BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Upper Freehold

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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Basement Waterproofing in Upper Freehold

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Upper Freehold:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Upper Freehold

It’s baby wildlife season in NJ: Don’t move them, don’t touch them

Late spring and early summer in New Jersey is known as "baby season." The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife wants to remind residents that if find a fawn, baby rabbit, fox, bird, raccoon or any other animal just hanging out in your backyard in one spot, don\'t move it.Often, the lives of many young animals are disrupted by well-intentioned people attempting to "save" their lives. But you could be doing them more harm than good.Carole Stanko, Wildlife Management Bureau chief at Division of Fish and Wil...

Late spring and early summer in New Jersey is known as "baby season." The New Jersey Division of Fish and Wildlife wants to remind residents that if find a fawn, baby rabbit, fox, bird, raccoon or any other animal just hanging out in your backyard in one spot, don\'t move it.

Often, the lives of many young animals are disrupted by well-intentioned people attempting to "save" their lives. But you could be doing them more harm than good.

Carole Stanko, Wildlife Management Bureau chief at Division of Fish and Wildlife, said the babies are designed to keep still in one spot so as not to attract predators. Many people misinterpret their stillness as either being sick or injured when that is often not the case.

Leave a fawn alone if found in the yard hidden by an air conditioning unit or a recycling can. Stanko said fawns are born with spots to keep them camouflaged from predators early in life. They also lack a scent so they stay undetected. In the first two or three weeks of life, fawns are not yet strong enough on their legs so they don\'t follow their moms around, who are probably out grazing.

Stanko said the fawns will stay put in one location but their moms will return from time to time to nurse them. Even though these babies may be in someone\'s yard for an extended period of time, they will eventually leave with their mothers.

Just like with fawns, young rabbits in a nest don\'t need to be rescued either. But the mother rabbit will not return as long as a person is standing near the nest site. So just leave them alone and let the mother return on her own to care for the young.

Young birds are sometimes found on the ground near a nest. If this happens, just put the bird carefully back into the nest, according to the NJ Division of Fish and Wildlife website.

When young raccoons are found alone, it is likely they are exploring and their mother is nearby.

So what happens if you already picked up a baby wildlife animal? Stanko said put it back where you found it. All those wives\' tales about a human\'s scent being on the baby are not applicable.

"Odds are mom was off in the distance watching you anyway. They\'re usually not far from their fawns. So if you put it back, she will come back for it," Stanko said.

If a wildlife animal is visibly hurt or sick or maybe the mother is dead in a road nearby and it\'s clear the baby is abandoned, Stanko said help is needed. Be sure to visit the website at www.njfishandwildlife.com. On there is a list of licensed state wildlife rehabilitators licensed. She said these are the only in the state who are able to take care of wildlife legally.

In the meantime, Stanko if you see wildlife in your yard, just enjoy it.

"That\'s one of the beauties of New Jersey. We have such varied wildlife in the most densely populated states in the country. It\'s a wonder to see a fawn or baby fox in your yard. So enjoy it from a distance and respect it as the wild animals as they are," Stanko said.

Newest warehouse lawsuit involves builder’s plan to use Green Acres land

Opponents of a plan to build a 510,000-square-foot warehouse in Phillipsburg, are urging the Department of Environmental Protection to deny a request to lift an open-space protection so the site can be developed.The DEP has designated about 7.5 acres of a 43-acre parcel where the warehouse would be built as open space under its Green Acres program that preserves land and prevents development.The Phillipsburg Town Council, which changed its zoning in May to allow the development, is asking the DEP to remove the 7.5-acre lot from...

Opponents of a plan to build a 510,000-square-foot warehouse in Phillipsburg, are urging the Department of Environmental Protection to deny a request to lift an open-space protection so the site can be developed.

The DEP has designated about 7.5 acres of a 43-acre parcel where the warehouse would be built as open space under its Green Acres program that preserves land and prevents development.

The Phillipsburg Town Council, which changed its zoning in May to allow the development, is asking the DEP to remove the 7.5-acre lot from the Green Acres program, according to a lawsuit filed against the township by five residents who oppose the development.

