BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Upper Freehold

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Upper Freehold, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Upper Freehold, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Upper Freehold, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Upper Freehold

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Upper Freehold, NJ

Latest News in Upper Freehold, NJ

News Transcript Datebook, Sept. 14

• Rutgers Master Gardeners of Monmouth County will present Birds, Bugs and Beyond, Celebrating Nature, a free festival for children of all ages, outdoors from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 8 (rain or shine) at the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Agriculture Building, 4000 Kozloski Road, Freehold Township. There will be nature-inspired activities, crafts and educational displays, 4-H animals, insects and reptiles, and more. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Details: 732-303-7614.• The Monmouth County...

• Rutgers Master Gardeners of Monmouth County will present Birds, Bugs and Beyond, Celebrating Nature, a free festival for children of all ages, outdoors from noon to 4 p.m. Oct. 8 (rain or shine) at the Rutgers Cooperative Extension Agriculture Building, 4000 Kozloski Road, Freehold Township. There will be nature-inspired activities, crafts and educational displays, 4-H animals, insects and reptiles, and more. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Details: 732-303-7614.

• The Monmouth County Retired Educators Association will meet at 11 a.m. Oct. 11 at the Waterview Pavilion, Belmar. Prior to the meeting, PAC endorsed candidates running for office will be available for members to meet and voice their concerns. Members are encouraged to bring a non-perishable donation for the food bank. For luncheon reservations, contact [email protected] Checks payable to MCREA for $30 should be mailed to Sue Shrott, 162 Harbor Circle Drive, Freehold, NJ 07728 and received before Sept. 30. Check the MCREA Facebook page or website for updates. New members are always welcome.

• The 26th annual Monmouth County Clerk’s Archives and History Day will be held on Oct. 1 at the Robert J. Collins Arena at Brookdale Community College, Lincroft, beginning at 9 a.m. The event is organized by the Monmouth County Clerk’s Archives Division. More than 50 local and state historical societies, museums and archives will set up tables relating to the mission and activities of their organizations. All are invited to attend the free event. To view the preliminary program, visit MonmouthCountyClerk.com/Archives

• The Holiday Made in Monmouth event will take place from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Dec. 10 in the Robert J. Collins Arena on the campus of Brookdale Community College, Route 520, Lincroft (the original date was Dec. 3). Vendor registration will open at 10 a.m. Sept. 27. Details: 732-431-7387.

• The 13th annual Foodstock will take place on Oct. 15 at the Freehold Township Independent Fire Company No. 1, Stillwells Corner Road, Freehold Township, from 1-6 p.m. Foodstock NJ assists with the needs of less fortunate community members who are struggling to put food on their table. Everyone is invited to participate in Foodstock. Suggested donations are non-perishable food items, a tax deductible monetary donation or a Foodstock T-shirt sponsorship ($250 or $500). All are welcome to enjoy a day of music, food and fun. Each attendee is asked to provide at least 50 pounds of nonperishable food. Details: foodstocknj.org

• Marty’s Place Howl-o-Ween Family Fest will be held from noon to 5 p.m. Oct. 22 at Marty’s Place, 118 Route 526, Upper Freehold Township. All proceeds will benefit the senior dogs cared for by Marty’s Place. This is a dog-friendly event. Highlights will include canine costume contests, a leisurely walk, agility demonstrations, hayrides, a pet photo booth, police dog demonstrations, live music from AlterEgo, vendors, food trucks and more. All humans and canines are welcome to dress in costume. Prizes will be awarded in several categories. Admission is $5 for adults; children under 6 are free.

• Dove Hospice Services of New Jersey is seeking volunteers who are willing to make a difference with individuals who are experiencing the challenge of end-of-life. Volunteers dedicate a small amount of time each month to provide companionship-friendly visits; play cards; sewing, knitting or craft projects; music enrichment; pet therapy; and office or administrative assistance. Dove Hospice Services is also seeking veterans who are interested in providing compassion, support and outreach to fellow veterans and their families. Visits can be made to individuals living in facilities or private homes. Ongoing training is provided. Volunteers must be 18 or older and a COVID vaccine is required. Details: Michelle Rutigliano, 732-405-3035.

• The Guild of Creative Art, 620 Broad St., Shrewsbury, is hosting a September solo exhibit featuring works by Paul Hansen from Sept. 3-28. Viewing hours are Tuesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Details: 732-741-1441.

