BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Loch Arbour

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Loch Arbour, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Loch Arbour, NJ
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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Basement Leak Repair Loch Arbour, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Loch Arbour, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Loch Arbour

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Loch Arbour:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Loch Arbour, NJ

Latest News in Loch Arbour, NJ

New Jerseyans reveal their favorite beaches — then and now

This is not about one of those meaningless, random national surveys; The kind that names the town with the best beach, when they really don't have the best beach, they're just a really cool town with other great attributes.No, this is about REAL lifelong New Jersey residents sharing their opinion on their go-to beach town.Most of us grow up going to one beach for most of our childhood. Whether it's just day trips with the family or that glorious weeklong stay at a motel or beach house. The real lucky ones got to stay at "t...

This is not about one of those meaningless, random national surveys; The kind that names the town with the best beach, when they really don't have the best beach, they're just a really cool town with other great attributes.

No, this is about REAL lifelong New Jersey residents sharing their opinion on their go-to beach town.

Most of us grow up going to one beach for most of our childhood. Whether it's just day trips with the family or that glorious weeklong stay at a motel or beach house. The real lucky ones got to stay at "the shore" for the whole summer.

When you're old enough to drive to the shore or the beach, you probably pick another town with a more edgy vibe. Think your Wildwoods, Seaside Heights, Atlantic City, Point Pleasant maybe.

Then if you raise a family, you switch to a more family-friendly town like Ocean City, Manasquan, Spring Lake or Cape May.

Life in New Jersey seems to have three or four stages of your beach preference. Not so fast. We found that some people have one town and only one town that means "going down the shore" for their whole life.

Here is some of what we heard.

One caller grew up going to Spring Lake, now visits Seaside Park.

Then we heard from someone who grew up frequenting Point Pleasant, before spending their teenage years in Asbury Park, and later Lavallette.

Other beach preference changes included:

We also heard from a few callers who made the switch but couldn't stay away from the place that made them all in love with the shore in the first place.

One caller grew up going to Avalon, before migrating to Mantoloking. Now they're back in Avalon.

Soon after we heard from a woman who was taken to Manasquan as a child, but switched it up by going to Sea Girt in her teens. Now she prefers the place where it all started, Manasquan.

Just to throw a fly in the ointment of my "three or four stages of beach preference" theory, we then heard from people who decided to make Sea Isle City, Asbury Park, and Brick Beach their lifelong shore destinations.

It's interesting to see how shore town preferences change over a lifetime and for some it doesn't. Some of it has to do with geography. Whatever town is a straight-line due east of you is where your family took you and where you're most comfortable.

I've been fortunate enough to have visited every shore town in New Jersey. The best part is they all have distinct personalities, even though some of them are right next to each other.

Asbury Park, Loch Arbour, Allenhurst, and Deal come to mind.

This summer close your eyes and put your finger on the map of the Jersey Shore, then go to the town you land on. You will thank me.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

You can now listen to Dennis & Judi — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite best friends anytime, anywhere and any day of the week. Download the Dennis & Judi show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

Moving site says people are still fleeing New Jersey

Take it for what it’s worth, as a lot of the data come from internet searches, but, according to a moving website, MoveBuddha, more people are leaving New Jersey than are moving in.I know what you’re saying, “Didn’t we gain population in the last census?” and, yes, we did.That was fueled by an increase in the number of foreign born residents; when it comes to moving trends d...

Take it for what it’s worth, as a lot of the data come from internet searches, but, according to a moving website, MoveBuddha, more people are leaving New Jersey than are moving in.

I know what you’re saying, “Didn’t we gain population in the last census?” and, yes, we did.

That was fueled by an increase in the number of foreign born residents; when it comes to moving trends domestically, we have more people moving to other states than people from other states moving in.

New Jersey is fourth when it comes to residents leaving for other states.

MoveBuddha.com analyzed 240 thousand search queries about interstate moves, and by that metric, New Jersey is the worst. Three times more people are looking to move out than move in. In Trenton alone, there are twice as many searches for outbound moves than there are for inbound.

The survey also addresses where ex-New Jerseyans (and their money) go; Florida is the #1 destination for people fleeing the state. New Jersey also lost more income to Florida than any other state.

