BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Tinton Falls

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Tinton Falls, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Tinton Falls, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Tinton Falls, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Tinton Falls, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Tinton Falls, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Tinton Falls, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Tinton Falls

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Tinton Falls:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Tinton Falls, NJ

Latest News in Tinton Falls, NJ

Putnam Valley Student Nominated for 'Heart of a Giant' Award

He's the only New Yorker among this week's nominees, for whom you can vote until Oct. 2.NEW YORK, NY — The first set of nominees in the 2022 USA Football Heart of a Giant Award is open for voting, and Putnam Valley High School’s own Marcos Oliviera has been nominated — in fact, he's the only New Yorker on the list.The award is presented annually by Hospital for Special Surgery and the NY Giants after several rounds of voting for outstanding high school football players in the Tri-State area. Students are nom...

He's the only New Yorker among this week's nominees, for whom you can vote until Oct. 2.

NEW YORK, NY — The first set of nominees in the 2022 USA Football Heart of a Giant Award is open for voting, and Putnam Valley High School’s own Marcos Oliviera has been nominated — in fact, he's the only New Yorker on the list.

The award is presented annually by Hospital for Special Surgery and the NY Giants after several rounds of voting for outstanding high school football players in the Tri-State area. Students are nominated by their coaches for commitment, teamwork, will, character and dedication.

The voting period for this first set of nominees is now open until Oct. 2, with the final vote tally determining who will be named the group’s finalist.

Overall, there will be six weekly finalists and five wild card finalists, leading to 11 total honorees. Each finalist will receive $1,000 for their high school’s football program, with the grand prize winner’s school getting an additional $10,000. The grand prize winner will be selected based on video submissions stating why they have the Heart of a Giant.

Here are the Week 1 nominees and what their coaches said:

Jayden Alvizio; Henry P. Becton Regional High School (East Rutherford, NJ)

Dedication - Jayden has shown dedication toward the program by coming back from a season ending injury as a junior to regain his starting position on the offensive line.

He was previously a starter since his freshman year and has come back and been a vocal leader. There has been some solidification with Jayden back in the trenches.

Malachi Bethea; Paterson Eastside High School (Paterson, NJ)

Dedication - Malachi lost his father at a young age. He was forced to become the man of house. Malachi works as a necessity to help his family as well as playing football and still manages to be on The National Honors Society. Malachi is in his junior season and was selected as a Captain of this year’s team by his peers. Malachi is also now rated as a three-star athlete by Rivals.

Aiden Gilbert; Sayreville War Memorial (Parlin, NJ)

Teamwork - Makes it his responsibility to know as many positions as possible to help his team and his teammates. He has switched jersey #’s mid game in order to help the team win a game after another teammate was injured. Aidan sacrificed his own comfort to play a position he had never played in a game before to help our team win.

Marcella Iversen; John P. Stevens High School (Edison, NJ)

Will - Marcella is the only female on our varsity football team and is also a team leader. She constantly strives and works to get better and doesn't back down from a challenge. She is constantly in the weight room getting stronger, great in the classroom and is our school’s student athletic advisor for our county.

Julian Jones; Monmouth Regional (Tinton Falls, NJ)

Dedication - After tearing his acl his freshman year he persevered to becoming an all division/all shore player while helping his teammates get better

Dillon Kelly; Ramsey High School (Ramsey, NJ)

Character - League championship game- during a time out, we were running a play designed to go to Dillon. It would have been his 4th TD of the game. He had asked if the ball can go to a senior instead. He is a team first guy and role model in our community.

Ryan Lawrence; Caldwell High School (West Caldwell, NJ)

Teamwork - Ryan Lawrence is an outstanding teammate. He embodies all of the characteristics mentioned. He is willing to do whatever is asked of him regardless of how it would affect him personally. He has been asked to change positions which is in the best interest of the team, while not exactly what is best for himself.

Marcos Oliviera; Putnam Valley High School (Putnam Valley, NY)

Character - Marcos is a phenomenal person. Athletics aside he is a standout in the classroom, in the hallways, and outside of school. Marcos is the type of student that still uses the phrases, “yes sir” and “yes ma’am.” He holds his academics on the same pedestal as his athletics and is one of the hardest working individuals that I have seen in a very long time. Marcos walks to and a from school many practices, dedicates his lunches to extra help with teachers and spends many weekends helping his father in the Bronx. In my eleven years coaching Marcos joins (Rahhim Shillingford- heart of the giant recipient and Darnel Shillingford- golden dozen winner) in the top three players with the highest level of character. In so, I feel that he not only meets the criteria for character but also embodies commitment, teamwork, dedication, and will.

