BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Shrewsbury township

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Shrewsbury township, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Shrewsbury Township, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Shrewsbury Township, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Shrewsbury Township, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Shrewsbury Township, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Shrewsbury township

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Shrewsbury township:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Shrewsbury Township, NJ

Latest News in Shrewsbury township, NJ

New Jersey American Water Plans for Temporary Water Treatment Changes in Monmouth and Ocean County

CAMDEN, N.J. – As part of an annual maintenance program for its water distribution system, New Jersey American Water will temporarily change the water treatment process from a chloramine (combination) residual to free chlorine residual at the company’s Swimming River Water Treatment Plant in Colts Neck and its Jumping Brook Water Treatment Plant in Neptune.The temporary treatment process will begin the week of February 14, 2022 and continue until April 2022. During this period, some customers may notice a ...

CAMDEN, N.J. – As part of an annual maintenance program for its water distribution system, New Jersey American Water will temporarily change the water treatment process from a chloramine (combination) residual to free chlorine residual at the company’s Swimming River Water Treatment Plant in Colts Neck and its Jumping Brook Water Treatment Plant in Neptune.

The temporary treatment process will begin the week of February 14, 2022 and continue until April 2022. During this period, some customers may notice a slight taste and smell of chlorine in their water. This is normal and will only be temporary until the system maintenance is complete. Customers who wish to reduce the taste of chlorine can place water in an uncovered glass container in the refrigerator overnight to dissipate chlorine faster.

New Jersey American Water will monitor water quality in the system to provide that customers continue to receive water that meets or is better than federal and state drinking water standards.

The temporary treatment change applies to New Jersey American Water customers in the following communities:

Aberdeen, Allenhurst, Asbury Park City, Atlantic Highlands, Avon, Bay Head, Belmar, Bradley Beach, Colts Neck Township, Deal, Eatontown, Elberon, Fair Haven, Hazlet, Highlands, Holmdel Township, Interlaken, Keansburg, Lake Como, Little Silver, Loch Arbor Village, Long Branch City, Matawan, Middletown Township, Monmouth Beach, Neptune City, Neptune Township (incl. Ocean Grove), Ocean Township, Oceanport, Red Bank, Rumson, Sea Bright, Shrewsbury, Shrewsbury Township, Tinton Falls, Union Beach, Wanamassa, and West Long Branch.

This temporary treatment change also applies to residents living in the following communities that purchase water from New Jersey American Water: Aberdeen Township, Avon, Belmar, Keyport, Lake Como, Matawan, Naval Weapons Station Earle, Keansburg and Point Pleasant Borough.

New Jersey American Water has used chloramines in its water treatment process for customers in Monmouth and Ocean counties since 2012. For more information, visit newjerseyamwater.com.

About New Jersey American WaterNew Jersey American Water, a subsidiary of American Water (NYSE: AWK), is the largest investor-owned water utility in the state, providing high-quality and reliable water and/or wastewater services to approximately 2.8 million people. For more information, visit www.newjerseyamwater.com and follow New Jersey American Water on Twitter and Facebook.

About American Water

With a history dating back to 1886, American Water (NYSE: AWK) is the largest and most geographically diverse U.S. publicly traded water and wastewater utility company. The company employs approximately 6,400 dedicated professionals who provide regulated and regulated-like drinking water and wastewater services to an estimated 14 million people in 25 states. American Water provides safe, clean, affordable and reliable water services to our customers to help keep their lives flowing. For more information, visit amwater.com and follow American Water on Twitter, Facebook and LinkedIn.

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Jersey Shore Chic Collides With New York Style At New Clothing Store In Shrewsbury, NJ

We have a new business that just opened up at the Jersey Shore and lucky us, it is run by two born-and-raised Jersey boys.You shoppers are going to want to know about this.Have you ever heard of Faherty?According to APP.com, it is a fashion brand that just opened a new location at the Grove in Shrewsbury.They sel...

We have a new business that just opened up at the Jersey Shore and lucky us, it is run by two born-and-raised Jersey boys.

You shoppers are going to want to know about this.

Have you ever heard of Faherty?

