BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Millstone

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Millstone, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Basement Leak Repair Millstone, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Millstone, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Millstone

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Millstone:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Millstone, NJ

Latest News in Millstone, NJ

Hexa Builders application will have special meeting in Millstone Township

MILLSTONE — The public hearing on an application that proposes the construction of a 170-unit residential development is scheduled to continue during a special meeting of the Millstone Township Planning Board that has been scheduled for Aug. 2.Hexa Builders, LLC, is seeking preliminary and final major site plan approval to construct a development at 711 Perrineville Road, Millstone Township, near Route 571 and the border of East Windsor.The application has been heard by the board on March 9, May 11 and during a special me...

MILLSTONE — The public hearing on an application that proposes the construction of a 170-unit residential development is scheduled to continue during a special meeting of the Millstone Township Planning Board that has been scheduled for Aug. 2.

Hexa Builders, LLC, is seeking preliminary and final major site plan approval to construct a development at 711 Perrineville Road, Millstone Township, near Route 571 and the border of East Windsor.

The application has been heard by the board on March 9, May 11 and during a special meeting on June 29. No decision regarding the application has been made by the board members. Attorney John Giunco represents Hexa Builders.

Following the presentation of testimony on June 29, the application was carried to the board’s July 13 meeting, but testimony was not heard that evening.

During the July 13 meeting, board members voted to carry the Hexa Builders public hearing to a special meeting on Aug. 2. The meeting will begin at 7 p.m. and will be held in the Wagner Farm Park facility, Baird Road.

Representatives of Hexa Builders have said the proposed development at 711 Perrineville Road will consist of 18 buildings on a 36-acre lot. There will be 122 townhouses constructed in 16 buildings and 48 condominiums constructed in two buildings.

The townhouses will be sold at market rates and the condominiums will be marketed for sale under New Jersey’s affordable housing guidelines, according to the applicant.

The proposed development was initially announced by municipal officials in 2019 as part of a plan to provide opportunities for the development of affordable housing in the community.

All of Millstone Township’s previously approved affordable housing projects contain only affordable housing units. Those developments are referred to as 100% affordable housing projects.

The project envisioned by Hexa Builders is the first development proposed in Millstone Township that would include market rate homes and affordable housing units. This type of development is referred to as an inclusionary project.

The property where Hexa Builders is proposing to construct the residential units is owned by Gerald Baldachino, who presented township officials with the initial plan to develop the parcel on Perrineville Road.

During the public hearings, some board members have criticized what they said is missing information from the application. They have expressed concern about the possibility of being forced to vote on the application without having what they said is all of the necessary information.

Bottoms up: Newly-retired ex-Eagles star (and N.J. native) has big business plans with a grain of truth

Bottoms up!Former Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins is getting into the alcohol industry....

Bottoms up!

Former Philadelphia Eagles safety Malcolm Jenkins is getting into the alcohol industry.

Philadelphia Business Journal reports Jenkins is “is teaming up with New Liberty Distillery parent Millstone Spirits Group to launch a new whiskey sourced exclusively from ingredients produced by Black and Brown farmers.”

Robert Cassell, owner and master distiller at New Liberty Distillery in Philadelphia’s Olde Kensington neighborhood, and Jenkins will develop and distill a bourbon by sourcing barley, wheat, rye and corn exclusively from Black and Brown farmers. The product will aim to highlight and address the lack of diversity in the craft spirits industry, the duo said.

According to the report, Jenkins “has invested an undisclosed sum in Millstone Spirits Group. Jenkins has also become a board member at Millstone Spirits Group as part of the arrangement.”

Philadelphia Business Journal reports production will begin on the yet-to-be-named whiskey brand in the fall and “should start to hit shelves within four years.”

Jenkins, an East Orange, N.J. native who went to Piscataway High School, announced his retirement in March.

“If you go into [football] then you know your career is going to be over by the time you’re 34, then you also have to understand that that’s not going to be your purpose,” said Jenkins, who played with the Eagles for six seasons from 2014-2019. “Now I look at all of the things that we’re doing through Malcolm Inc., all of the people I’m doing business with and all the infrastructure we’re starting to create, and it feels like this is walking your purpose and walking in those talents.”