The suit, filed in late June, says the parcel is listed under the town’s open-space inventory and may not be converted to other uses without the permission of the DEP.

Both the agency, and the mayor of Phillipsburg, Todd Tersigni, declined to comment on the pending litigation.

Tim Evans, director of research at the nonprofit New Jersey Future, and an expert on land use, said he was unaware that the DEP had ever removed a parcel of land from the Green Acres program.

A storm of criticism

Inclusion of a parcel in the program means it’s off the market unless the agency decides to sell it, Evans said. But selling it would risk a storm of criticism from taxpayers who have funded the Green Acres program since it started in 1961, he predicted.

“Even if DEP did do that, it would seem like it would be a violation of the public trust, since the public funded all those open-space initiatives back in the 2000s with the understanding that the lands acquired would remain undeveloped,” he said.

“It seems like DEP would have to conduct a big public-relations operation if it had a piece of land in the Green Acres program that it thought there was a compelling reason to now allow that land to be developed,” Evans said.

The possible removal of protection from land that would be developed for a warehouse represents a new source of contention as developers scramble for land where warehouses can be built to meet surging demand from e-commerce businesses.

100 warehouses planned for Garden State

More than 100 warehouses totaling 26.5 million square feet of rentable space are due to be built in New Jersey over the next three years, according to CoStar, an information service for the commercial real estate industry. In northern and central Jersey, 11.1 million square feet of warehouse space was leased in the first three months of 2021, the highest quarterly total for 20 years, according to Newmark, a commercial real estate firm.

The boom — dubbed warehouse “sprawl” by its critics — has spawned lawsuits by community groups who fear the giant buildings will choke roads with truck traffic, and eat up more of the state’s dwindling open space.

In the Phillipsburg suit, the residents argue the council’s zoning change is inconsistent with the town’s 2004 master plan, and with a 2013 plan to redevelop the riverfront along the Delaware River.

They say the warehouse plan is “utterly incompatible” with the town’s website description of itself as a place where people can escape “crowded, impersonal” developments, and instead join a “close-knit community of families and friends.”

The proposed warehouse with 491 truck-parking spaces will “dramatically increase truck traffic on the narrow and congested streets in the area around the Riverview Redevelopment Area, in direct contravention of the master plan and its objective of ‘eliminating truck-dependent uses from areas with no or limited access to the major highway network,’” the complaint says.

The development would also cause a big increase in impervious surface, and would build a large stormwater retention basin, which together would violate DEP stormwater management rules, it says.

Violation of due process

The plaintiffs say the council violated citizens’ due-process rights by not providing full copies of the ordinance before it was voted on; that the ordinance was inconsistent with the master plan; and that the riverfront property is owned by a developer whose principal is also a partner in a law firm that has worked for at least one member of the council.

It accuses the council of a conflict of interest and asks the state Superior Court in Warren County to overturn the ordinance.

The complaint also blasts a consultant’s report for the town council that concluded in February that the town’s plans to amend its riverfront development design were broadly consistent with both the original riverfront plan, and its master plan.

But the consultant, Van Cleef Engineering Associates, said the zoning change to light industrial use would increase truck traffic and “potentially” automobile use in an area that is trying to become more pedestrian-friendly.

The Highlands Coalition, whose area includes Phillipsburg, is not part of the lawsuit but is following it closely because public lands are under threat, said Elliott Ruga, the nonprofit’s head of policy and communications.

“We are firmly against a project that takes away the public’s use of public property and diverts it to private interests, and in this case what is particularly egregious is handing over a city’s prime amenity, riverfront property,” he said.

The group’s executive director, Julia Somers, said any decision to sell off Green Acres land would be made by the State House Commission, which controls the sale and lease of state-owned properties, and relies on the DEP’s Green Acres program to make recommendations, before ruling on whether to sell.