Amauri Younger; James Ferris High School (Jersey City, NJ)

Character - Amauri has shown his dedication to helping other by working at homeless shelter during the summers before practice, while also working a part time job to help family bills.

Zyier Younger; Newark East Side High School (Newark, NJ)

Dedication - Has witnessed a tragedy within his household and uses football as his way of dealing with it — he is his brother’s keeper

Editor's Note: The grand prize winner will win an additional $10,000; Heart Of A Giant provided wrong information for the original version of this report.

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

Monmouth Medical Center unveils plans for Vogel Medical Campus at Tinton Falls

Investment in state-of-the-art facility at historic site advances bold vision to transform health care throughout regionMonmouth Medical Center and RWJBarnabas Health unveiled plans this week for the construction of the Vogel Medical Campus, which is made possible by a historic $50 million gift to MMC from local philanthropists Sheldon Vogel and the late Anne Vogel.Con...

Investment in state-of-the-art facility at historic site advances bold vision to transform health care throughout region

Monmouth Medical Center and RWJBarnabas Health unveiled plans this week for the construction of the Vogel Medical Campus, which is made possible by a historic $50 million gift to MMC from local philanthropists Sheldon Vogel and the late Anne Vogel.

Construction on the state-of-the-art outpatient care center — at the former Fort Monmouth Myer Center site in Tinton Falls — will incorporate future-focused and innovative elements that will greatly improve both the practitioner and patient experience, officials said. The facilities are being designed alongside Monmouth’s expert clinicians and will leverage the very latest advances in medical space planning and technology.

Groundbreaking is expected to take place in early 2023.

The Vogel Medical Campus at Tinton Falls will bring world-class care to a convenient location where patients can access services in one place — creating a seamless and exceptional experience. The outpatient center will include surgical and imaging services, physician offices and support services. Patients will also have access to comprehensive cancer care provided in partnership with Rutgers Cancer Institute of New Jersey, the state’s only National Cancer Institute-designated Comprehensive Cancer Center.

“We are working to create an outstanding experience by making high-quality services available when, where and how patients prefer,” Eric Carney, CEO and president of Monmouth Medical Center, said. “As an expansion of the MMC campus in Long Branch, the Vogel Medical Campus is located within the communities we already serve. It will be a future-forward facility uniquely tailored to meet the needs of our diverse and growing community.”

The development of the Vogel Medical Campus is part of MMC’s mission to create an integrated outpatient network that helps patients maintain wellness and meet their care needs today and in the future. It is also supported by RWJBH’s expansive primary and specialty care provider network throughout the region. Recent advancements include:

“The need for extraordinary care close to home has never been more important. Through our thoughtful expansion, we’re reimagining how patients interact with their health care,” Bill Arnold, CEO and president of Robert Wood Johnson University Hospital and president of RWJBarnabas Health’s Southern Region stated. “By listening to and learning from those we serve and partner with, we’re shaping the future of care in the region together.”

“We are proud of the confidence placed in us to transform health care in the region, and we will continue working with our patients, communities and partners to determine the best path forward together,” Carney said.

N.J. man dedicates his spare time to maintaining graves of Black veterans who served in the Civil War

Ron Errickson, Jr.’s goal is to preserve New Jersey history by cleaning up veteran’s cemeteries in his free time.Errickson began tidying cemeteries in 2020 when he found out that there were veteran burial grounds across the Garden State that were unkept, some untouched for decades.Pine Brook Cemetery, located in Tinton Falls, is one of the cemeteries Errickson takes care of. The cemetery was established in 1852, and many of those interred there are Black soldiers who served in the Civil War. The small cemetery is fi...

Ron Errickson, Jr.’s goal is to preserve New Jersey history by cleaning up veteran’s cemeteries in his free time.

Errickson began tidying cemeteries in 2020 when he found out that there were veteran burial grounds across the Garden State that were unkept, some untouched for decades.

Pine Brook Cemetery, located in Tinton Falls, is one of the cemeteries Errickson takes care of. The cemetery was established in 1852, and many of those interred there are Black soldiers who served in the Civil War. The small cemetery is filled with barely legible headstones, some burial plots only having a piece of wood to identify where a body was buried.

“Buried in the cemetery, I know there’s perhaps twenty former U.S. Colored Troops,” Robert Grant, a local historian, said. “They served in the Civil War, and fought for the North.”

Errickson, who works two jobs, dedicates his weekends to maintaining the cemetery. He lives in Jamesburg, located about 40 minutes away. Errickson said although gas prices are high, it’s worth the drive.

“I felt it was needed, to clean it up with the spare time I have instead of sitting down in the house not doing a thing,” said Errickson.