• The Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District Board of Education will hold the following meetings: Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., regular action meeting, Wemrock Brook School, 118 Millhurst Road, Manalapan. The meetings are open to the public.

• The Jewish Heritage Museum of Monmouth County, Freehold Township, will welcome rabbi-turned-cabaret singer Deborah Zecher in a cabaret style musical in-person and Zoom event on Sept. 18 at 4 p.m. Admission is $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members. Zecher describes herself as “a rabbi who sings the Great American songbook and more.” Make reservations by visiting www.jhmomc.org, or by calling 732-252-6990.

• Freehold Elks Lodge No. 1454 will hold an All-U-Can-Eat Sunday Breakfast from 9-11:30 a.m. on the third Sunday of every month at the lodge, 73 E. Main St., Freehold Borough. Extensive menu cooked to order. Adults, $11; children 12 and younger, $5.

• New Jersey Blood Services, a division of New York Blood Center, is conducting blood drives which are open to the public. The following drives are scheduled: Sept. 23, Freehold Raceway Mall, Route 9, Freehold Township, 12:30-6:30 p.m.; Sept. 30, Co-Cathedral of St. Robert Bellarmine, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold Township, 12:30-6:30 p.m. To donate blood or for information about how to organize a blood drive, call 1-800-933-2566 or visit www.nybloodcenter.org

• A farmers market will be held every Friday from July through October, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Monmouth County Hall of Records plaza, Main Street, Freehold Borough.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Historic Battery Lewis tours on Sept. 17, 18, 24 and 25 from noon to 4 p.m. at Hartshorne Woods Park, Highlands – Rocky Point section. Tour the restored Historic Battery Lewis and learn about the history of this former coastal defense site. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host mill demonstrations on Sept. 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. at Historic Walnford, Walnford Road, Upper Freehold Township. See the 19th century grist mill in action. Each demonstration lasts about 15 minutes. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Seabrook-Wilson House tours on Sept. 18 and 25 from 1-4 p.m. at Bayshore Waterfront Park, Middletown. Visit the house which dates back to the early 1700s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and see displays about the ecology of the bay and local history. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host the Casual Birder on Sept. 20 at 9 a.m. at Holmdel Park, Holmdel – meet at the Pond View shelter building. Join a naturalist for a morning bird walk (approximately 90 minutes). No need to be an expert at identifying birds to enjoy. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host a Fall Plant Swap on Sept. 17. Plant intake from 8:30-10 a.m. Plant selection starts at 10 a.m. The event will be held at Tatum Park, Middletown – use the Red Hill Road entrance. Bring perennials in 1-quart, 1-gallon or 2-gallon containers and take home the same size and number of plants. Label all plants. Houseplants may also be exchanged, but no annuals. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host the Wind and Sea Festival on Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Bayshore Waterfront Park, Middletown. Celebrate all things water-related such as kayaking, fishing, kite flying, sandcastle building and more during a family friendly festival. Admission and parking are free. Some activities may have a fee. Parking at the Belford Ferry Terminal. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Preserving the Harvest on Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. Learn about 19th century techniques for food preservation such as salting, pickling, drying and jelling. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host a Harvest Home Festival on Sept. 25 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. This old-fashioned fair is reminiscent of the 1890s. Visitors can enjoy games, wagon rides and live entertainment. Admission and parking are free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Concert in the Park: A Night of Jazz and Blues on Sept. 30 from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Thompson Park Theater Barn, Lincroft. The roots of blues and jazz music run deep at the Jersey Shore. Listen to talent from the area. Bring chairs or blankets, food and soft drinks. The concert will be held outdoors, but will move indoors if the weather is inclement. All ages welcome; under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• Monmouth County officials have scheduled the following paper shredding events: Sept. 24, Marlboro Municipal Complex, 1979 Township Drive; Oct. 1, Colts Neck, town hall parking lot, 124 Cedar Drive; Oct. 8, Freehold Township Municipal Building, 1 Municipal Plaza. All shredding events will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. County residents may shred up to 100 pounds of documents. Large binder clips must be removed from documents; staples and paper clips can remain. Information about the paper shredding events and recycling can be found in the recycling section of the county’s website, www.visitmonmouth.com, or call 732-683-8686, ext. 8967.