Interestingly, while California and Texas are second and third for most moves, when it comes to lost income, New York and Pennsylvania are numbers 2 and 3, indicating some wealthier departees want to stay close to the Garden State.

MoveBuddha says that the single most popular destination for exiting New Jerseyans is Naples, Florida, followed by Seattle, Los Angeles, Miami, Tampa, Dallas, Austin, TX, NYC, Jacksonville, FL, and Atlanta, GA.

The study also examines population declines in New Jersey’s big, medium, and small cities and can be found here.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Bill Doyle only.

You can now listen to Deminski & Doyle — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite afternoon radio show any day of the week. Download the Deminski & Doyle show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

New Jersey's smallest towns by population

New Jersey's least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.

Gallery Credit: Michael Symons

#20: Rocky Hill

Population 743 … The population of the Somerset County borough grew by 61 people, 9%, between the 2010 and 2020 censuses, pushing it out of the 20 smallest towns in New Jersey … until the dissolution of Pine Valley pulled it back onto the list.

#18: Washington Township

Population 693 … The Washington Township in Burlington County is the smallest of the six Washingtons in New Jersey – five townships and one borough. All told, more than 90,000 people live in those Washingtons combined.

#16: Andover

#15: West Wildwood

Population 540 … There are 12,419 residents if you combine Wildwood, Wildwood Crest, North Wildwood and West Wildwood – but this Cape May County borough is the smallest of them.

#13: Stockton

#12: Allenhurst

#11: Corbin City

#7: Harvey Cedars

Population 391 … The borough is the smallest of the six municipalities that make up Long Beach Island in Ocean County. All told, the census counts 7,552 full-time residents of LBI – but of course, far more in the summer.

#6: Mantoloking

#5: Cape May Point

Population 305 … The borough is at the tip of the peninsula in Cape May County, the southernmost point in the state. Most of the residences are vacation homes.

#4: Loch Arbour

#3: Teterboro

#2: Tavistock

#1: Walpack

Population 7 … The Sussex County township’s population peaked 160 years ago at 851. It was 384 as recently as 1970 but now is the smallest in the state, after the federal government claimed the land through eminent domain for a dam project that was never built – now the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

Nasty NJ town nicknames — Have you heard of them?

Dennis & Judi asked their listeners for the nasty nicknames they've heard their towns referred to. How many have you heard? Which ones would you add?

How to get from Monmouth/Ocean to the Holland Tunnel without paying tolls

Sometimes even your GPS doesn't know the back way to certain places.

You're going to want to utilize Route 9 north, so if you live anywhere below Sayreville, try to navigate your way there.

Route 9 is known for being a bit of a headache during commuting hours, so the closer to Old Bridge to hop on, the better. Once you are near the Route 18 interchange, Route 9 becomes a 3 lane road, which is much easier to navigate. Routes 34 and Route 35 may also come in handy here.

Once you get on the Parkway, you'll be just a few miles from the Driscoll Bridge. It's shocking there isn't a fatal accident on this bridge every single day.

As you cross the Driscoll, you'll start seeing signs for the New Jersey Turnpike. Go ahead and give the middle finger to the entrance and continue northbound on the Parkway.

The price to drive the Turnpike from Exit 11: The Garden State Parkway to the Holland Tunnel is $7.40. For commuters, it's the same going back. Imagine paying $14.80 per day to drive 20 miles each way? No thanks.

Continue along the Parkway until you reach Exit 140, US 22 / Route 82 East (Hillside). You've now successfully dodged all Parkway tolls, exiting about 4 miles before the Union toll plaza.

Follow signs for US 22 East. Stay in the middle lane as it gets a bit confusing for the uninitiated. There are also a ton of fast food options and gas stations on this route, by the way.

As you cruise along, you'll notice the back of Newark Airport to your right. Congratulations! You also just figured out how to get to the Newark Airport without paying a toll. It’s warranted: Give the airport the middle finger too. You're beating the system ... and Newark Airport stinks.

Back to focusing on the road. Before you know it, you're on the Pulaski Skyway, one of the ugliest and most neglected roadways in North America.

Soon enough you'll be in Jersey City. You will want to remain in the left lane, as 1-9 veers off to the right, and the road you're on becomes Route 139 East. The sign will say Hoboken / Holland Tunnel.

