey for six days at the beginning of the month, this batch of rain will last less than a day.Other than that impendi...

The big weather headline here is still a storm system set to dampen New Jersey's mood (and weather) on Thursday. It is not going to rain all day. In fact, rainfall totals and the severe thunderstorm threat have scaled back a bit. It's just going to be a flip to inclement and fairly unpleasant weather.

We do need the rain, to avoid falling in another rainfall deficit hole. Unlike Ian's remnants, which soaked New Jersey for six days at the beginning of the month, this batch of rain will last less than a day.

Other than that impending burst of wet weather, the forecast looks great. Temperatures will be remarkably consistent, with daily highs coming close to 70 degrees every day through the end of the weekend.

No big weather issues, as we hold on to mild, pleasant conditions for one more day.

Your Wednesday is starting off with a chill in the air, as temperatures have tumbled into the 40s across inland New Jersey (and 50s along the coast). So, just like Monday and Tuesday, you'll want a jacket to start the day. But sunshine through Wednesday morning will push temperatures upward very quickly.

Clouds will increase into Wednesday afternoon. But high temperatures should still reach about 70 degrees, give or take. That is slightly above normal for mid October.

Skies will turn mostly cloudy Wednesday night. And I can't rule out a spot shower or sprinkle after 5 p.m.

Because of increased cloud cover and humidity, Wednesday night won't get that cold. In fact, it should be our warmest night in two and a half weeks (since September 26th). Low temperatures should dip into the upper 50s to around 60 degrees.

It's going to rain. Overall, I think it will be a relatively unpleasant, inclement-at-times day. But it won't be a total washout.

Forecast models are painting two different scenarios for Thursday.

The first, depicted by the NAM (mesoscale) model puts scattered showers over New Jersey starting around 10 a.m. Thursday, lasting through mid-afternoon (say, 4 p.m.) Then we would see one more big push of thunderstorms between 10 p.m. Thursday night and 4 a.m. Friday morning.

On the other hand, both the GFS and Euro (long-range) models glom the two rounds of rain together, lasting from about 11 a.m. Thursday through 4 a.m. Friday. The "main event" with heavier rain and strongest storm cells would be around the early evening (dinnertime) hours.

It's difficult to give a confident, accurate, pinpoint forecast when model guidance is so wishy-washy. But the truth (and therefore, my forecast) is somewhere in the middle. Here's what I'm thinking:—Thursday morning probably starts dry, although mostly cloudy and windy. (Possible ambient gusts to 30 mph throughout the day.)—Scattered showers will move in eventually Thursday midday, afternoon and evening.—The biggest push of rain — featuring pockets of heavy stuff and strong thunderstorm cells — will be late-day, around the early evening/dinnertime hours.—Rain will taper off Thursday night, with skies clearing by daybreak Friday morning.—There is a slight risk of severe weather, mainly from gusty winds. (The tornado threat is very low, but not zero.)—Total rainfall will range from just less than a half-inch in South Jersey to almost an inch in North Jersey. Locally higher amounts are possible from downpours, although any flooding concern is very isolated.—Temperatures don't budge much, despite the clouds, the rain, and the cold front in the vicinity. Highs on Thursday will be seasonable, around 65 to 70 degrees.

Flipping back to sunshine and dry, pleasant weather.

Will we see blue skies by early morning or late morning? Eh, not sure. It doesn't matter though, as we enjoy another gorgeous day. High temperatures will end up in the upper 60s to around 70.

An outstanding start to the weekend.

Having said that, Saturday morning will bring a return of chilly temperatures, likely in the 40s. Any frost threat would be very limited, to the coldest corners of the state only.

Under mostly sunny skies, highs will push into the lower 70s Saturday afternoon. A great day to enjoy all those fantastic fall activities.

Pretty nice. Although I can't put forth a completely dry forecast.

A shower chance will crop up both early and late on Sunday. But if you can dodge those raindrops, or plan any outings in the middle of the day, you should be fine.

Look for periods of sun and clouds Sunday, with high temperatures once again aiming for the lower 70s.

October is notorious for big cold fronts — bursts of cold, wind, and rain. And the next series of fronts is on the horizon for early next week.

Although rain chances are minimal, temperatures are going to take another notable dip. The latest forecast shows highs in the 60s on Monday and only 50s on Tuesday.

By the middle of next week — Tuesday or especially Wednesday morning — we could also see our first truly widespread frost/freeze of the season across New Jersey. That is pretty much right on schedule.

We also look forward to fall foliage colors peaking through the last third of October.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

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