• Women of Color discussion group is an online meeting held once a month (third Tuesday at 5:30 pm) to discuss issues, coping strategies and resources relevant to women of color. Offered by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey. Upcoming meeting dates are Sept. 20, Oct. 18, Nov. 22 and Dec. 20. Email [email protected] to receive a link.

• “A Gathering of Womyn of Color” is an online group that meets once a month for all LGBTQ womyn of color in the Black, Indigenous, People of Color community. The group is an open discussion of multiple topics. The group meets on the first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. Upcoming dates are Oct. 6, Nov. 3 and Dec. 1. Offered by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, the agency’s PEWS program and the Emotional Support for Families of Color Initiative. To receive a link, email [email protected]

• The Monmouth County Library offers six classes available at any time and without any advance registration on virtual Yoga, highlighting breathing, movement, stretching and other activities. Each program is offered at https://ly/MonCoLibraryYoga. The programs are offered by Steven Russell of Becoming Sound. Interested individuals may choose their own path with movements from six of the most popular library video class series. Sessions are Yoga Breathing; Yoga Stretching; Yoga Movement; Yoga Stretching with Support; Yoga at Home on the Floor; and Yoga at Home Standing. Individuals should consult a physician before starting any exercise program.

• Samaritan Center operates a food pantry to provide supplementary food for those in need in Manalapan, Marlboro, Morganville, Englishtown and Millstone Township. For information, call 732-446-1142 and make an appointment. Donations of funds and food are gratefully accepted to support the operation of the center.

Items for the Datebook may be sent to [email protected] Please send items at least two weeks prior to a scheduled event.

New liquor law signed by NJ governor is called a ‘game changer’

Starting this fall, New Jersey households can have alcoholic beverages delivered to their doorsteps by such popular services as DoorDash, Instacart and Amazon Flex.The Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control has issued a special ruling for third-party permits that allow delivery services to enter formal agreements with restaurants, bars, and liquor stores, Acting Attorney General Matthew Platkin announced on Friday.An online application for the new permit, which will carry a $2,000 annual fee, will be available exclusively on th...

Starting this fall, New Jersey households can have alcoholic beverages delivered to their doorsteps by such popular services as DoorDash, Instacart and Amazon Flex.

The Division of Alcoholic Beverage Control has issued a special ruling for third-party permits that allow delivery services to enter formal agreements with restaurants, bars, and liquor stores, Acting Attorney General Matthew Platkin announced on Friday.

An online application for the new permit, which will carry a $2,000 annual fee, will be available exclusively on the Division’s licensing system beginning Oct. 1.

The independent contractors delivering alcoholic beverages to customers’ residences on behalf of New Jersey retail licensees will be able to charge “a fixed fee for their delivery services.”

ABC Director James Graziano called it a “game changer.”

The new permit would only be an option for restaurants, bars, and liquor stores – which operate under retail licenses that have statutory privileges to sell and deliver alcoholic beverages for off-premise consumption.

Craft breweries and distilleries — and other businesses operating under manufacturing licenses — do not currently have “statutory delivery privileges” and would not be authorized to use such services, Platkin said.

Also not allowed under the new rules are alcohol deliveries to the campus of any college or university, or to any customers who are already drunk or younger than 21.

“The demand for delivery services exploded during the COVID-19 pandemic and the Third-Party Delivery Permit expands that market in New Jersey and allows retail licensees to tap into it,” Platkin said in a written release.

“This new permit strikes a balance that has been the hallmark of the Murphy Administration to continue innovation and growth in business but without sacrificing or jeopardizing public safety. This is also a boon for consumers who have grown accustomed to using smartphone delivery apps to order everything from groceries to gourmet meals,” he continued.

Currently, ABC regulations permit only licensed retailers and transporters to deliver alcoholic beverages in New Jersey.

Permit holders would be responsible for ensuring that its delivery workers follow required procedures, avoiding the following:

— leaving alcoholic beverages unattended or storing alcoholic beverages overnight;

— subcontracting a delivery of alcoholic beverages;

— delivering alcoholic beverages to customers who are actually or apparently intoxicated or under the legal age to purchase or consume alcohol

— delivering alcoholic beverages to the campus of any college or university.

Violations could result in a permit being suspended or taken away, permanently.

“Opening the door to allow for third-party services to deliver alcoholic beverages to New Jersey residents will allow our local businesses to adapt to the ever-changing world of technology and e-commerce,” Gov. Phil Murphy said in a written statement.

