Basement Waterproofing in Toms River

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Toms River, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

Our clients trust us because we are honest, hardworking, and efficient with every job we perform. We understand that no two basement waterproofing jobs are the same, which is why we will never give you a quote using a “cookie-cutter” approach.

Basement Waterproofing in Toms River

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Toms River:

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

Which Waterproofing Solution is Right for Me?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Get it Done Right, the First Time

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

 If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Latest News in Toms River

Cristian Soto gives Central baseball a wild and crazy OCT championship

TOMS RIVER – Cristian Soto is soft spoken, but his performance at Toms River High School North’s Ryan Field spoke loudly in the Ocean County Tournament championship game. An extremely talented freshman catcher for Central Regional, Soto handled about 200 pitches thrown by pitcher Cam Leiter and Connor Shea Wednesday night. He blocked numerous pitches in the dirt and went 5-for-6 with a walk, reached base all seven times he was up and delivered the game-winning single to left with two out and the bases loaded in the bottom of th…

TOMS RIVER – Cristian Soto is soft spoken, but his performance at Toms River High School North’s Ryan Field spoke loudly in the Ocean County Tournament championship game.

An extremely talented freshman catcher for Central Regional, Soto handled about 200 pitches thrown by pitcher Cam Leiter and Connor Shea Wednesday night.

He blocked numerous pitches in the dirt and went 5-for-6 with a walk, reached base all seven times he was up and delivered the game-winning single to left with two out and the bases loaded in the bottom of the 13th inning to give Central a wild and improbable 7-6 win over Brick Memorial.

Soto also had the game-tying RBI single with two out in the bottom of the 12th.

"You just have to fight on,” Soto said. "In the moment, your legs are tired and you’re cramping. You just have to stay in there and do it. It’s just in the moment.

4 hours, 400 pitches, 33 strikeouts

Soto’s hit gave Central (19-9) its first OCT title since 2014 and its seventh overall. Five of its county championships came under late, legendary head coach Al Kunzman, who was one of the driving forces behind the beginning of the tournament in 1972. The tournament championship plaque is named for Kunzman.

It is likely none of the Golden Eagles’ previous OCT championship game wins were as crazy and improbable as this one.

Central wiped out deficits of 3-0 in the third inning, 5-3 in the 11th and 6-5 in the 12th.

The game lasted four hours. There were over 400 pitches thrown. The teams combined for 33 strikeouts and there were several base running and mental errors.

It will be an OCT final that will be talked about forever when the great games in the history of the tournament are discussed.

"I’ve been around the game a long time, I’ve never seen anything like that,” Central coach Jerry Frulio said while holding the Al Kunzman Championship Plaque. "I have no words for it. It’s surreal. It’s a roller-coaster. It’s emotional for me because of the name on this trophy. We’re bringing it back where it belongs.”

Soto personified the up-and-down ride of the game because he also made a mental mistake when he did not throw to first base on what would have been an inning-ending strikeout in the fifth.

Leiter made sure Central did not pay for that, though, when he picked a runner off third with the bases-loaded to end that inning before another pitch was thrown.

Soto is ‘everything we’d hope’ as a freshman catcher

However, Soto blocked several pitches in the dirt that would have resulted in run-scoring wild pitches.

"Cristian has had a phenomenal year as a defensive catcher,” Frulio said. "He blocks everything. He makes freshman mistakes, but he’s not once all year been overmatched at the plate. He’s not been overwhelmed by any situation he’s come across this year. He has been everything we’d hope he would be as a freshman catcher.”

Soto got the chance to deliver the game-winner after Central loaded the bases with nobody out in the 13th on a bloop single to left by Shane Sajewicz, a single to left by Trevor Coltenbeck and a walk to Leiter.

It looked like Brick Memorial (17-12) was going to get out of the inning when Brandon Hulsart struck out the next two batters.