Somers said the proposed removal of the Phillipsburg parcel from Green Acres appears to be a “diversion” in which a property is not being used for the purpose for which it was purchased and preserved. A proposed “diversion” begins with a request from the affected town to the commission, and will usually require another parcel to be substituted for one being sold, she said.

But Micah Rasmussen, a Rider University professor who led a successful campaign against a warehouse project in Upper Freehold earlier this year, said the prospect of losing public open space to private development is alarming.

“Open space preservation has been among the most popular state investments of the last half century, but we can’t take for granted it will always be that way,” he said.

New warehouses in NJ would be required to have solar-ready roofs

New warehouses would be required to have roofs ready for solar power generating equipment once Gov. Phil Murphy signs a bill backed by the Legislature, the commercial real estate industry, and even some opponents of New Jersey’s current warehouse boom.The bill (A-3352) is designed to encourage more solar panels or thermal units on top of the vast warehouses springing up across the state. Supporters of solar see the trend as...

New warehouses would be required to have roofs ready for solar power generating equipment once Gov. Phil Murphy signs a bill backed by the Legislature, the commercial real estate industry, and even some opponents of New Jersey’s current warehouse boom.

The bill (A-3352) is designed to encourage more solar panels or thermal units on top of the vast warehouses springing up across the state. Supporters of solar see the trend as a golden opportunity for warehouse operators to reduce or eliminate their electricity bills and sell any excess power back to the grid. All solar power generated would also help the state reach Murphy’s goal of 100% clean energy by 2050.

The measure, which would apply to new warehouses of 100,000 square feet or more, was passed in early June by resounding margins of 46-24 in the Assembly and 25-13 in the Senate and will become effective as soon as Murphy signs it.

Assemblyman. James Kennedy (D-Middlesex), the bill’s lead sponsor, said he expected Murphy to sign it but didn’t know when that would happen. He said many lawmakers voted for this because the bill incentivizes emissions-free power and helps the state meet its clean-energy goals. If it becomes law, the measure would generate the energy without being a visual blot on the landscape.

It ‘makes a lot of sense’

“Doing solar on the roofs of these things makes a lot of sense,” Kennedy said. “It’s not invasive as it is in a landscape where you see these solar panels that are out of character for the area. They generate enough power to minimize the cost of electricity in the warehouse, and then the balance of it goes back to the grid, so it’s a win-win.

“There’s a cost to it but you get your money back. In some cases, you can have a $30,000 a month electric bill, and you suddenly don’t have one,” he said.

Mike McGuinness, chief executive of NAIOP New Jersey, a trade association for commercial real estate developers, said his group supports the bill, and noted that some of his members are already building solar-ready warehouses.

McGuinness said warehouses with solar-ready roofs are easier to lease than those without but even the latter kind “would not be a deal breaker” given the current strong demand for warehouse space in New Jersey. A solar roof comes with the infrastructure that allows the tenant to quickly install photovoltaic panels solar-thermal units.

Developers are already being pressed by solar companies and the New Jersey Board of Public Utilities to install solar on their warehouses, McGuinness said. The solar companies are generating revenue for themselves and the warehouse owners who may then be able to pass cost-savings on to tenants, he said. For the BPU’s part, it is encouraging solar generation in pursuit of New Jersey’s clean-energy goals.

Surge in e-commerce drives warehouse development

A surge in e-commerce is driving the scramble for warehouse space to store an avalanche of goods ordered online. Some new warehouses are built on previously undeveloped sites, prompting critics to warn of warehouse “sprawl.”

A survey by the commercial real estate firm Newmark found 11.1 million square feet of warehouse space were leased in northern and central New Jersey in the first quarter of 2021, the strongest growth for 20 years.

Micah Rasmussen, a Rider University professor who led a successful community campaign against a planned warehouse in Upper Freehold, Monmouth County earlier this year, said the bill doesn’t address concerns about sprawl or traffic congestion. But he said the prospect of solar-ready warehouses is more palatable than those that are not.

“A double use of undeveloped land is better than a single use,” he said. “This doesn’t mean every project should be approved simply because it’s solar-ready, but serving a public purpose like increasing our renewable energy production does help.”