According to APP.com, it is a fashion brand that just opened a new location at the Grove in Shrewsbury.

They sell clothing, sunglasses, hats, beach blankets and other beach accessories for men, women and kids.

Here is how Faherty is described on their official website:

"Inspired by the sun, Faherty is a family brand all about great quality, legendary comfort and good vibes. We are fueled by purpose and leaving the world better than we found it."

It is run by two Spring Lake natives, Alex and Mike Faherty, who put Faherty into a very specific fashion niche growing in popularity on the East Coast.

According to APP.com, Faherty, "merges [the] Jersey Shore surfer [style] with the high-quality fashion of New York City."

"It's stuff you want to wear when you're having your best moments, whether you're at the beach or on vacation," said Alex Faherty according to APP.com. "It's all rooted back in really high-quality fabrics, sustainable fabrics, just an embodiment of part of our life growing up on the Jersey Shore mixed with living in New York City."

You may have heard of them prior because they already have 40 other stores across the country. Other New Jersey locations include Spring Lake and Short Hills Mall.

You can also shop online if getting off the couch doesn't sound like your cup of tea right now.

Once you got your new outfit, here is where you should visit:

30 Special and Unique New Jersey Towns You Must Visit

By JackTheVicar at English Wikipedia, CC BY-SA 3.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=61658450

Spring Street is the heart of Newton in north Jersey. Walk along this downtown street and find many killer dining and shopping options. The Newton Theater also hosts lots of great entertainment.

Princeton is probably one of the most famous college towns in the world. If you've never been, you have to check out the university. The Princeton Art Museum and the Record Exchange are must-dos. The food options are amazing, too. The Bent Spoon, Blue Point Grill, and Seasons 52 are tops.

Situated on the Delaware River, Milford has lots of history. Hit up Bridge Street, and The Ship Inn, New Jersey’s very first pub.

Right on the Raritan River, Clinton is one of the most beautiful towns in New Jersey. The picture above has been on many a postcard. That red structure is Red Mill Museum. If you're a foodie, head to downtown Chester. You won't me disappointed.

Frenchtown is a great small town for shopping in the many boutiques. The city is always hopping. They have three big annual festivals: Wine and Art in May, RiverFest in September, and Bastille Day in July.

Bay Head is the perfect Ocean County beach town. Bay Head is a dry town meaning there are no bars within the town limits. Grab coffee and crumb cake from Mueller’s Bakery.

Located just outside Philadelphia, Cherry Hill has a lot to offer. For example, Croft Farm, an 80-acre historic center that was once part of the Underground Railroad, but which is now a performing arts center. The kids will love the Garden State Discovery Museum and the dining options are endless.

If you're going to pick a time of year to go to Branchville, go in the fall. The changing of the leaves and vivid color are some of the best in the state. This is truly a town for outdoor lovers. Located near the Delaware Water Gap, boaters, hikers, and picnickers get a perfect view of the Delaware River.

By Mr. Matté (if there is an issue with this image, contact me using this image's Commons talk page or my English Wikipedia talk page; I'll know about it a lot faster) - Own work, CC BY 4.0, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=50675285

Medford is a small and charming town. Downtown on Main Street there are loads of interesting stores. Get a meal at Braddock’s, named after one of Medford’s earliest families.

By <a rel="nofollow" class="external text" href="https://www.flickr.com/people/[email protected]">Beatrice Murch</a> from Buenos Aires, Argentina - <a rel="nofollow" class="external text" href="https://www.flickr.com/photos/blmurch/557511189/">Glen Rock, NJ</a>, CC BY-SA 2.0, Link

There it is. The actual Glen Rock. One of the highlights of the town may sound silly, but the Starbucks is unlike anything you've ever seen. It looks more like a castle. Go downtown for everything from a tarot card reading to a bite from popular spots like John’s Boy Pizzeria and Marc’s cheesecake store.

Oldwick was once called New Germantown. It used to be a major farming community. Oldwick Historic District, and the Taylor’s Mill Historic District, both have really cool shops and eateries.

Named Rocky Hill because, well, it's rocky. If you're a beer lover, you have to make a stop in this Somerset County town. More specifically Rocky Hill Inn. The Inn is one of New Jersey’s best-known gastropubs, and highly respected for its world-class craft beers and microbrews.