However, those were the last two hitters, Hulsart, who came into the game in relief of starter Cole Manfro with one out in the seventh, would face because he reached the 110-pitch limit a pitcher can throw in one day under the NJSIAA’s pitching rule.

Soto then lined an 0-1 pitch from Brady Leach down the third base line to score Sajewicz and set off a wild celebration among the Central players, coaches and fans.

"Every single at-bat (Wednesday night), they threw me a curve ball first pitch,” Soto said. "I took it first pitch. Then, he threw me another one and I hit it to left field.”

"I felt good about him being up at the plate,” Frulio, a former Central standout himself, said. "Bases loaded nobody out and you get two strikeouts, and all of the sudden here comes Cristian Soto. All I could think of was I was glad I had him in the lineup at that point. He’s bounced around between the 6-7 hole. It works out sometimes. I think Al Kunzman was up there guiding my pen when I was writing the lineup.”

Soto’s game-tying hit came with Leiter on third as he lashed a line drive to center.

"He’s beyond his years in terms of ability and maturity,” Frulio said. "He’s going to get better. He’s going to get bigger. He’s going to get stronger. He’s going to learn more and more every time he goes out. He plays for an amazing travel organization. He plays for the New Jersey Marlins. They basically gave him to me on a silver platter. It’s a nice, comforting thing as a coach.”

Brick Memorial, which was trying to win the OCT for the first time since 1996, twice looked like it had the game won in extra innings.

Both times, senior second baseman Joe Giola was primed to be the hero. His go-ahead RBI double put the Mustangs ahead 4-3 in the 11th. That was followed by a run-scoring single by Manfro.

However, a two-run double to left center by sophomore shortstop Dom Masino tied it 5-5 in the bottom of the 11th.

‘Next guy up gets on, something happens’

Gioia’s one-out RBI single to left in the 12th gave Brick Memorial a 6-5 lead and set the stage for Soto’s heroics.

"There were a couple of times where you could feel myself deflate a little bit,” Frulio said. "But, all it would take is the next guy up. Next guy up gets on, something happens and all of the sudden you perk up.

"They’ve been doing that some sort of thing all year. I don’t know how I don’t have heart problems. Maybe I do and I’m not even realizing it. At some point, I’m going to have to go into our game changer (mobile scorebook) and look at how many games we’ve been behind and come back and won the game. The fact you’re behind is you just never have it in you to give up; says a lot about this group.”

Lost in the shuffle of the extra inning heroics were some outstanding pitching performances.

Leiter, the nephew of former Central greats and Major League pitchers Al and Mark Leiter and with Al Leiter in attendance, struck out 12 in 7 1/3 innings before he reached the pitch limit.

Manfro struck out eight in 6 1/3 innings before he reached the pitch limit and also went 5-for-7 with two RBI.

Hulsart struck out eight in 6 1/3 innings, including Evan Agrapides, who is Central’s school single-season record holder for hits with 45, twice.

Central reliever Connor Shea struck out five in his 5 2/3 innings and picked up the win.

"It was a crazy game. There was some crazy stuff that went on, but in the end, all that really anybody cares about is what the scoreboard says,” Frulio said.

Baseball: Central Regional beats Brick Memorial in wild, 13-inning Ocean County final

With two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the 13th inning, Central Regional freshman Cristian Soto came to the plate, looking to put an end to the back-and-forth marathon that had been the championship round of the Ocean County Tournament. Soto, who already had four hits on the day, provided another clutch moment when his team needed it most, hitting a walk-off single to left field to bring home the runner from third and give second-seeded Central Regional the victory over fourth-seeded Brick Memorial, 7-6, at Toms River Nor…

With two outs and the bases loaded in the bottom of the 13th inning, Central Regional freshman Cristian Soto came to the plate, looking to put an end to the back-and-forth marathon that had been the championship round of the Ocean County Tournament.