Jenkins’ career also included pair of stints with the New Orleans Saints. His resume features two Super Bowl championships and three Pro Bowl selections.

MORE NFL:

(NJ Advance Media’s Chris Franklin contributed to this report.)

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Millstone planners take issue with aspects of Hexa Builders application

MILLSTONE – Testimony regarding an application that proposes a residential development consisting of market rate and affordable housing in Millstone Township continued during a special meeting of the Planning Board on June 29, but no vote on the project was taken that evening.During the meeting, members of the board questioned the applicant’s representatives on a number of items, including plans for the development’s water and sewer systems.Hexa Builders, LLC, is seeking preliminary and final major site plan a...

MILLSTONE – Testimony regarding an application that proposes a residential development consisting of market rate and affordable housing in Millstone Township continued during a special meeting of the Planning Board on June 29, but no vote on the project was taken that evening.

During the meeting, members of the board questioned the applicant’s representatives on a number of items, including plans for the development’s water and sewer systems.

Hexa Builders, LLC, is seeking preliminary and final major site plan approval to construct a development at 711 Perrineville Road, Millstone Township, near Route 571 and the border of East Windsor. The application proposes the construction of 170 residential units.

Prior to June 29, the application was heard on March 9 and May 11. Attorney John Giunco represents Hexa Builders.

The Hexa Builders application has now been carried to the board’s July 13 meeting, although it may not be heard that evening. Instead, the board may announce the date of another special meeting on which the application will be heard.

Representatives of Hexa Builders have said the development at 711 Perrineville Road will consist of 18 buildings on a 36-acre lot. There will be 122 townhouses constructed in 16 buildings and 48 condominiums constructed in two buildings.

The townhouses will be sold at market rates and the condominiums will be marketed for sale under New Jersey’s affordable housing guidelines, according to the applicant.

The proposed development was initially announced by municipal officials in 2019 as part of the township’s plan to provide opportunities for the development of affordable housing in the community.

All of Millstone Township’s previously approved and constructed affordable housing projects contain only affordable housing units. Those developments are referred to as 100% affordable housing projects.

The project envisioned by Hexa Builders is the first development proposed in Millstone Township that would include a combination of market rate homes and affordable housing units. This type of development is referred to as an inclusionary project.

The property is owned by Gerald Baldachino, who presented the township with the initial plan to develop the property on Perrineville Road.

During the June 29 meeting of the Planning Board, engineer Gregg Barkley, representing the applicant, testified about the development’s waste water treatment facility.

Millstone Township does not have a public water system or sewer system, so the developer would need to create that infrastructure specifically for the project.

Barkley said the development’s waste water treatment facility would meet New Jersey’s standards. He described the facility as a recharge system that would generate water similar to a natural stream.

“It’s not like a septic system. It’s a lot cleaner than that,” he said of the proposed treatment facility.

Barkley explained that the primary purpose of the treatment facility would be to remove nitrates from the system and turn it into nitrogen gas.

“This is a primarily biological process, but there is some chemistry involved,” he said.

Barkley said a treatment facility operator who is licensed by the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) would be present at the site and a truck would remove the waste water from the development.

Barkley said the treatment facility has been designed to handle 49,200 gallons of water per day and would receive an estimated daily average of 25,000 gallons of water.

When asked about the infrastructure by board members, Barkley said the tanks have an estimated lifespan of more than 50 years.

Board members expressed concern the treatment facility’s pipes, which are proposed beneath an open space field, would harm the surrounding area.

“I am concerned this (will go) back to the people who live in town and they will have an extra bill,” board Vice Chairman Chris Pepe said.

In response, Barkley said the pipes would be part of a monitoring process.

Pepe was critical of the water treatment system’s design not being completed by the time of the meeting.

“We (the board) would be voting on something that has not been completed,” he said.

Another concern for the board was the residential development’s proposed water system. When asked by board members, Giunco acknowledged the applicant did not have a water system expert.

The board members indicated they believe an expert should testify as to how the development will use its water system.

Giunco said the development’s water system is under the state’s jurisdiction and the attorney said the applicant is still awaiting approval from the DEP.

As testimony concluded for the evening, Planning Board Chairman Mitchell Newman requested that the public hearing be carried to the board’s next meeting on July 13.