If the bill becomes law, developers of solar-ready warehouses will start to argue that approvals should be less rigorous because the new buildings will also serve a public purpose, Rasmussen predicted.

“I wouldn’t go that far — these are not schools or hospitals, after all,” he said. “But for me, getting any public value from the development of undeveloped land is better than none.”

Jazz, ice cream, beer and a boat ride: 15 things to do in New Jersey this weekend

"Come on babe, why don\'t we paint the town? And all that jazz ... "No the musical "Chicago" is not coming to the Shore, but the nonprofit group Jazz Arts Project is presenting Jazz Week on the Plaza at Two River Theater in Red Bank.For 15 years, Jazz Arts Project held these concerts inside Two River\'s Marion Huber Theater. This summer, the concerts ar...

"Come on babe, why don\'t we paint the town? And all that jazz ... "

No the musical "Chicago" is not coming to the Shore, but the nonprofit group Jazz Arts Project is presenting Jazz Week on the Plaza at Two River Theater in Red Bank.

For 15 years, Jazz Arts Project held these concerts inside Two River\'s Marion Huber Theater. This summer, the concerts are taking place outdoors on the newly renovated plaza. The series begins tonight with pianist and vocalist Champian Fulton, a mainstay on the New York jazz scene.

On Friday it\'s vocalist Charenee Wade, who "evokes a classic jazz sound akin to Betty Carter and Sarah Vaughan," according to a mini biography on the Jazz Arts Project site.

Saturday it\'s "The two and only” — musicians Aaron Weinstein (called "the \'Groucho\' of the violin") and Matt Munisteri, referred to as an "urban banjo warrior."

Sunday it\'s musician Warren Vaché, a jazz veteran who has performed and recorded with Benny Goodman and Rosemary Clooney.

Shows begin at 7 p.m., and limited tickets are available for tables of two ($60) or four ($120). Each evening will run about 75 minutes.

Stone Pony in Asbury Park:Concert season heating up in July, see who\'s playing

Bob Polding at the Wonder Bar

What\'s new with the Bob Polding Band?

Find out at 8 p.m. Saturday as the Polding and crew come through the Wonder Bar in Asbury Park. They\'ll be previewing some new stuff in two sets.

“We’ll be playing a lot of new material from our upcoming 12-song release,” Polding said.

That sounds like a new album. Stop by for Polding\'s Americana rock and country excursions. If you can\'t place the name, chances are you\'ve heard them on WFAN.

Tickets are $17 in advance, $20 at the door.

Music in Bradley Beach

Jersey jam band Desert Jellies will play from 7 to 9 p.m. Saturday at Bradley Beach\'s Riley Park. The show is part of the free Saturdays in the Park concert series, which runs through Aug 28. The band\'s latest album is "Dried Out," which was released in August 2020.

All shows in the concert series are weather permitting. The park is located near the train station. More information, including a complete schedule, is at visitbradleybeach.com/event-calendar.

Big summer concerts are coming back:See who\'s playing in New Jersey, NYC and Philadelphia

Did someone say ice cream?

Using recipes from the 19th century, you and your family can help make (and eat!) ice cream in the shade of the ice house at Historic Walnford House, 62 Walnford Road in Upper Freehold.

The fun starts at 2 p.m. Saturday. The event is part of Monmouth County Park System\'s Edible History Series at Historic Walnford.

More information is available by calling 609-259-6275 or by visiting monmouthcountyparks.com/eventcalendar.aspx.

Theater in Middletown

The Middletown Arts Center, in collaboration with Dunbar Repertory Company, will present "Shakin’ the Mess Outta Misery," which features a young Black girl\'s coming of age in the 1960s South.

The show is written by Shay Youngblood and directed by Darrell Lawrence Willis Sr.

It features Tracie Ashe (Tinton Falls), Sequoia Tellashia Davis (Ocean Township), Mimi B. Francis (North Brunswick), Natalie Hayes (Long Branch), Brianna Kelly (Matawan), Qualé Lewis (Asbury Park), Cheryl Monden (Lakewood), Lorraine Stone (Eatontown) and DaNeen Wyche (Neptune).