The New Jersey Licensed Beverage Association and New Jersey Liquor Store Alliance were collaborators on the updated ABC ruling, Platkin added.

Erin Vogt is a reporter and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach her at [email protected]

NJ gas tax to drop Oct. 1 but only barely

New Jersey's gas tax rate will drop by a penny on Oct. 1.The state Treasury Department reviews the gas tax based upon consumption and revenue generated in order to generate a minimum of $2 billion per year needed for $16 billion worth of infrastructure projects paid for by the Transportation Trust Fund. Gov. Chris Christie signed the tax into law in 2016."Because actual consumption in Fiscal Year 2022 was moderately above our projections made last August, and consumption in the current fiscal year is projected to be slight...

New Jersey's gas tax rate will drop by a penny on Oct. 1.

The state Treasury Department reviews the gas tax based upon consumption and revenue generated in order to generate a minimum of $2 billion per year needed for $16 billion worth of infrastructure projects paid for by the Transportation Trust Fund. Gov. Chris Christie signed the tax into law in 2016.

"Because actual consumption in Fiscal Year 2022 was moderately above our projections made last August, and consumption in the current fiscal year is projected to be slightly above last fiscal year’s levels, our analysis of the formula dictates a 1.0 cent decrease this coming October,” State Treasurer Elizabeth Maher Muoio said in a statement.

The Petroleum Products Gross Receipts tax will drop from 31.9 cents to 30.9 cents for gasoline and from 35.9 cents to 34.9 cents for diesel fuel. The Motor Fuels Tax is fixed at 10.5 cents for gasoline and 13.5 cents for diesel. The totals effective October 1 are 41.4 cents for gas and 48.4 cents for diesel respectively.

The gas tax fell 8 cents per gallon in August 2021.

Gov. Phil Murphy has cited the requirements of the Transportation Trust Fund as the reason the state could not reduce or eliminate the gas tax when prices were climbing in the spring and early summer towards $5 per gallon.

GOP State Sen. Ed Durr said the decrease is not going to have a real impact on the price at the pump and might only save drivers 15 cents per week. He pushed for support for his bill that would provide drivers immediate $500 rebates to offset gas prices.

“The immediate $500 rebate I proposed would help a lot of New Jersey families who can’t keep up as costs continue to rise. It would make a much bigger difference than 15 cents," Durr said.

After peaking at an average of $5.059 in June average prices have dropped back to $3.94 according to AAA's latest survey. The U.S. average is $3.85.

Tom Kloza, global head of energy analysis for the Oil Price Information Service, said this trend has been continuing because people are driving less and the weather has been cooperative.

Kloza said barring some major weather event in the Gulf of Mexico, prices should continue to fall.

Previous reporting by David Matthau was used in this report.

Dan Alexander is a reporter for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

If New Jersey towns were Jersey girls

Towns can have a vibe. Especially New Jersey towns. We have cities and suburbs and rural places and the shore. Towns here have more defining characteristics than most states. Their own personality if you will.Just like women.What makes a woman special to one can be a turnoff to another. Again, just like towns.So what if Jersey towns were Jersey girls? Pull up a chair. It would go something like this.If Jersey towns were Jersey girls…If Jersey towns were Jersey GirlsYour frie...

Towns can have a vibe. Especially New Jersey towns. We have cities and suburbs and rural places and the shore. Towns here have more defining characteristics than most states. Their own personality if you will.

Just like women.

What makes a woman special to one can be a turnoff to another. Again, just like towns.

So what if Jersey towns were Jersey girls? Pull up a chair. It would go something like this.

If Jersey towns were Jersey girls…

If Jersey towns were Jersey Girls

Your friends call you Ho’ for short. You hate plastic and styrofoam so you’ve sworn off plastic bags and styrofoam containers. Plastic surgery is still okay. Your fav holiday is Christmas because you get to wear your slutty Santa suit with the mini-skirt and get drunk at every bar in town. Your fav old movie is "On The Waterfront" and your grandma went out with some guy named Sinatra.

You’re a tad old-fashioned and you like to walk wherever you go. You’re often at first drawn to antique shops then wonder why the hell you thought this would be fun once you’re inside. You’ve been inseparable from your BFF New Hope since grade school and your parents think she’s a bad influence. No wonder what with the head shops and new agey weirdness she’s always dragging you to! Your favorite ice cream flavor is lime cilantro from oWowCow Creamery because vanilla just wasn’t pretentious enough. You swear you once saw the ghost of a football player with his head twisted backwards over at the old high school.