Giunco said the delay on a decision regarding the Hexa Builders application was “unreasonable,” but Pepe said the application was missing too much information for a decision to be made.

“You (the applicant) failed to make deadlines,” Pepe said.

Newman said the Hexa Builders application would be carried to July 13, but likely not heard because there are other applications on the agenda and because that meeting will be held in the municipal courtroom.

The Hexa Builders meetings have been held in a larger building at Wagner Farm Park.

Newman said the municipal courtroom cannot accommodate the number of people who want to hear the Hexa Builders application. He said on July 13, the board is likely to determine the next date on which the application will be heard.

D&R Canal State Park Warns Folks to Keep Away from a Harmful Algal Bloom on the Millstone River

Canal towpath walkers may have noticed the Millstone River has turned green from Rocky Hill to Manville, including Griggstown and Blackwells Mills along the way. The river also smells horrible.The D&R Canal State Park issued a code red warning on July 21, notifying the public to steer clear of the Millstone River. A Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB), which comes with a high risk of adverse health effects for people, pets, and wildlife, has been confirmed.Impact on Recreation Activities along the D&R State Park:...

Canal towpath walkers may have noticed the Millstone River has turned green from Rocky Hill to Manville, including Griggstown and Blackwells Mills along the way. The river also smells horrible.

The D&R Canal State Park issued a code red warning on July 21, notifying the public to steer clear of the Millstone River. A Harmful Algal Bloom (HAB), which comes with a high risk of adverse health effects for people, pets, and wildlife, has been confirmed.

Impact on Recreation Activities along the D&R State Park:

? Do not allow animals to eat dried algae, or groom themselves after coming into contact with the water.

? Use caution while fishing; wear gloves and/or wash your hands after touching the water.

? People, pets and livestock that come into contact with a bloom should rinse off with fresh water as soon as possible.

Land-use activities such as biking, running, or walking on the towpath/rail-trail is permitted.

HAB has NOT been found in the D&R Canal. Both the Millstone River and the parallel canal provide drinking water to large portions of central New Jersey, as well as providing recreational uses as well.

Operating since 1931, the Raritan-Millstone Water Treatment Plant, the largest in New Jersey American Water’s system, is located at the confluence of the Raritan and Millstone Rivers. It provides water to more than 1.2 to 1.5 million people in seven counties in central New Jersey, according to amwater.com/njaw.

The NJ Department of Environmental Protection is monitoring the water, and will advise the state park officials and the water company on how to move forward.

Harmful Algal Blooms (HABs) are not caused by true algae but rather by cyanobacteria that in many ways resemble and behave like algae. These cyanobacteria naturally occur in fresh water and can proliferate to unhealthful levels in sunlight and hot weather, forming dense mats resembling pea soup or spilled paint.

The confirmed toxins present in the Millstone River, as tested at the Route 518 bridge in Rocky Hill in late July, are microcystins.

“These potent toxins are known to be toxic to fish, mammals (including humans), and birds through skin contact, ingestion, and possibly inhalation,” according to a study by Cindy P. Driscoll of the Maryland Department of Natural Resources.

The NJ DEP warns that human exposure can cause a range of health effects, including rashes, allergy-like reactions, flu-like symptoms, gastroenteritis, respiratory irritation, skin rashes and eye irritation.

Microcystin poisoning has also been linked to the mortality and illness of great blue herons.

The duration of a Harmful Algal Bloom is unpredictable, and may be influenced by availability of nutrients and weather conditions, according to the DEP’s Division of Water Monitoring and Standards.

The Watershed Institute in Pennington is helping to clear up a recent algal bloom in the Mercer County Park Systems’ Rosedale Lake. The lake was closed to public use in 2021 from early July through mid-November.

“For several summers, many New Jersey waterways — including Rosedale Lake — have been closed to swimming, fishing, and other recreation because of the rise of harmful algal blooms (HABs) caused by excessive pesticides, fertilizers, and other pollutants flowing into the water from tributaries and nearby lands. One pound of phosphorous can stimulate the growth of 1,100 pounds of algae in a lake or pond,” according to thewatershed.org.