He has spent over 34 hours volunteering his time at the cemetery, with the cleanup still in progress. Earlier this month, he spent his 32nd birthday working at the burial grounds. Some of the work Errickson performs is leaf, stick and limb removal, leaf blowing, weed whacking, chainsawing dead trees and raking.

“It was worth being there ‘cause I wouldn’t have what I have today without our veterans and servicemen and women who fought for us and who are still fighting for us,” said Erickkson.

Errickson has tried to organize volunteers, but that has been difficult, adding he’s thankful for any time donated to help him preserve the site. Errickson, when he is not working, will spend this Memorial Day weekend back at the cemetery.

The last known work done at the cemetery took place between 2008-09 as part of an Eagle Scout service project by Alex Johnson, a member of Troop 49.

Tucked away in a local forest, the cemetery is owned by the St. Thomas A.M.E. Zion Church. In 2004, it was declared a local historic site by Tinton Falls. Scattered throughout the grounds are American flags on the burial plots designated as being where a Black veteran burial in interred.

Errickson believes these cemeteries should be maintained at least once a week in an effort to preserve these burial grounds, and their connection to the past.

“We have an issue in the state, let alone this county, about history just being left in ruins with our veterans that helped us get to where we are today,” said Errickson. “Any help is better than no help.”

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

Many of the worst nursing homes in N.J. have not gotten any better, report shows. Here’s the list.

More than six months after a state watchdog flagged New Jersey’s worst nursing homes, the Office of the State Comptroller said more than half failed to improve their quality of care.In an ...

More than six months after a state watchdog flagged New Jersey’s worst nursing homes, the Office of the State Comptroller said more than half failed to improve their quality of care.

In an updated report released on Thursday, the comptroller complained that the nursing homes it had identified received more than $107 million of the hundreds of millions in Medicaid dollars paid out each year by the state, despite being repeatedly cited for serious health and safety issues.

“Should New Jersey be spending hundreds of millions to subsidize low-quality care?” asked Acting State Comptroller Kevin Walsh. “We should demand more.”

The comptroller’s initial report in February named 15 facilities which Walsh’s office said had failed to improve for years, yet had not faced any significant consequences. Fourteen out of the 15 were for-profit facilities and several were affiliated with other poorly rated long-term care providers, according to the February report.

Since the February report was issued, 6 of the 15 moved off the list. They included: Care One at Evesham in Marlton; Complete Care at Fair Lawn Edge in Paterson; Cranford Park Rehabilitation & Healthcare Center in Cranford; Lakeview Rehabilitation and Care Center in Wayne; Riverview Estates in Riverton; and Wardell Gardens at Tinton Falls.

However, three new nursing homes were added to the list on Thursday. Nine nursing homes previously named by the comptroller showed no improvement and remained on the list. Together, the 12 nursing homes are being paid $107 million per year in Medicaid funding for approximately 1,835 beneficiaries, according to the comptroller.

There are 368 nursing homes in New Jersey.

Walsh said in the wake of his report earlier this year, the New Jersey Department of Human Services decided to withhold so-called “quality incentive payments” to those low-ranked operators, which amounts to thousands of dollars in additional reimbursements. But he pointed that Medicaid itself makes no distinction between high-quality care or low-quality care in its reimbursement policies.

A bad nursing home gets the same per-resident reimbursement as a good one, he complained, which he said makes it more profitable for nursing home operator to provide bad care.

“Low-quality cannot be a business model,” said Walsh in an interview.

None of the nursing homes named by the comptroller responded to requests for comment. Industry officials, though, disputed the findings and said some of the comptroller’s conclusions were misleading or wrong.

“The comptroller’s report does not reflect timely or accurate information,” said Andrew Aronson, president and CEO of the Health Care Association of New Jersey, which represents the state’s long-term care industry. “Several of the facilities that have not yet ‘graduated’ from the list since February are long overdue for state survey that would confirm their improvement.”

State staffing shortages and the continuing fallout of the pandemic has had an impact on the Department of Health’s regular inspection surveys.

At the same time, Aronson argued that the majority of the facilities identified by the comptroller have new ownership that has invested significant funds to improve the operations.

“The challenges of the staffing shortages at the DOH have prevented the state from acquiring correct information,” he said.

Among the facilities named in the report included Woodland Behavioral and Nursing Center, which was forced by the state to shut down last month amid of revelations alleging neglectful or abusive care over the past year. Once one of the largest nursing homes in the state, Woodland has been the focus of increasing scrutiny since the discovery of 17 unclaimed bodies in April 2000, some being stored in a makeshift morgue, at the height of the COVID pandemic.

The comptroller’s report listed all the nursing homes in New Jersey receiving a rating of “one-star” by the U.S. Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, or CMS, for six of the past eight quarters, from October 2020 to July 2022.