First off, there’s the whole two-name thing. Mary Jo, Laurie Ann, Theresa Marie, Seaside Heights. Why are girls like you so special you think you deserve two names? And the tattoos. You’re covered in them. You have so many tattoos you don’t know which ones are henna and which ones are hepatitis. Can you stop with the piercings? When was the last time you read a book? And no, the drink menu at Spicy’s doesn’t count as a book.

With all your dysfunction you do have a good heart though, helping out special needs kids once a year by throwing yourself into the freezing ocean. Plus you’re always willing to give an 8-year-old with a bicycle a summer job as a cop.

You’re eternally angry with your parents for naming you Succasunna because, well, children are cruel. Any shortened form of Succasunna is insulting. Hey Suck, what’s up?! Also, nothing fun ever happens to you. No one interesting ever comes to see you. In short, you’re boring.

You're a tomboy through and through. You like wearing jeans and boots and your idea of a good time is throwing hay bales around like it's nothing. You drive a pickup truck. You went into mourning when Troy Gentry's helicopter went down, and who could blame you? You voted for Trump. The first boy you kissed was probably behind a church or in the middle of an apple orchard or something equally quaint. You laugh at people who are afraid of bears. You have an incredible work ethic and you're Jersey Strong but very feminine at the same time and you don't take crap from anybody.

You're a person who loves to point out the weird friends you have. The weirder they are the more you need to be friends with them. You're still searching for an albino little person communist who is gender fluid to complete your collection. You crave diversity and look for drama. You wear as high-end fashion as your family lets you get away with because you rarely buy your own clothes. You voted for Hillary because you didn't know better.

Girls named Princeton tend to hang out with other girls named Princeton but it's okay because you're all very diverse, and that's what matters. You once ran across a girl named Blairstown and you were pretty sure she was from another planet. You know you're better than everyone and you will probably die by wandering into traffic without looking.

You've always had self-esteem issues and spent your life wishing you were that girl Clark. You shouldn't. Clark spent her life wishing she were that girl Princeton.

You're the kind of girl who likes to stand next to Rahway because you think it makes you look better.

You are the ultimate party girl. You like to get your tan on. You live for Wawa. In fact, you probably have a tattoo of their logo somewhere on your body. You go to a club every chance you get. You recently broke up with a boy named Vineland and just in time. He was going to take you nowhere.

You used to be a straight female. But then you went broke, got your act together, and now identify as lesbian. You're one of the few Jersey girls on a mission to greatness. You're the ultimate comeback queen. You love music more than most. You're friendly, outgoing, smart, and accepting. Other Jersey girls wish they could be you.

Sadly you're a Jersey girl who's seen better days. You used to have a plan in life but anymore you just find yourself adrift. You were never the most beautiful girl around, but lately you look like a homeless punching bag. Let's just say your personality has become that of Bhad Bhabie, the "Cash me ousside" girl. But hang in there. It could be worse. You could be Atlantic City.

You're bipolar. On one hand, you have these manic periods where everything seems great, then you have these downswings where all you can see is desperation and poverty. You're terrible at handling money and had to move back in with your dad who put you on a strict allowance. You grasp at straws trying to convince people you're getting along fine when really your best days are long behind you. You've met a lot of celebrities over the years, but they probably wouldn't remember you if you ran into them in an elevator.

You are horribly misunderstood. You are bullied a lot. People pick on you for the clothes you wear and the way you drive your car into buildings and trashcans. They are just jealous. You have a wide circle of friends but tend to be a homebody on Friday nights.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Jeff Deminski only.

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News Transcript Datebook, Aug. 31

• The Guild of Creative Art, 620 Broad St., Shrewsbury, will host a September solo exhibit featuring works by Paul Hansen from Sept. 3-28, with an opening reception on Sept. 11 from 3-5 p.m. Viewing hours are Tuesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Details: 732-741-1441.• Residents of all towns are invited to enjoy a pasta dinner at the Historic Village Inn, corner of the Main and Water streets, Englishtown, from noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 3. Guests may eat in ...

• The Guild of Creative Art, 620 Broad St., Shrewsbury, will host a September solo exhibit featuring works by Paul Hansen from Sept. 3-28, with an opening reception on Sept. 11 from 3-5 p.m. Viewing hours are Tuesday through Friday, 9:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., and Saturday, 10 a.m. to 3 p.m. Details: 732-741-1441.