The lane situation is absolute chaos. You've got two three-lane roads separated by a divider eventually merging into one six-lane road where people are doing the Jersey Slide like it’s 1978. Straight ahead is the Holland Tunnel.

*The Jersey Slide is a driving maneuver, common in NJ, where you travel from the farthest lane all the way to the other side in one quick motion to make a turn. Other variations include getting on the highway and immediately crossing the lanes of traffic necessary to get in the left lane as soon as possible.

The 10 best New Jersey sports bars to watch Giants games

We didn’t need an excuse to drink and watch sports at the bar, but now we definitely have one. For the first time in years, the New York Giants are ... good?The G-Men are arguably the biggest surprise in the NFL after a 5-1 start under new coach Brian Daboll. With back-to-back wins over th...

We didn’t need an excuse to drink and watch sports at the bar, but now we definitely have one. For the first time in years, the New York Giants are ... good?

The G-Men are arguably the biggest surprise in the NFL after a 5-1 start under new coach Brian Daboll. With back-to-back wins over the Green Bay Packers and Baltimore Ravens, the playoffs are seriously in play for the team that hasn’t made the postseason since 2016.

So we’re definitely watching. But where? There’s no place better to watch football than at a sports bar surrounded by televisions, fellow friends, booze and lots of food. And it should come as no surprise that New Jersey is loaded with great sports bars.

Here are the 10 best sports bars to watch the Giants:

Obal’s Inn, Bloomfield

COVID-19 nearly wiped this Essex County haunt out, but the community rallied around Broad Street dive bar and thankfully it’s still open and serving some of the state’s best ribs. There are plenty of TVs, pool and shuffleboard in the back room for some halftime entertainment. They have a strong selection of beers on tap. But don’t overthink it, they have the crispest Yuengling you’ll find this side of the Hudson. Obal’s don’t serve their vaunted ribs on the weekend — but the wings, burgers and bar pies more than make up for it.

Redd’s Restaurant & Bar, Carlstadt

Want to be as close to the game as possible without actually attending? Redd’s is a mile from MetLife — so close you’ll basically be able to hear the cheers (or boos) during the game while you drink by the liter and munch on pizza and burgers. Or if you want to actually go to the game, Redd’s offers shuttle service to the stadium.

The Clif Tavern, Clifton

The Clif was built in the 1800s but is now a sizable bar with plenty of TVs, a gorgeous pool table and some very inventive eats. You can mix any two types of wing sauces — garlic parmesan and lemon pepper is a winning combo. The Sunday drink deals are a draw on their own — who doesn’t love three buck domestic bottles!

Black Bear Bar & Grill, Hoboken

The No. 1 sports bar in New Jersey on NJ.com’s list, you’ll find no shortage of televisions at Black Bear Bar & Grill — they have more than 50 of them. The bar is celebrating its 25th year of serving Hoboken bites, booze and football in 2022, the buffalo chicken quesadilla, Hoboken burger with egg and Taylor ham and homemade mac n’ cheese are all terrific.

Lucky 7 Tavern, Jersey City

There are drinking holes with more televisions and more expansive menus throughout Jersey City. Good for them! None of them have the divey charm of Lucky’s, which is covered in stickers, flyers and graffiti. It came in at No. 3 in NJ.com’s Jersey City bar rankings for good reason. Football specials include delicious bloody marys for five dollars, one dollar hot dogs and divine breakfast totchos. Yes, breakfast totchos. Eggs, cheese, sour cream and jalapeños atop tater tots. Thank me later.

Deal Lake Bar + Co., Loch Arbour

Asbury Park’s bar and restaurant scene gets plenty of attention, but venture a little north and you’ll land at one of the best sports bars in the state right on Deal Lake. Plenty of TVs for pigskin, Deal Lake Bar + Co also has plenty of meal deals — cheesesteak egg rolls and fried cheese curds are guaranteed winners, as are $6 High Noons.

Jack’s Goal Line Stand, Long Branch

With more than 50 TVs throughout three different bar areas, arcade and classic games in the back and more than 60 beers on tap, even if the Giants don’t win you’re assured to have a good time at Jack’s. The ribs and wings are revered, as well. This building opened as a hostel in 1874 but has been renovated into one of the state’s best bars.