Under the CMS rating system, facilities are judged by such criteria as staffing levels, health inspections, and quality measures. Five-star, or “much above average, is the highest ranking. One-star, or “much below average,” is the lowest.

According to the comptroller, CMS overall ratings dating back to 2013 reveals that some of the nursing homes on the list have been among the lowest-rated long-term care facilities in the state for many years.

“Others appear to have deteriorated over the past several years and remained low. Some experienced fast and precipitous declines, and have remained among the lowest-rated in recent years,” the comptroller’s report noted.

Several of the nursing homes on the list were designated as a Special Focus Facility, or SFF, placing them among other facilities that have a pattern of serious health and safety violations.

The report said all 12 facilities were operated by for-profit companies which “failed to improve conditions on a sustained basis for years.”

A spokesman for the state Department of Human Services confirmed that it had cut quality incentive payments, or QIPP, to the 12 nursing homes.

“Delivering safe and high quality health care coverage and spending resources effectively is at the core of Medicaid’s mission, and we will continue to work with partners across state and federal government to ensure the best possible care for residents at New Jersey’s long term care facilities,” said the spokesman, Tom Hester.

He noted that the department “is always looking at ways to improve quality programs, and the most recent changes to QIPP stem from the comptroller’s report and other considerations including a review of national standards.”

The goal, he added, “is and always will be taking steps to promote quality care.”

Local journalism needs your support. Subscribe at nj.com/supporter.

Man Ran Into Burning Middletown Home, Saves Dog: Hear His Story

This Tinton Falls man recounts how he stopped his car and ran into the burning home Tuesday afternoon, finding a teen inside grabbing a dog:MIDDLETOWN, NJ — On Tuesday afternoon, a house fire occurred in the River Plaza section of Middletown, and several people passing by ran into the burning home to save the dog.Now on Wednesday, Patch has located one of the people who ran into th...

This Tinton Falls man recounts how he stopped his car and ran into the burning home Tuesday afternoon, finding a teen inside grabbing a dog:

MIDDLETOWN, NJ — On Tuesday afternoon, a house fire occurred in the River Plaza section of Middletown, and several people passing by ran into the burning home to save the dog.

Now on Wednesday, Patch has located one of the people who ran into the burning home and pulled the dog to safety, likely saving the animal's life.

"I had just got off work that morning and was doing some errands. I had to go by my girlfriend's house in River Plaza to drop off some things," said Tyler Hubeny, 33, who lives in Tinton Falls. "All of a sudden, I see this other driver just stop in the middle of the street and run out of his car. I was like, 'What is this dude doing?' Then I looked and saw a house was on fire."

It was just past 2 p.m. on the 400 block of West Front Street. Flames were coming from the left side of the single-story wooden home.

Hubeny is actually employed as a professional firefighter with the city of Bayonne. He said he quickly parked and ran up the front steps to the burning home.

"The fire was contained to the outside of the house, but you could see it growing," he said. "There was a woman and what looked to be her 17-year-old son who had also pulled over and were on the property. I ran into the house to make sure nobody was inside; it is just instinct to me."

Hubeny said unbeknownst to him, the 17-year-old was already inside the house and when he ran into the living room, he found the teen carrying a dog inside a crate outside.

"I ran to help him. I was like, 'Come on, let's do this.'" He said the dog appeared to be a mid-sized hunting dog and appeared uninjured or unharmed. He also said there was no smoke or flames inside the home when they pulled the dog out.

Hubeny said the teen stayed with the dog on the front yard, and he actually ran back inside to make sure the house was totally empty, and to close all the home's interior doors.

"Yes, not many people know to do this, but you should do that to make sure the fire has nothing to feed on," he explained. "It really can help prevent the fire from spreading inside a home and causing even more damage."

But Hubeny said when he went inside the second time, smoke had started to come into the living room and fill the home's eves and ceiling area.

The homeowners were not home at the time of the fire, he said. He said as long as he remained on the scene they never showed up. A cause of the fire has not been determined by Middletown firefighters, but the fire appears to have started outside the home.

He said he still would like to locate the 17-year-old teen who ran into the burning home before he did, as the young man is a hero.

"He was just a kid. I couldn't believe it when I found him in there," he said. "I come from a family of cops, firefighters and nurses. I just did what came naturally in that moment."

Initial report: Dog Rescued From Middletown House Fire Tuesday Afternoon (Aug. 30)

Correction: It did not take Middletown volunteer fire trucks "10-15 minutes" to arrive at the scene of the fire, as Hubeny recollected. The first fire truck was there in just over 5 minutes, corrected the Middletown Fire Department. Patch apologizes for the error.

Get more local news delivered straight to your inbox. Sign up for free Patch newsletters and alerts.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.