If you get to this town in Somerset County and it looks familiar, there's a reason. Peapack-Gladstone is used very often as a Hollywood filming location.

Want to go back in time? Belvidere is your town. Located in Warren County, it has more Victorian houses than any other town in New Jersey. There are festivals year round celebrating its history. Plus, if you like to be active outdoors, Belvidere is situated between two rivers perfect for rafting, canoeing or boating.

By Dough4872 - Own work, Public Domain, https://commons.wikimedia.org/w/index.php?curid=24102939

Brigantine is an awesome south Jersey beach town minutes away from Atlantic City. There more to Brigantine than the beach, though. Visit the Marine Mammal Stranding Center to learn about the stranded dolphins, seals, and sea turtles rescued by the Center.

By <a href="//commons.wikimedia.org/wiki/User:Saucemaster" title="User:Saucemaster">Saucemaster</a> - <span class="int-own-work" lang="en">Own work</span>, CC BY-SA 3.0, Link

Collingswood has plenty for everyone. Shopping is the main draw to this town, but there are other activities to put on your list. You must have a meal at Kitchen Consigliere, a downtown Italian restaurant. Also, taste test more than 50 types of olive oil at Blue Moon.

One of the nicest beach towns in New Jersey. Whether you’re there to hit the beach, stroll the boardwalk (without retailers) or shop downtown, there's something for everyone. Third Avenue Chocolate Shoppe and the Scone Pony are must-sees.

Chester is very unique. It is home to one of only two cotton candy stores in the entire country. imagiNations is a cool shop that sells gifts from all around the world.

Have you ever seen or been a part of a porch party? Every week neighbors take turns hosting small gatherings on their porches. Downtown there's Cranbury Book Worm, one of New Jersey’s best independent bookstores.

Located in Hunterdon County, Lambertville is a small riverfront town that specializes in the arts. The restaurant scene is pretty impressive, too. In fact, one of New Jersey’s most famously unique bars, The Boat House, is located in Lambertville.

You may not expect to find a dinosaur in New Jersey, but Haddonfield’s downtown is home to Hadrosaurus foulkii, which was one of the most complete dinosaur skeletons unearthed when it was found in 1858.

Located just north of Trenton in Mercer County, Hopewell is home to just 2,000 people. It's most popular for antique stores. This brick library is a century old and used to be a bank.

New Jersey Towns With The Weirdest Names, Part 1

Bargaintown, NJ - Pictured: street sign.

Saving some money? Located in Atlantic County, Bargaintown gets its name from being quite the bargain to buy. According to Wikipedia, "Bargaintown was laid out by a property developer who hoped the value would increase quickly, but when it did not, he sold the lots cheaply."

Buttzville, NJ - Pictured: Map of the area

Cheesequake, NJ - Pictured, Cheesequake School

I love The Cheesecake Factory and, even though it has nothing to do with this town, this name excites me. Located in Middlesex County, the name Cheesequake comes from a Lenni Lenape word meaning "upland."

When I moved to Bayville, I messed this one up a good 3 times. Located in Ocean County, Forked River isn't pronounced how it sounds. It's not like an eating utensil. Forked is pronounced with two syllables, For-kid.

Harvey Cedars, NJ - Pictured, Harvey Cedars Water Tower

Located in Ocean County, Harvy Cedars has a population of only about 350 people. It's hard to say where the name comes from but Wikipedia speculates it, "may be derived from the "harvest" housing used by these farmers and the "cedars" that grew in the area." PS - There's a webcam on the top of the water tower with an incredible view of the beach. Check it out here.

I think we need a Hey-You, sadly we do not. Located in Camden County, the origin of Hi-Nella is unclear. Some speculate it comes from an Indian word meaning "high ground" or perhaps a businessman named it after his wife Nella.

What's with the hyphens? Located in Bergen County, Ho-Ho-Kus and the origin of its name is disputed with several theories from multiple Native American meanings.