• Residents of all towns are invited to enjoy a pasta dinner at the Historic Village Inn, corner of the Main and Water streets, Englishtown, from noon to 5 p.m. Sept. 3. Guests may eat in or take out. Cost: adults, $15; children under 12, $10. Proceeds from the pasta dinner will support the local historic landmark.

• The Manalapan-Englishtown Regional School District Board of Education will hold the following meetings: Sept. 6, 7:30 p.m., regular action meeting, Wemrock Brook School, 118 Millhurst Road, Manalapan; and Sept. 20, 7:30 p.m., regular action meeting, Wemrock Brook School, 118 Millhurst Road, Manalapan. The meetings are open to the public.

• The Jewish Heritage Museum of Monmouth County, Freehold Township, will welcome rabbi-turned-cabaret singer Deborah Zecher in a cabaret style musical in-person and Zoom event on Sept. 18 at 4 p.m. Admission is $15 for museum members and $20 for non-members. Zecher describes herself as “a rabbi who sings the Great American songbook and more.” Make reservations by visiting www.jhmomc.org, or by calling 732-252-6990.

• Freehold Elks Lodge No. 1454 will hold an All-U-Can-Eat Sunday Breakfast from 9-11:30 a.m. on the third Sunday of every month at the lodge, 73 E. Main St., Freehold Borough. Extensive menu cooked to order. Adults, $11; children 12 and younger, $5.

• New Jersey Blood Services, a division of New York Blood Center, is conducting blood drives which are open to the public. The following drives are scheduled: Sept. 1, Freehold Raceway Mall, Route 9, Freehold Township, 12:30-6:30 p.m.; Sept. 23, Freehold Raceway Mall, Route 9, Freehold Township, 12:30-6:30 p.m.; Sept. 30, Co-Cathedral of St. Robert Bellarmine, 61 Georgia Road, Freehold Township, 12:30-6:30 p.m. To donate blood or for information about how to organize a blood drive, call 1-800-933-2566 or visit www.nybloodcenter.org

• A farmers market will be held every Friday from July through October, from 11 a.m. to 4 p.m., at the Monmouth County Hall of Records plaza, Main Street, Freehold Borough.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Piano Ballads from the Turn of the Century on Sept. 3 from 1-3 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. Turn-of-the-19th-century ballads will be performed in the farmhouse. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Historic Battery Lewis tours on Sept. 3, 4, 10, 17, 18, 24 and 25 from noon to 4 p.m. and Sept. 11 from 1-4 p.m. at Hartshorne Woods Park, Highlands – Rocky Point section. Tour the restored Historic Battery Lewis and learn about the history of this former coastal defense site. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Mill Demonstrations on Sept. 3, 4, 10, 11, 17, 18, 24 and 25 at 12:30 p.m., 1:30 p.m., 2:30 p.m. and 3:30 p.m. at Historic Walnford, Walnford Road, Upper Freehold Township. See the 19th century grist mill in action. Each demonstration lasts about 15 minutes. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Seabrook-Wilson House tours on Sept. 4, 11, 18 and 25 from 1-4 p.m. at Bayshore Waterfront Park, Middletown. Visit the house which dates back to the early 1700s and is listed on the National Register of Historic Places, and see displays about the ecology of the bay and local history. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host the Casual Birder on Sept. 13 at 9 a.m. at the Manasquan Reservoir Visitor Center, Howell, and on Sept. 20 at 9 a.m. at Holmdel Park, Holmdel – meet at the Pond View shelter building. Join a naturalist for a morning bird walk (approximately 90 minutes). No need to be an expert at identifying birds to enjoy. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host a cookstove demonstration on Sept. 10 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. See what’s cooking on the woodstove and discover how recipes, cooking techniques and kitchens have changed since the 1890s. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Accordion Melodies of the 1890s on Sept. 10 from 1-3 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. Hear melodies of the 1890s played on the accordion. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Bonsai Day on Sept. 11 from noon to 4 p.m. at Deep Cut Gardens, Middletown. Experience this intricate and ancient art through demonstrations and displays, with experts on hand to answer questions. Presented by the Monmouth County Park System and the Deep Cut Bonsai Society. Admission and parking are free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host a Fall Plant Swap on Sept. 17. Plant intake from 8:30-10 a.m. Plant selection starts at 10 a.m. The event will be held at Tatum Park, Middletown – use the Red Hill Road entrance. Bring perennials in 1-quart, 1-gallon or 2-gallon containers and take home the same size and number of plants. Label all plants. Houseplants may also be exchanged, but no annuals. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host the Wind and Sea Festival on Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Bayshore Waterfront Park, Middletown. Celebrate all things water-related such as kayaking, fishing, kite flying, sandcastle building and more during a family friendly festival. Admission and parking are free. Some activities may have a fee. Parking at the Belford Ferry Terminal. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Preserving the Harvest on Sept. 17 from 11 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. Learn about 19th century techniques for food preservation such as salting, pickling, drying and jelling. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host a Harvest Home Festival on Sept. 25 from 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. at Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel. This old-fashioned fair is reminiscent of the 1890s. Visitors can enjoy games, wagon rides and live entertainment. Admission and parking are free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• The Monmouth County Park System will host Concert in the Park: A Night of Jazz and Blues on Sept. 30 from 7-8:30 p.m. at the Thompson Park Theater Barn, Lincroft The roots of blues and jazz music run deep at the Jersey Shore. Listen to talent from the area. Bring chairs or blankets, food and soft drinks. The concert will be held outdoors, but will move indoors if the weather is inclement. All ages welcome; under 18 must be accompanied by an adult. Free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• Monmouth County officials have scheduled the following paper shredding events: Sept. 24, Marlboro Municipal Complex, 1979 Township Drive; Oct. 1, Colts Neck, town hall parking lot, 124 Cedar Drive; Oct. 8, Freehold Township Municipal Building, 1 Municipal Plaza. All shredding events will be held from 9 a.m. to 1 p.m. County residents may shred up to 100 pounds of documents. Large binder clips must be removed from documents; staples and paper clips can remain. Information about the paper shredding events and recycling can be found in the recycling section of the county’s website, www.visitmonmouth.com, or call 732-683-8686, ext. 8967.

