BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Jackson Township

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Jackson Township, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Jackson Township, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Jackson Township, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Jackson Township, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Jackson Township, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Jackson Township

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Jackson Township:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Jackson Township, NJ

Latest News in Jackson Township, NJ

‘No apology’ for cross shape for rebuilt Jersey Shore pier, religious group says

The Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association is defending the design of a new pier it plans to build in the Jersey Shore community, despite backlash from some residents who say the structure too closely resembles a Christian cross on a public beach.The religious nonprofit organization’s chief operating officer, Jamie Jackson, said the group makes “no apology for tha...

The Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association is defending the design of a new pier it plans to build in the Jersey Shore community, despite backlash from some residents who say the structure too closely resembles a Christian cross on a public beach.

The religious nonprofit organization’s chief operating officer, Jamie Jackson, said the group makes “no apology for that we love the fact that it looks like a cross.”

When asked if Jackson’s statement meant the beach pier was, in fact, intentionally designed to look like a Christian cross, Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association President Michael Badger said only, “it did not escape our notice.”

“The symbolism is in cooperation with its effective use,” he said. “Different people will see different things. What the importance of it is, kind of (depends on) your perspective.

“It is obvious to many people what the shape is,” Badger said.

The Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association, a Methodist ministry, is using $1.3 million of its funds and donated money to build the pier and other beachfront facilities.

Under a complex charter, the association has authority over the land, beach and boardwalk in Ocean Grove, which is a small seaside section of Neptune Township in Monmouth County.

The new pier, which will be open to the public, did not need to go through local officials for approval. However, some residents who view the design as “Christian bullying” have asked state and local officials to intervene.

The architectural firm for the project, Leon S. Avakian Engineers, did not respond to multiple requests to comment on whether the pier was intentionally designed to be a religious symbol or if it just has a cross design similar to piers in Coney Island and other Shore communities.

Badger said the Camp Meeting Association never intended for the pier to offend or exclude anyone. He also denied the pier had anything to do with Christian nationalism, a term used to describe efforts to put Christian symbols and practices into public spaces.

“There was no idea that this could be perceived as Christian nationalism,” said Badger. “It’s not a part of who the camp meeting association is.”

Christian nationalism is often used to describe the belief that the U.S. was established as an explicitly Christian nation, and that this close relationship with Christianity must be protected, according to research by Joseph Williams, an associate professor of religion at Rutgers University.

“The practical ramifications of such views involve everything from support for laws that codify specific interpretations of Christian morality, to the defense of religious displays on public property, to nativist reactions to non-white, non-Christian immigrants,” Williams told a Rutgers University publication.

The new cross-shaped pier design was unveiled last month at a groundbreaking, drawing criticism from some local officials and members of the LGBTQ+ community. The pier will replace one that was damaged a decade ago during Hurricane Sandy and never replaced.

Christian symbols can already be found all around Ocean Grove.

Beach badges sold by the camp meeting association include a cross, beach umbrellas available for rent are decorated with cross iconography and there’s a cross mounted on the dunes at the beach. When visitors enter Ocean Grove, they are greeted by a sign that reads, “Welcome to Ocean Grove, a Christian seaside resort.”

The pier is just another version of the ‘”holier than thou’ kind of bullying we’re all familiar with here in what some call ‘God’s square mile,’” wrote Ocean Grove resident Doug Grote in an op-ed this week.

“To me, any political power that would appear to bully its captive, vulnerable, secular citizenry into accepting a sectarian cross as the center of its cultural life is a likely human rights violator,” said Grote, a semi-retired Presbyterian pastor. “With the pier’s construction set to begin soon, I fear that my faith’s lovely cross may soon become as toxic as a Trojan horse for Ocean Grove, Asbury Park, and all of New Jersey.”

Grote has the option of bringing a motion to the floor at the next Ocean Grove Home Owners Association meeting on Sept. 17, where he can request a vote on asking the camp meeting association to halt construction of the pier “until matters are investigated, all of its citizenry are consulted, and approve the cross-shaped pier, or not, just like democracy ought to work.”

The Ocean Grove Home Owner’s Association is not affiliated with the Camp Meeting Association and its members include a mix of residents.

If Grote or another resident present a motion and it is successful, the Home Owner’s Association will relay the results to the Camp Meeting Association and urge them to hold off on construction.

“However, OGHOA is not part of the Camp Meeting, and the Camp Meeting is not likely to be swayed by a vote of the members of OGHOA, no matter how decisive,” Joyce Klein, vice-president of the Home Owners Association, said in an email shared with NJ Advance Media.

Construction on the pier is scheduled to begin next month, a week before the Home Owner’s Association meeting.

That’s why Grote and resident Shane Martins are also calling on elected officials to step in.