Soto, who already had four hits on the day, provided another clutch moment when his team needed it most, hitting a walk-off single to left field to bring home the runner from third and give second-seeded Central Regional the victory over fourth-seeded Brick Memorial, 7-6, at Toms River North.

“I just knew I had to come in clutch,” said Soto on his game-winning single. “I had to do something there. I had five hits out of six at-bats, so I was confident.”

In addition to his stellar hitting display, Soto also had an impressive night behind the plate, catching the entire game while making several athletic blocks to prevent potential passed balls.

“It’s almost impossible,” said Central Regional head coach Jerry Frulio on how rare it is to find a freshman that is so refined on both offense and defense. “You never see it. It’s out there, but I’ve never seen it like that.”

“He’s beyond his years in terms of ability and maturity.”

Winning a county tournament is always an exciting experience, but to do so while having to make several comebacks makes it even more thrilling.

“The whole season was like that,” said Soto on his team’s comeback ability. “We’ve had games where we were down five and still came back.”

Twice in extra innings, it seemed that Brick Memorial was on its way to victory, first when it scored two runs in the top of the 11th and then again when it scored one in the top of the 12th. On both occasions, Central Regional managed to rally with its back against the wall before eventually securing the win.

“I don’t know how long I’ve been around the game,” said Coach Frulio on the improbable come-from-behind victory. “I’ve never seen anything like that. I have no words for it. It’s surreal.”

Central Regional (19-9) had a chance to end the game in the 10th inning, getting each of its first two batters on base before a double play and a flyout put an end to the potential rally. Brick Memorial carried that momentum into the 11th, scoring two runs on a pair of hits from seniors Cole Manfro and Joe Gioia.

The Eagles bounced right back in the bottom half of the frame, with freshman Dom Masino hitting a two-run double to get things back to even.

“They’ve been doing that sort of thing all year,” said Frulio on his team’s late-game heroics. “It’s been uncanny. I don’t know how I don’t have heart problems. Maybe I do and I’m not even realizing it.”

Gioia got another clutch hit in the top of the 12th for Brick Memorial (17-12), driving in a run with a single to left before Central Regional found some more extra-inning magic in the form of a Soto RBI single to even things up, almost securing the win as sophomore Chase Pierce lined out to second with two outs and the bases loaded.

“It was a crazy game,” said Frulio, referencing several interactions between the dugouts and with the umpire, including the ejection of his team’s starting centerfielder and leadoff hitter. “But in the end, I guess all that really anybody cares about is what the scoreboard says.”

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Junior Cam Leiter put together a solid outing on the mound for Central Regional, pitching 7 and 1/3 innings with 12 strikeouts before reaching his pitch limit, allowing an earned run and two unearned in a no-decision.

“Cam shows dominant, like absolute dominant traits on the mound,” said Frulio on his standout pitcher. “They squared him up a couple times, to their credit, but he put us in a position to win the game.”

“We sit on the bench with the coaches and say ‘what’s he going to do next year?’”

Leiter’s counterpart, Brick Memorial starting pitcher Cole Manfro, also put together an impressive line on the bump, striking out nine over 6 and 1/3 innings, capped by an eight-pitch strikeout to the final batter he faced.

Connor Shea earned the victory on the mound for Central Regional, maintaining his composure despite allowing several extra-inning runs and refusing to allow the game to get out of hand.

The championship represents the seventh in Ocean County title in program history for Central Regional, which most recently won the tournament in 2014.

The championship victory is made even sweeter for Frulio, who was a star outfielder for the team from 1988-1990 and suffered a memorable defeat at the hands of Brick Memorial.

“In 1990, my senior year in high school, we lost in the Ocean County championship to them in extra innings,” said Frulio. “And all of my buddies that I grew up with, that I graduated high school with, this is for them. This is for 1990.”