Frenchy’s Sports Bar & Grill, Roselle Park

New sports bars open all the time. How many from 1964 are still around? A beloved Union County bar, Frenchy’s is a great spot for no frills football fun. Watch the Giants win while munching on their excellent bar pies and wings. The divey, low-key atmosphere is a ton of fun, even if football isn’t on — it was No. 3 on NJ.com’s list of best sports bars.

Miracle Sports Pub, Toms River

The Giants having a good season is a miracle, so why not celebrate at the Miracle Sports Pub? A long and narrow bar that can get rowdy (in a good way) during Giants games, it was No. 10 on NJ.com’s list of best sports bars. Part of that was for the atmosphere, and part of that was for the grub — including breakfast options like breakfast flatbreads with eggs and pork roll.

Zagursky’s Bar & Grill, Whippany

It doesn’t look like much, Zagursky’s is just an unassuming tan building with an old fashioned sign above its door. But once you’re in there are plenty of TVs football, diehard fans and delicious bar pies and burgers. The place has been open for more than 70 years, and you can feel that history as soon as you walk in.

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10 years after Superstorm Sandy: What’s Been Done and the Road Ahead

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, quickly sprang into action in the days following Superstorm Sandy. Recovery was at the heart of disaster response following the hundred-year storm to which many resources and expertise were contributed. Collaboration with its many partners was critical to the Corps mission and having a clear understanding of roles and responsibilities. For the past 10 years, The New York District's performance during the Sandy response and recovery operations highlights this progress.When disasters ...

The U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, New York District, quickly sprang into action in the days following Superstorm Sandy. Recovery was at the heart of disaster response following the hundred-year storm to which many resources and expertise were contributed. Collaboration with its many partners was critical to the Corps mission and having a clear understanding of roles and responsibilities. For the past 10 years, The New York District's performance during the Sandy response and recovery operations highlights this progress.

When disasters occur, U.S. Army Corps of Engineers teams and other resources are mobilized from across the country to execute response missions. Building on the Corps' experiences from Sandy, New York District has continued its efforts to respond to catastrophic events.

There have been many occasions where partnerships have been critical to project successes. Commitment and collaboration among the Corps and its valued partners combined strengths led to project success.

“Superstorm Sandy was a game-changer in every way, but the response from USACE and our partners at the federal, state, and local levels has also been unprecedented,” said COL Matthew Luzzatto, commander, New York District. “We were on the ground directly after the storm hit and have continued to work diligently within these communities to build comprehensive, long-term solutions. Our commitment to solving the Nation’s toughest engineering challenges remains strong and I look forward to working in collaboration with all of our partners as we continue to execute these vital coastal storm risk reduction projects.”

In the ten years since Hurricane Sandy, New York District has completed several projects, begun new feasibility studies and made visible progress across the region with coastal restoration completed at critical areas along the New Jersey and New York shoreline.

The District has built momentum to further enhance areas of resiliency and reducing risks from future coastal storms.

Long Beach, New York ($125M) – Construction of this project included 4 new groins and the rehabilitation of 18 existing groins, installing 284,000 tons of rock, and widening the beach with 4.1 million cubic yards to reinforce sand dunes, which play a crucial role in flood risk reduction. The project was completed in March 2020.

Downtown Montauk, New York ($15M) – This coastal storm risk reduction project was fast-tracked to provide protection for commercial businesses directly impacted by Superstorm Sandy and make them more resilient against future storms. This effort involved dune reinforcement along 3,100 ft of shoreline in an effort to provide additional measures against coastal storms. Construction was completed in May 2016.

Coney Island, New York ($33M) – This project included the construction of 4 new T-groin structures and placement of 70,000 cubic yards of sand in Sea Gate to protect the integrity of the existing coastal storm risk reduction project at Coney Island that reduces risk to the residents of the adjacent communities. The project was completed in June 2016.

Fire Island to Moriches Inlet, New York ($291M) – New York District placed over 7 million cubic yards of sand along the shores of Long Island to increase resiliency while also incorporating a series of house relocations into its design in Davis Park to make way for a line of protective dunes. All coastal storm risk management features (beach and dunes) were completed in June 2020.