It runs July 9 to 11 and 16 to 18 at the MAC, 36 Church St., Middletown. Friday and Saturday performances are at 8 p.m., with Sunday performances at 4 p.m.

For tickets, $20, visit middletownarts.org or call the MAC Box Office at 732-706-4100.

Dunbar Repertory Company calls itself “Monmouth County’s African American Theater Company” and says it is committed to perpetuating an appreciation of cultural diversity and celebrating African American culture through live, literary readings, main stage theatrical productions, education programs and services.

Vegan eats in Neptune

Michelle Mancuso opened Cats Luck Vegan, 140 Steiner Ave. in Neptune City, two weeks ago and has been busy serving a varied menu of breakfast and lunch items. Everything is vegan, from the buttermilk biscuits with country gravy to the Rueben on rye. For those with a sweet tooth, good news: Mancuso has been baking for years and offers hand pies, brownies, cinnamon rolls and more. But act fast, as she bakes in small batches and the goodies often run out.

Raise a can for Icarus Brewing

Icarus Brewing, which has quickly become a powerhouse in the New Jersey craft beer scene in recent years, is celebrating its four-year Canniversary on Saturday at its Lakewood tasting room.

There will be special releases, commemorative merchandise and more from noon to 10 p.m. at Icarus, 1790 Swathmore Ave. Check out our feature on the brewery and its Canniversary for all of the details.

Take a boat tour

Tuckerton Seaport is known as a place to learn about southern Ocean County\'s maritime history, but it\'s also a great spot for a boat ride.

The seaport, which sits along Tuckerton Creek, has several choices for those looking to spend time on the water. There are private, 50-minute narrated creek tours ($40 to reserve the entire boat, up to 10 passengers); ferry rides that depart both from the seaport and the Beach Haven public dock on Taylor Avenue on Long Beach Island ($12.50 per person, roundtrip); sunset cruises ($15 per person); and private charters aboard a 33-foot sloop, the Whitecap.

Tuckerton Seaport, 120 W. Main St., also is home to the Baymen\'s Museum, a lighthouse, gift shop, boardwalk and nature trail, plus The Union Market, a coffee shop.

More information is at 609-296-8868 or tuckertonseaport.org.

And if you want the weekend to continue ...

Turf Club music

The Turf Club at 1200 Springwood Ave. in Asbury Park is the last of the great Springwood Avenue clubs on the West Side of the city that still stands. Lenny Welch, the Broadways, Clarence Clemons before he joined the E Street Band, and more played the spot back in the day.

Now, music returns after decades of silence when the Asbury Park African-American Music Project hosts "Tuesday at the Turf." It\'s a benefit show as they are renovating the spot to make it once again a place of music and expression.

Tickets are $10 and the event runs from 6 to 8 p.m.

Alex Biese, Sarah Griesemer, Chris Jordan and Ilana Keller contributed to this story.

All The July Events In Monmouth County Parks

So much going on in Monmouth County Parks this July! We\'ve got the full round-up:MIDDLETOWN, NJ — July is Parks & Recreation month and the Monmouth County Park System is filling it with family-friendly activities for county residents to enjoy. Here\'s what is planned:Enviro-QuestThursday, July 1 at 11 a.m.Dorbrook Recreation Area, Colts Neck - Meet in the basketball court parking lot.Thursday, July 8 at 11 a.m.Tatum Park, Middletown - Meet in the Red Hill Activity Center...

So much going on in Monmouth County Parks this July! We\'ve got the full round-up:

MIDDLETOWN, NJ — July is Parks & Recreation month and the Monmouth County Park System is filling it with family-friendly activities for county residents to enjoy. Here\'s what is planned:

Enviro-Quest

Thursday, July 1 at 11 a.m.

Dorbrook Recreation Area, Colts Neck - Meet in the basketball court parking lot.

Thursday, July 8 at 11 a.m.