Election 2022: Mark D. Taylor, Red Bank Borough Council

Patch is asking municipal candidates to share their views on the issues. Republican Mark D. Taylor of Red Bank presents his ideas.RED BANK, NJ — Republican Mark D. Taylor is one of four candidates seeking two full-term seats on the Red Bank Borough Council in the Nov. 8 general election.In these profiles, candidates provide voters with background about themselves and their positions on the issues. Patch will publish individual profiles leading to the election.Taylor said the goals of his campaign are twofold: Fir...

Patch is asking municipal candidates to share their views on the issues. Republican Mark D. Taylor of Red Bank presents his ideas.

RED BANK, NJ — Republican Mark D. Taylor is one of four candidates seeking two full-term seats on the Red Bank Borough Council in the Nov. 8 general election.

In these profiles, candidates provide voters with background about themselves and their positions on the issues. Patch will publish individual profiles leading to the election.

Taylor said the goals of his campaign are twofold: First, to ensure passage of a vote to change the Red Bank form of government to a nonpartisan form. Second, he hopes his election and that of his running mate Jonathan Penney would restore "order and dignity" to the Borough Council that has seen dissension among its Democratic members.

Read more about candidate Mark D. Taylor:

Name: Mark D. Taylor

Age: 39

Town of residence: Red Bank

Position sought: Red Bank Council

Are you an incumbent or previous governing member? Yes, I previously was elected to the Council and served from 2016-2018. I was also recently elected to serve on the Charter Study Commission this past year.

Party affiliation: Republican

Family: My wife, Ashley, and I have a 4-year old son and just welcomed our daughter on Sept. 22. We also have two rescue dogs. My parents have lived in Red Bank since 1975 and my sister, her husband and three children also live in town.

Education: B.A. and a B.S. from the University of Scranton and a J.D. from Widener University School of Law

Occupation: Civil litigation attorney in Monmouth County

Name the top issues currently facing your town and how you plan to address them:

Identify one or more specific goals you have to enhance life in your town:

It's hard to underscore just how divisive the current council has made things and how they've made it nearly impossible to govern. Red Bank has lost talented employees and others have been unceremoniously fired as part of this political bloodletting.

Sadly, just restoring honor and a sense of leadership is my goal for this six month interim period as we usher in the new government.

What in your experience or background prepares you for election to office:

As a lifelong resident of Red Bank, I have developed relationships with a broad spectrum of residents, business owners and other stakeholders who want to see Red Bank be the best version of itself.

Importantly, I previously served as a councilman so I know how to govern effectively and with respect. In 2021, I was again elected, this time as a member of the Charter Study Commission where I served as vice chair. The Commission recommended the change to nonpartisan elections which forms the basis of the public question on the November ballot.

Candidates for Red Bank Mayor and Borough Council are:

Mayor (Full Term, Vote for One)

Borough Council (Full Term, Vote for Two)

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Shrewsbury Borough Bond Referendum Leaves Some Residents Annoyed

SHREWSBURY – On Oct. 6, residents of Shrewsbury Borough will make a special trip to the polls to vote on a school board bond referendum. A bond referendum is a community vote to authorize the borrowing of funds through the sale of bonds to generate upfront funding for projects that would impact the existing operating budget.In this instance, residents will vote on whether to fund a $22.5 million upgrade to the Shrewsbury Borough School. The project includes upgrades to safety and security, HVAC and air quality systems, a dedicat...

SHREWSBURY – On Oct. 6, residents of Shrewsbury Borough will make a special trip to the polls to vote on a school board bond referendum. A bond referendum is a community vote to authorize the borrowing of funds through the sale of bonds to generate upfront funding for projects that would impact the existing operating budget.

In this instance, residents will vote on whether to fund a $22.5 million upgrade to the Shrewsbury Borough School. The project includes upgrades to safety and security, HVAC and air quality systems, a dedicated lunchroom, three new classrooms for pre-K students, and a multipurpose room with a partition. This referendum comes with an “all or nothing” stipulation; residents cannot choose which aspects of the project they think should be included and which should not.

While school construction projects provide much-needed improvements for students, they also often come with a hefty price tag, which can make bond referendums a tough sell to voters, especially in the midst of national inflation. The proposed project would raise $22.5 million but would add approximately $44 per month ($528 per year) to residents’ property taxes for an average home assessed at $580,785.