Elberon to Loch Arbor, New Jersey ($155M) - New York District used technical expertise and cutting-edge innovation to complete the three-mile Elberon to Loch Arbour reach portion of the Sandy Hook to Barnegat Inlet, NJ project. The erosion control project included 4.4 million cubic yards of sand placement beach fill, modification of existing outfalls and modification of an existing groin. Construction was completed in October 2018.

“I’m extremely proud to be a part of the Sandy Recovery mission,” said Anthony Ciorra, chief, coastal restoration, and special project branch at New York District. “Everyone at all levels of government has worked so hard, but our success is due to the dedicated professionals working on these projects, day in and day out. It hasn’t always been easy, but we have had so many major successes in the ten years since Sandy.”

Another success following Sandy according to Ciorra was the formation of the Federal Leadership Resilience Collaborative. A group of federal representatives from agencies including the Army Corps of Engineers, the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), the Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) and the Department of Transportation (DOT) that meets quarterly to leverage resources, minimize overlap and discuss disaster prevention, and recovery efforts for New York and New Jersey’s communities. This model of collaboration is being looked at and incorporated at other locations around the U.S. to protect vulnerable communities from 100-year storms such as Sandy.

New York District is currently in the midst of executing a Superstorm Sandy Coastal Storm Risk Reduction program funded under Public Law 113-2, the Emergency Supplemental Bill passed shortly after Superstorm Sandy. This $6B comprehensive portfolio required repair and restoration of 8 existing projects–most of which were substantially completed by December 2014—less than 18 months after construction began in July 2013 at a cost of $242M. Over 15.2 million cubic yards of sand was placed on beaches for projects in New York City, Long Island, and Northern New Jersey. Another $158M effort saw the District repair 29 federally maintained navigation projects for channels and structures impacted by Hurricane Sandy.

“Sandy was a wake-up call for us, but we are better prepared today,” said Ciorra. “The 10-year anniversary is a great time to reflect on our success, but more work needs to be done to reduce our vulnerabilities and we can’t take our foot off the gas.”

Nine additional projects were authorized through the Superstorm Sandy Supplemental Bill, six of which are currently in progress.

Rockaway, New York ($702M) - New York District is currently working on a comprehensive coastal storm risk reduction project that includes construction of a reinforced steel sheet pile dune, new and extended groins with beach restoration, and re-nourishment along the Atlantic Ocean shorefront. New York District is also working on a nature-based plan with structural features to be constructed on the Jamaica Bay shoreline to address coastal storm surge flooding. Two construction contracts totaling $340 million are ongoing along the shorefront until early 2026 while design work continues on the Jamaica Bay features with construction scheduled to start in 2025.

Fire Island to Montauk Point, New York ($1.8B) - New York District also continues to make good progress along the coastline of Long Island, specifically the south shore, using a series of solutions including the development of a breach response plan, home elevations, flood-proofing & acquisitions, coastal restoration, preserving natural resources, and adapting to sea level rise to provide additional flood risk reduction measures for approximately 83 miles of coastline when complete. Construction on the first two coastal restoration contracts is underway while design continues on the nonstructural features with the first series of home elevations scheduled to start by late 2024.

Montauk Point Lighthouse, New York ($44M) - In addition to its Fire Island to Montauk Point Project, New York District is also working on a project designed to protect the Montauk Point Lighthouse—a National Historical Landmark that was commissioned by President George Washington and built in 1796. The existing stone revetment that protects the bluff adjacent to the lighthouse is undergoing an upgrade to portions of its structure to increase resiliency due to the close proximity of the lighthouse to the ocean, ensuring it remains a beacon for everyone to see for years to come. Construction of the new stone revetment started in March 2021 and is expected to be completed by early 2023.

Minish Park, New Jersey ($72M) - New York District just completed the first phase of a coastal storm risk reduction project that will have the added benefit of helping revitalize a former industrial area along the Lower Passaic River in the downtown area of Newark, N.J. The first phase involved construction of 6,000 feet of new bulkhead, 3,200 feet of restored riverbank and creation of wetlands. Additional phases of the project will see construction of a 9,200-foot waterfront walkway as well as park facilities, plazas, and landscaping. The most recent contract was completed in July 2021 with two more construction contracts scheduled for award in 2023 and 2024, respectively.