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Central bounces back from SJ final loss, rolls to Ocean County softball title

Once their dreams of winning a sectional title in their final season ended in heartbreaking fashion with a 1-0 loss to Hammonton in the South Jersey Group 3 final Saturday, the Central Regional High School softball seniors turned their attention to a different piece of hardware. Still alive in the Ocean County Tournament, second-seeded Central rolled over sixth-seeded Toms River East, 12-2, in Monday’s semifinal and captured the tournament title with a 13-0 victory over eighth-seeded Toms River North in Wednesday night’s f…

Once their dreams of winning a sectional title in their final season ended in heartbreaking fashion with a 1-0 loss to Hammonton in the South Jersey Group 3 final Saturday, the Central Regional High School softball seniors turned their attention to a different piece of hardware.

Still alive in the Ocean County Tournament, second-seeded Central rolled over sixth-seeded Toms River East, 12-2, in Monday’s semifinal and captured the tournament title with a 13-0 victory over eighth-seeded Toms River North in Wednesday night’s final at Toms River South.

“We’ve been all together since we were five years old,” said finals MVP Hannah Costa, who pitched a three-hit, five-inning shutout and reached base all four times. “I’m just happy it ended it with a championship. I think we used (the sectional title loss) as fire. We played so hard in that game. We were sad we lost, but we knew we had this and our season wasn’t over and we just kept battling.”

Not surprisingly, the Central seniors were emotional after the game – sad it was over and happy it ended the way it did.

“It’s our official ending of all of us being together,” said senior shortstop Ava Cino, who finished the year with 53 hits and 49 RBis.

Toms River North had a Cinderella run to the final, upsetting top-seeded Southern and rallying from six runs down in the fifth inning to rally past Jackson Liberty in extra innings in the semifinal.

But the Cinderella story hit midnight shortly after the 7 p.m. start as Central sent 12 runners to the plate in the bottom of the first and scored eight runs. Senior Brittany Gable’s RBI double that just missed leaving the yard capped the rally, which also include sophomore Kelsey Lowden’s two-run single and a two-run triple from another sophomore in Payton Koenig.

“That’s the Central way,” said Cino. “We say (score) early and often all the time. All nine of us can hit and we use that to our advantage.”

Toms River North should have been out of the inning with a couple runs in but committed two errors and was shaky on some other plays.

The first five batters in the Central order are all seniors, In addition to Cino, Gable and Costa, Samantha Rullo and Cassidy Krill played their final game.

The five seniors were a combined 8-for-14 with six walks, nine runs scored and five RBIs in the championship game.

“I knew all year long they had great character, they never gave up in any game, at any point,” said Central coach Steve Stout. “We teach them win each pitch, each at-bat and each inning and they proved it all along. This is good for our community, for girls sports and for our school. To bring the trophy home shows a lot for these girls, especially the seniors.

“It’s senior leadership. When they come back as seniors, they play like different players and after not having a season last year, they came hungry, they came ready to play. I’m proud of the way they led this year and proud they came out with a championship. I was blessed this year.”

Costa admitted after not having a junior year because of the COVID-19 pandemic when Central would have been a contender, she savored all the moments in this 23-5 season.

“Not having a season last year made this year extra special for us,” said Costa. “We all just wanted to come together and get it done.”

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Midyear tests point to education ‘state of emergency’ in NJ

TRENTON – Some state education officials are sounding the alarm after midyear assessments showed three of every eight New Jersey public school students scored below grade level in math and English language arts. The coronavirus pandemic upended education, pushing classes online at all schools for three months last spring and still continuing more than a year later at a handful of schools. It also messed with New Jersey’s statewide standardized tests, which were canceled both last and this school year. All students w…

TRENTON – Some state education officials are sounding the alarm after midyear assessments showed three of every eight New Jersey public school students scored below grade level in math and English language arts.

The coronavirus pandemic upended education, pushing classes online at all schools for three months last spring and still continuing more than a year later at a handful of schools. It also messed with New Jersey’s statewide standardized tests, which were canceled both last and this school year.