While school construction projects provide much-needed improvements for students, they also often come with a hefty price tag, which can make bond referendums a tough sell to voters, especially in the midst of national inflation.

On a Shrewsbury residents’ Facebook page, some have complained that only parents of students in the school were notified by mail of bond referendum meetings and the upcoming vote. Some even claim they were barred from a meeting – at an over-55 facility – to discuss the project. Others point out that in uncertain economic times, such an undertaking is ill advised, given that since 2004, student enrollment has steadily declined by approximately 18% overall. The current enrollment is about 460.

In response, Shrewsbury Borough School Board of Education member Michael Galvin posted on the page to explain that outreach efforts went far beyond the building of a bond-specific website (sbs-nj.org/vote) to answer questions and outline the project. To enhance their outreach beyond the website, the BOE formed a referendum committee of parents, school staff, seniors, and others, to ensure people know about the referendum; mailed information on the referendum to each residence in the borough, with the next mailer scheduled for Sept. 29 or 30; opened the school in the morning and in the evening for information sessions and building tour; hosted a Zoom session with professional advisors and posted the recording on YouTube; visited or attempted to visit 55-plus communities and residences; and installed nonpartisan signs throughout the borough to spur discussions and raise awareness.

BOE members also offered to personally drop off information and discuss the program with residents and hosted neighbors in their homes for both planned and ad hoc events.

For those with additional questions about bond referendum and the project it will fund, contact the Shrewsbury Borough Board of Education at [email protected], 732-747-0882 or via mail at Shrewsbury Borough Board of Education, 20 Obre Place, Shrewsbury, NJ 07702.

The article originally appeared in the September 29 – October 5, 2022 print edition of The Two River Times.

Shrewsbury Borough School Invites the Community to Bond Referendum Informational Events

The Shrewsbury Borough School District invites the community to several in-person and virtual events in September to learn about the Oct. 6 bond referendum. Borough residents can learn about the projects and ask questions before the Oct. 6 vote.These events will lead up to the vote on Thursday, Oct. 6. The district is asking the community to consider one ballot question that would provide funding for safety and security upgrades, critical maintenance, and a 21,300-square-foot addition to help keep class sizes small and expand the pre...

The Shrewsbury Borough School District invites the community to several in-person and virtual events in September to learn about the Oct. 6 bond referendum. Borough residents can learn about the projects and ask questions before the Oct. 6 vote.

These events will lead up to the vote on Thursday, Oct. 6. The district is asking the community to consider one ballot question that would provide funding for safety and security upgrades, critical maintenance, and a 21,300-square-foot addition to help keep class sizes small and expand the pre-Kindergarten program.

“This special vote is important to the future of our school and gives the community a voice and a vote,” said Superintendent Brent MacConnell. “While our school building is well maintained and a source of pride for this community, it needs to have updated security and safety features and be enlarged to meet the needs of our current and future students.”

Residents who attend the two in-person info sessions can interact and ask questions one-on-one of the district’s architect, financial adviser, bond counsel, teachers, board members, and superintendent. The evening session will also allow for building tours to see locations in the school that would be upgraded if the referendum passes.

The virtual session on Sept. 20 provides another opportunity for residents if they cannot attend an in-person event. Residents can ask questions during the virtual session or in advance by emailing [email protected].

“We hope to see all Shrewsbury Borough residents at these events,” said Board of Education President Jessica Groom. “A bond referendum provides a smart financial path for our community to make critical upgrades to the school at a significant cost advantage.”

If approved by voters, the projects will cost $22.5 million, and state aid would cover $4.7 million, or 21%. This is money that Shrewsbury residents have already paid through state taxes that they can now bring home to invest in Shrewsbury Borough School.

The net tax impact is estimated to be around $44 per month for a home assessed at Shrewsbury’s average of $580,785. This is the “net tax impact” because the district will finish paying off debt in 2023 from the last bond referendum and will simultaneously take on new debt if the bond referendum passes. Visit sbs-nj.org/vote for a tax impact calculator and more information.

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