Tatum Park, Middletown - Meet in the Red Hill Activity Center parking lot.

Thursday, July 15 at 11 a.m.

Huber Woods Park, Middletown - Meet in the Environmental Center parking lot.

Thursday, July 22 at 11 a.m.

Shark River Park, Wall - Meet in the Shelter Building parking lot.

Thursday, July 29 at 11 a.m.

Big Brook Park, Marlboro - Meet in the dock parking lot.

Don\'t know what to do on a weekday this summer break? Why not seek out some nature fun? Follow the Enviro-Quest signs to where the Park System Naturalist is waiting. Once you are there you can join in on a mini-nature lesson, activity, or walk for 30-60 minutes of nature-based fun. Open to all ages; under 18 with adult. FREE!

Seining Along Sandy Hook Bay

Mondays, Wednesdays, & Fridays, July 2-30 from 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Bayshore Waterfront Park, Port Monmouth

Join us for this hands-on nature program and discover a variety of fish, crabs, and other sea creatures as we pull a long seine net along the edge of Sandy Hook Bay. Closed-toe shoes are required. Meet on the beach near the parking lot. Parents or guardians are required to stay with and supervise their children. No swimming during the event. This program is designed for individuals and families. Weather permitting. FREE!

Boat Tours of the Manasquan Reservoir

Friday, July 2 at 6 p.m. & 7 p.m.

Saturdays & Sundays, July 3 & 4, 10 & 11, 17 & 18 and 24 & 25 at 2 p.m., 3 p.m., 4 p.m. & 5 p.m.

Wednesdays, July 7, 14, 21 & 28 at 2 p.m., 3 p.m. & 4 p.m.

Manasquan Reservoir, Howell

These 45-minute tours are narrated by Park System Naturalists and include opportunities to view local wildlife. The cost is $6 per adult and $4 per child, age 12 and under. Please call to confirm schedule as tours are both weather and water level dependent. All tours leave from the Visitor Center. Life-jackets required. Tickets can be purchased on day of tour only.

Historic Battery Lewis Tours

Saturdays, July 3, 10, 17, 24 & 31 from 10 a.m.-4 p.m.

Sundays, July 4, 11, 18 & 25 from 1-3 p.m.

Hartshorne Woods Park, Highlands – Rocky Point section

Tour the restored Historic Battery Lewis and learn about the history of this important former coastal defense site. FREE!

Yarn Bee

Saturday, July 3 from 12-2:30 p.m.

Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel

Whether just starting a new hobby or working on an old project, all are welcome to this gathering! The relaxed atmosphere means no pressure - you can knit or crochet at your own pace, and farm staff will be on hand to assist those needing a little extra help. Bring your own supplies. Open to ages 10 and up; under 18 with adult. The cost is $5 per person; cash or check only.

Mill Demonstration

Saturdays & Sundays, July 3 & 4, 10 & 11, 17 &18, 24 & 25 and 31 from 1-4 p.m.

Historic Walnford, Upper Freehold

See the 19th century gristmill in action. FREE!

Independence Day Celebration

Sunday, July 4 from 12-3 p.m.

Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel

Join the farm staff as they celebrate the holiday with music and games. FREE!

Tidal Tuesdays – Seine the Cove

Tuesdays, July 6, 13, 20 & 27 from 11 a.m.-12 p.m.

Fisherman\'s Cove Conservation Area, Manasquan

Discover a variety of fish, crabs and other sea creatures that may be found along the cove during this seining program. Closed-toe shoes are required. Parents or guardians are required to stay with and supervise their children. No swimming during the event. Weather permitting. FREE!

Thompson Park Canoe Rentals

Saturdays & Sundays, July 10 & 11 and 24 & 25 from 10 a.m.-3 p.m.

Thompson Park, Lincroft

Canoes will be available for rent on Marlu Lake. All equipment provided; limited number of canoes available. Open to ages 3 and up, under 18 with adult. All rentals must be returned by 3 p.m. The cost is $15 per boat for 1-3 people for two hours; cash or check only.