All students will take a new ‘Start Strong’ assessment when they return next fall. Districts were also directed to administer locally selected assessments this past winter and report results to the state, and the results underscore the challenges posed by the pandemic:

The results can’t be compared with the typical standardized tests but show a similar socioeconomic pattern, with Black and Hispanic students twice as likely to score below grade level than white and Asian students. English learners, economically disadvantaged and disabled students also struggled.

“In addition to what we consider concerning percentages of students who are below grade level at the midyear point, we’re also noting the continued and alarming disproportionate equity gaps between our white students and students of color,” said Assistant Education Commissioner Lisa Gleason, who heads the Division of Academics and Performance.

“I am concerned, certainly, with the findings for those most vulnerable students that we have, and I’m looking forward to hearing other examples and ways that we can provide support – not just through federal funding but what we can do from the department side,” said Kathy Goldenberg, the State Board of Education president.

“We are really in a state of emergency in New Jersey when it comes to our kids and our education,” said Andrew Mulvihill, the board’s vice president. “This pandemic and keeping the kids out of school and remote learning seems to have done tremendous damage to our children and their amount of learning that has gone on.”

“We have to recognize that we’ve been dealt a blow, and we all have to work very, very hard to recover from this,” he said. “And I think we’re going to have to be very, very careful about how we spend this federal money that’s coming. I know it’s not up to the state’s control. It’s going to be the districts. But we really want to make sure we keep an eye on the ball.”

Acting Education Commissioner Angelica Allen-McMillan said in-person education matters and that districts and teachers worked hard to return to school, either fully or hybrid. But, she said, health and safety come first.

“We know that while it’s not ideal and while we believe that students learn best in schools, we also have expanded the ability to provide quality remote instruction,” Allen-McMillan said.

“It has not been a drain for everyone. It has not been a failure for everyone,” she said. “And to the contrary, we have heard over the course of the last six months in particular of many who have shared opportunities of success.”

The youngest elementary school students generally fared better than those in older elementary and middle-school grades. Gleason noted that the youngest students are the least independent in a remote learning setting, unfamiliar with the technology and reliant on parents and others to be their teacher’s partner.

“We want to commend our parents and caregivers because we believe that without the incredible support that they provided during this time, especially during remote learning, that this data would have been even more abysmal,” Gleason said.

Insider NJ’s Morning Intelligence Briefing: 6/18/2021

QUOTE OF THE DAY: “It makes us work. It makes us think. It makes us find better ways. It demands discussion. Politics is never pure. It never was, it never will be. Compromise makes politics better.” – Assemblyman Gary Schaer The statewide cumulative COVID-19 count stands at 890,878 cases and 23,674 fatalities (and 129,689 probable cases and 2,690 probabl…

QUOTE OF THE DAY: It makes us work. It makes us think. It makes us find better ways. It demands discussion. Politics is never pure. It never was, it never will be. Compromise makes politics better.” – Assemblyman Gary Schaer

The statewide cumulative COVID-19 count stands at 890,878 cases and 23,674 fatalities (and 129,689 probable cases and 2,690 probable fatalities) as of Thursday (an increase of 195 confirmed cases, 64 probable cases, and 7 lab-confirmed fatalities from the previous day). The viral transmission rate is .91. There have been 9,676,791 COVID-19 vaccinations administered (with 4,649,450 people fully vaccinated).

The state’s jobs rebound sped up in May, according to NJ Biz.

Camden County announced the second round of renters assistance, according to the Courier Post.

Mercer County granted today off for county employees in observance of Juneteenth.

ICYMI: Murphy touted the state’s COVID-19 vaccination rate; Murphy signed executive order ending the utility shutoff moratorium; Duch appointed Bergen administrator; Hicks resigning; poll shows Murphy’s clear path to re-election; Murphy’s once-skyrocketing ratings returned to pre-pandemic levels

Essex County Democratic Chairman LeRoy Jones was sworn-in as Chairman of the NJ State Democratic Party last night, succeeding John Currie. The NJDSC released a video tribute to Currie. As the Currie era ends, the Jones era begins, as the party organization enters its next stage.