Port Monmouth, New Jersey ($265M) – New York District is in the midst of executing several contracts designed to construct a comprehensive coastal storm risk reduction project in Port Monmouth using a series of levees, floodwalls, tide gates, pump stations, terminal groins, dunes, and beach nourishment to increase resiliency for the residents of these communities. Four construction contracts have been completed with another recently awarded and two more scheduled for award in 2023.

Union Beach Coastal Storm Risk Reduction Project, New Jersey ($382M) – New York District will begin construction in Spring 2023 on a coastal storm risk reduction project in Union Beach that includes a series of levees, floodwalls, pump stations, tide gates, terminal groins, dunes, and beach nourishment to increase resiliency for these communities. This area suffered extensive damage to the Raritan Bay coastline, widespread power outages & flooding, extensive damage to residential, commercial, and public property. The first contract was recently awarded and will include the construction of two terminal stone groins, a beach berm, and dunes.

Additional projects involving the South Shore of Staten Island in New York, and Passaic River Tidal Protection Area in New Jersey are also expected to begin construction shortly. New York District also recently released its findings concerning the NY/NJ Harbor and Tributaries Study, which is expected to provide additional coastal storm risk reduction options for at risk communities throughout New York City and the surrounding areas in the harbor estuary.

New Fort Monmouth Sports Bar With Virtual Golf, Fire Pit On Its Way

The owners of Deal Lake Bar + Co. in Loch Arbor are planning to open Baseline Social, a new sports bar, at Fort Monmouth in Oceanport.(Culture Collective/Denholtz Properties)(Culture Collective/Denholtz Properties)OCEANPORT, NJ — Not only did the first-ever brewery open at Fort Monmouth earlier this October (Birdsmouth Beer, which opened Oct. 15), but a massive new sports bar...

The owners of Deal Lake Bar + Co. in Loch Arbor are planning to open Baseline Social, a new sports bar, at Fort Monmouth in Oceanport.

(Culture Collective/Denholtz Properties)

(Culture Collective/Denholtz Properties)

OCEANPORT, NJ — Not only did the first-ever brewery open at Fort Monmouth earlier this October (Birdsmouth Beer, which opened Oct. 15), but a massive new sports bar and restaurant is now slated to open there as well.

The sports bar will be called Baseline Social; renderings of how it will look are above. Construction on the bar is underway now and it is not scheduled to open until the spring of 2023; an exact month is not yet known.

Both the brewery and the sports bar are located at The Commissary at Baseline, which was the old grocery store when Fort Monmouth was an active Army base.The Commissary is located at 675 Oceanport Way in Oceanport.

Baseline Social is owned by Andrea Pappas, Greg Bartz and Phil Villapiano, the owners of Deal Lake Bar + Co, an American-style bar/restaurant with three open bars and a large outdoor dining area in nearby Loch Harbor.

The trio of Monmouth County restaurateurs they wanted to bring that same kind of atmosphere to the old Fort Monmouth Army base.

The sports bar will bring a "one-of-a-kind immersive dining and entertainment experience to Fort Monmouth" with an "expansive LED viewing wall perfect for watching the game" and a 38-seat platform lounge.

Baseline Social is not just for watching sports: The bar will have five virtual golf bays with full-swing technology will enable guests to play a variety of sports and games.

There will also be an outdoor fire pit lounge for three-season access, with infrared heaters.

The brewery is located inside, as is MGT Foods, a third-generation family-owned business that relocated there from Keyport this fall. MGT is the maker of food brands such as Mr. Green Tea Ice Cream, Mr. Mochi, The Bear & The Rat Cool Treats for Dogs and Eat Mud Non-Dairy Ice Cream.

Baseline Social will be the third and final tenant of that space.

The Commissary is owned by Red Bank-based commercial real estate developer Denholtz Properties, which plans to next move forward with its redevelopment of the former Fort Monmouth Warehouse District: 2,400 square feet of modern spec industrial/flex space spread across three buildings.

Fort Monmouth development boom well underway: New Fort Monmouth Craft Brewery Will Open This Saturday

Developer Ralph Zucker, who owns Bell Works in Holmdel, wants to build luxury condos at Fort Monmouth and add a waterfront walkway.

The area of the fort where the officers used to live, a stately row of brick homes called Officers' Row has been turned into luxury houses for sale, with prices starting in the $700,000s.

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