Last year, the staff and scientists at the Watershed Institute dropped the first of 20 floating wetlands into the waters in an innovative approach to halt toxic algae blooms and improve water quality.

Instead of using chemicals, the large floating wetlands were planted with fast-growing grasses, swamp milkweed, and cardinal flowers. These hardy, long-rooted plants will soak up nitrogen, phosphorus and other nutrients that stimulate the growth of blue-green algae, posing health threats for people, pets, and other animals, according to the institute’s website. The Watershed is monitoring the lake regularly to determine the effectiveness of the floating wetlands.

Other conventional methods to prevent algal blooms include aeration, chemical/biological additives, or ultrasonic technology. The treatment solutions that are available on the market, they all have their cons.

It appears that preventing the algal bloom in the first place is the way to go. The Watershed and the NJ DEP have plenty of suggestions that communities can take to protect the waterways from pollution. ?

The NJ DEP’s HAB website, at www.state.nj.us/dep/hab contains general information about cyanobacterial HABs, what to do if people or pets are exposed, links to the EPA and U.S. Centers for Disease Control’s HABs websites.

Manville, South Brunswick and Princeton share this important goal

Manville and South Brunswick have little in common.Manville is a working-class town in Somerset County, and South Brunswick is a thriving suburb in the Route 1 corridor in Middlesex County near Princeton.Yet the two municipalities share an important goal: they – and other towns – want the state to find a solution to flooding in the 238-square-mile Millstone River Basin.The Millstone River has its headwaters in Millstone Township in Monmouth County, and it meanders through northern Mercer County...

Manville and South Brunswick have little in common.

Manville is a working-class town in Somerset County, and South Brunswick is a thriving suburb in the Route 1 corridor in Middlesex County near Princeton.

Yet the two municipalities share an important goal: they – and other towns – want the state to find a solution to flooding in the 238-square-mile Millstone River Basin.

The Millstone River has its headwaters in Millstone Township in Monmouth County, and it meanders through northern Mercer County near Princeton, then north through Somerset County to its confluence with the Raritan River.

Most of the year the Millstone is a ribbon of tranquility through rapidly developing Central Jersey. But then there are days, like Sept. 1, 2021, when the river becomes a raging torrent, threatening communities along its banks, particularly Manville that has suffered periodic devastating floods dating back to 1971.

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers is aware of the problem, saying that rapid development in the watershed is increasing runoff potential and flooding hazards. Many areas that historically have not seen flooding are now reporting damage during severe rainfall events, such as the remnants from Hurricane Ida last year.

The runoff from residential, office and retail development in the Route 1 corridor eventually ends up in Manville.

But in 2016, the Army Corps of Engineers released a report saying that it would not undertake a comprehensive flood control project in the watershed. The report concluded the benefit-to-cost ratio did not justify a flood control project like the one still under construction in the nearby Green Brook basin.

The reaction from Manville residents was understandable and predictable.

"You're the Army Corps of Idiots," Bob Kaminski, a resident of Manville's Lost Valley neighborhood, told representatives of the government organization at a community meeting where the report was unveiled.

"This is a man-made problem," Manville Mayor Rich Onderko said at the meeting. "There should be a man-made solution."

Now other towns besides Manville are recognizing that something must be done.

South Brunswick, like Manville, recently approved a resolution calling on the state to seek a regional solution to the flooding. The resolution also calls on other towns in the watershed to support the call for action.

In its resolution, South Brunswick says flooding "impacts not only our own residents and businesses, but limits access to regional transportation at Princeton Junction Train Station on the Northeast Corridor and to major state arteries such as U.S. Route 1" and creates public health and safety issues "that severely stretch our First Responders, and have resulted in injury and death in the region, far outweighing the direct economic impacts."

Princeton has also passed a resolution, saying "even less storms tax our storm sewer stream and cause our streams to overflow their banks."

The resolution says the flooding is "a multi-county regional problem that cannot be alleviated by independent action of any one municipality."

Neighboring West Windsor has also adopted the resolution.

The resolutions also ask all towns in the watershed to ask the state to take action.

Email: [email protected]

Susan Loyer covers Middlesex County and more for MyCentralJersey.com. To get unlimited access to her work, please subscribe or activate your digital account today.

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