The NJDSC filed a ELEC complaint against the Ciattarelli campaign.

21 GOP leaders endorsed Robert Bengivenga for Middlesex County GOP Chair.

Monmouth County Commissioner Kiley called on Democratic candidate Mike Beson to resign from the commissioner race due to an upcoming unpaid appointment, according to TAPinto.

ICYMI: NJDSC announced appointments to Redistricting Commission; NJ AFL-CIO endorsed candidates; Ali touted county party line; Candace Straight passed away; Ciattarelli announced his support Hugin for NJGOP Chair; Insider NJ’s Who’s Up And Who’s Down; Insider NJ’s Primary Day 2021 War Room; atmosphere of apathy among voters; DeCroce reflects on her primary loss, attributing her defeat in contentious race to number of factors; Ciattarelli emerged victorious and set forth general election theme, Murphy says he knows he’s in for tough battle; Trump became a relevant factor GOP primary; in LD20, Cryan defeated Holley; in battleground LD37, Johnson defeated Huttle; Middlesex v Camden for domination

Assemblyman Schaer discusses his lead poisoning elimination legislation, saying its the ‘most important bill I’ve ever written’.

Senator Sarlo says aid for undocumented immigrants is ‘not in the budget process‘, and hopes to have a budget bill introduced by Monday, according to Politico NJ.

Senator Scutari rebuffed Senator Weinberg’s allegation that he said many domestic violence complaints are ‘made up’, saying he ‘doesn’t know what she is talking about’, according to NJ.com.

‘Free The Grapes’ expressed support for eliminating capacity caps on direct winery shipments.

ICYMI: Governor Murphy took action on legislation; Porzio welcomed Lubot and Huch to its team; Murphy signed legislation enabling end of COVID emergency; Sellinger leading US Attorney candidate (iLine post); pressure building on Murphy to drop student mask requirement; Coughlin postponed public health emergency vote; Codey’s Insider NJ interview

The most consequential decision of NJDSC Chairman John Currie’s 8-year tenure as state party chair.

Senator Weinberg reflects on her nearly 30-year career in the Legislature with Steve Adubato.

AROUND THE WEB:

John Reitmeyer, NJ Spotlight

We asked NJ lawmakers if they got the COVID vaccine. Here’s what they said

Stacey Barchenger and Terrence T. McDonald, Trenton Bureau

AFL-CIO’s bipartisan tradition frays in chase for endorsements I Movers and Shakers

Charles Stile, NorthJersey.com

N.J. wants to protect women on the campaign trail, but sexual harassment bill is mired in politics, critics say

Susan K. Livio and Kelly Heyboer, NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

Paterson paying $150,000 to settle public works employee’s sexual harassment lawsuit

Jayed Rahman, Paterson Times

Another school bond referendum on the horizon for Princeton voters?

Krystal Knapp, Planet Princeton

Divided Toms River Regional board fails to appoint new superintendent

Jean Mikle, Asbury Park Press

Rowdy visitors to Toms River’s Snug Harbor pool are making neighbors miserable

Jean Mikle, Asbury Park Press

Lakewood school funding decision delayed by state for at least a month

Joe Strupp, Asbury Park Press

In pandemic school year, special education gets renewed scrutiny

John Mooney, NJ Spotlight

Some towns keep saying no to Pride flags. Do their arguments hold up?

Katie Sobko, NorthJersey.com

Murphy criticizes school district that removed holiday names from school calendar

Matt Arco, NJ Advance Media for NJ.com

McKoy: Juneteenth is nice — but the ask is so much more

Tom Bergeron.roi-nj.com

Mystery barge offshore in Ventnor is trying to fix a big problem

Amy S. Rosenberg, Philadelphia Inquirer

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