• Women of Color discussion group is an online meeting held once a month (third Tuesday at 5:30 pm) to discuss issues, coping strategies and resources relevant to women of color. Offered by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey. Upcoming meeting dates are Sept. 20, Oct. 18, Nov. 22 and Dec. 20. Email [email protected] to receive a link.

• “A Gathering of Womyn of Color” is an online group that meets once a month for all LGBTQ womyn of color in the Black, Indigenous, People of Color community. The group is an open discussion of multiple topics. The group meets on the first Thursday of the month at 6 p.m. Upcoming dates are Sept. 1, Oct. 6, Nov. 3 and Dec. 1. Offered by the Mental Health Association in New Jersey, the agency’s PEWS program and the Emotional Support for Families of Color Initiative. To receive a link, email [email protected]

• The Monmouth County Park System will present the “Thrive” exhibit at Historic Walnford, Walnford Road, Upper Freehold Township. The interdisciplinary art exhibit explores the cyclical nature of the world around us. Exhibit runs through July 7, 2023 and is open daily from 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Admission and parking are free. Details: 732-842-4000.

• A new fellowship has started at the Morganville United Methodist Church, 215 Conover Road, Marlboro. Pizza with God features a pizza meal followed by music and devotions with crafts for youngsters. Come as you are and bring a dessert to share. The program will be held on the first Saturday of every month. Registration is requested on the church’s Facebook page, but is not required to attend. Details: Harry Cross, 908-770-6607.

• The Monmouth County Library offers six classes available at any time and without any advance registration on virtual Yoga, highlighting breathing, movement, stretching and other activities. Each program is offered at https://ly/MonCoLibraryYoga. The programs are offered by Steven Russell of Becoming Sound. Interested individuals may choose their own path with movements from six of the most popular library video class series. Sessions are Yoga Breathing; Yoga Stretching; Yoga Movement; Yoga Stretching with Support; Yoga at Home on the Floor; and Yoga at Home Standing. Individuals should consult a physician before starting any exercise program.

• Samaritan Center operates a food pantry to provide supplementary food for those in need in Manalapan, Marlboro, Morganville, Englishtown and Millstone Township. For information, call 732-446-1142 and make an appointment. Donations of funds and food are gratefully accepted to support the operation of the center.

Items for the Datebook may be sent to [email protected] Please send items at least two weeks prior to a scheduled event.

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