Edible History Series: Ice Cream

Saturday, July 10 from 2-3 p.m.

Historic Walnford, Upper Freehold

Using recipes from the 19th century, help crank ice cream in the shade of the ice house, and then consume the results of our labor. FREE!

Wheat Harvest and Threshing Demonstration

Saturday & Sunday, July 10 & 11 from 12-2 p.m.

Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel

See the farm staff harvest and thresh this year\'s wheat crop. Learn how this important crop was cultivated and processed in the days before modern combines. On Saturday, the wheat will be cut, gathered and bundled into sheathes using a horse-drawn grain binder. On Sunday, the staff will use a 19th century, belt-driven Champion thresher to separate the wheat grain from the straw and the chaff. FREE!

Casual Birder

Tuesday, July 13 at 9 a.m.

Crosswicks Creek Park, Upper Freehold - Meet in the Polhemustown Road parking lot.

Tuesday, July 27 at 9 a.m.

Huber Woods Park, Middletown - Meet in the Environmental Center parking lot.

Join a Park System Naturalist for a laid-back morning bird walk and meander through the park for about an hour and a half to see what birds we can find. No need to be an expert at identifying birds to enjoy. A limited number of binoculars will be available to borrow if needed. Open to ages 11 and up; under 18 with adult. FREE!

Drop-In Nature Kayak Tours

Tuesday, July 13 from 12:30-1:30 p.m.

Wednesday, July 14 from 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 15 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Friday, July 16 from 3:30-4:30 p.m.

Wednesday, July 28 from 1:30-2:30 p.m.

Thursday, July 29 from 2:30-3:30 p.m.

Friday, July 30 from 3-4 p.m.

Swimming River Park, Red Bank

Explore the beauty and nature of the Swimming River during this tour. Novice paddlers welcome. All equipment is provided. Both single and tandem kayaks are available for use on a first come, first served basis. The program is limited to only 12 participants. Wear appropriate clothing that can get wet. Weight limit 250 lbs. for singles; 450 lbs. for tandems. Open to ages 12 and up; under 18 with participating adult. The cost is $25 per person; cash or check only.

Nature Lecture Series: Sharks of New Jersey

Thursday, July 15 from 7-8 p.m.

Bayshore Waterfront Park Activity Center, Port Monmouth

Join a Park System Naturalist for this talk on sharks. Discover why sharks are important to protect, why they are unique, and what threatens them. Plus, we\'ll take a closer look at some species commonly found along the Jersey Shore, including great whites. FREE!

Accordion Melodies of the 1890s

Saturday, July 17 from 1-3 p.m.

Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel

Hear melodies of the 1890s played on the accordion. FREE!

19th Century Woodworking Demonstration

Saturday, July 17 from 12-3 p.m.

Historic Longstreet Farm, Holmdel

See how the carpenter uses 19th century woodworking and carving tools during this demonstration. FREE!

Open Shoot Archery

Saturday, July 17 from 10 a.m.-2 p.m.

Thompson Park Activity Barn, Lincroft

All equipment is provided for this open shoot. No outside equipment permitted. This is not an instructional clinic and NOT designed for beginners. If you are new to archery, register for one of our instructional classes prior to attending. Open to ages 10 and up; under 18 with adult. The cost is $10 per person; cash or check only.

Monmouth County Fair

Wednesday-Friday, July 21-23 from 4-11 p.m.

Saturday, July 24 from 11 a.m.-11 p.m.

Sunday, July 25 from 11 a.m.-6 p.m.

East Freehold Showgrounds, Freehold

This annual tradition includes 4-H live animal exhibits, amusement rides, entertainment, home and garden competitions, opening night fireworks (weather permitting), and more. Admission is $8 per person; age 17 & under enter free.

To learn more about these Park System activities, please visit www.MonmouthCountyParks.com or call the Park System at 732-842-4000. For persons with hearing impairment, the Park System TTY/TDD number is 711. The Monmouth County Park System, created in 1960 by the Monmouth County Board of County Commissioners, is Monmouth County\'s Open Space, Parks and Recreation agency.

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