“For too long, Badger and Jackson’s decision affecting our community have gone unchecked. It is time for our leaders, who are actually elected, to get involved to ensure that the protections afforded to us under the 1st Amendment to the U.S Constitution are not violated,” Martins said.

Not all residents are opposed to the pier project. Some say they don’t mind the design, some embrace the cross symbolism and others are simply happy to see the pier being rebuilt.

“I believe most of (us) here, religious or not, are just profoundly happy that the pier many of us visit daily will soon be made better than before,” said Ocean Grove resident Charlotte Pritchard.

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Habitat breaks ground in Marmora

Single mom: ‘This is such a blessing’MARMORA — Chelsea and Jackson soon will have a home to call their own thanks to Habitat for Humanity Cape May County, which broke ground on its 20th new house Aug. 25 at 104 E. Ocean Ave.Gathering with the soon-to-be homeowners were officials of the organization and many of its volunteers, who not only build but also operate its home improvement ReStore at 20 Court House-South Dennis Road.“This is possible because all of you believe in what we do,” Exec...

Single mom: ‘This is such a blessing’

MARMORA — Chelsea and Jackson soon will have a home to call their own thanks to Habitat for Humanity Cape May County, which broke ground on its 20th new house Aug. 25 at 104 E. Ocean Ave.

Gathering with the soon-to-be homeowners were officials of the organization and many of its volunteers, who not only build but also operate its home improvement ReStore at 20 Court House-South Dennis Road.

“This is possible because all of you believe in what we do,” Executive Director Sarah Matthews told the gathered crowd, citing the “generosity of Upper Township” in granting the property and three others — one just across the street where its next build will take place.

Both sites have been cleared and one awaits a date with a backhoe. Matthews said a modular home is expected to be delivered in about a month. In the meantime, the foundation will be built and utilities prepared for connection.

Matthews talked about the families who can’t find affordable rentals and are forced to spend an exorbitant amount of their income on housing, leaving them struggling to pay for food, utilities and health care.

“Today we have one less family to have to worry about,” she said.

“This is such a blessing,” single mother Chelsea Berkey said, standing at the podium with Jackson, a rising fourth-grader at Upper Township Primary School. “We are overwhelmed and excited.”

Berkey said her mother has been involved with Habitat for Humanity, never expecting her daughter would one day benefit from its efforts to provide affordable housing and foster homeownership.

Berkey, who grew up in South Dennis and attended Middle Township High School, said a series of misfortunes set her back financially.

“When COVID hit, it really hit us hard. I was laid off from my corporate job in which I was able to make ends meet on a single income. They eliminated my position,” Berkey said. “Just after that, Jackson was diagnosed with type 1 diabetes, which is an extremely difficult and expensive disease to manage.”

Berkey said she and her son have been living in a small rental but the rent has more than doubled since 2020. She said getting a home means she won’t have to deal with the high cost of rent and will be able to raise her son in the county where her five siblings live.

“We can actually take pride that this is our house and we get to take care of it, and stay in the community that I grew up in,” she said, noting Jackson was born in California but she moved back to Cape May County to raise him here.

“We really thought we were going to have to move out of New Jersey altogether,” she said. “It would have been really hard because we would have been moving away from not only our family and friends but his medical care team as well.”

She is excited to plant a garden and live in a neighborhood where her son has friends and can ride his bike around safely.

Representing the Cape May County Board of Commissioners, E. Marie Hayes presented the family with a proclamation.

“Thank you to all of the volunteers who make this all happen,” Hayes said.

Now that ground has been broken in a ceremonial shoveling, “this is when finally the rubber meets the road,” Matthews said, calling it a great milestone for the organization.

West Cape May resident Dave Hammond, president of the board, said the home would be Habitat Cape May County’s first modular.

“We’ve been kicking it around for several years and decided to see how it worked, whether the time was quicker and we could build more houses, whether it was cheaper or about the same amount of money. This is an experiment,” he said.

Modular homes are built in a warehouse and shipped to the site, where the two halves are joined, meaning the organization would be paying for labor. Hammond said some Habitat chapters build exclusively modular and that there certainly are some advantages. Whether it would be quicker remains in question, though, since he said they ordered the home in February and it is yet to be delivered.

“We want to keep moving as fast as possible because there is such a need, and for us to make a dent we need to be building and then building again,” Matthews said, noting they now have the ability to “keep rolling into the next one” now that a third party is providing mortgages.

The new home at 104 E. Ocean Ave. is perhaps several months away from completion. Matthews said the foundation will be built soon and the home should be delivered in September.

“We’ve got enough work in the modular for volunteers,” she said, noting they will need help with flooring, trim, painting, siding and building decks.

Matthews said she is hoping for completion before Thanksgiving and certainly before the end of the year.

Hammond said the home across the street would be stick-built because it is going to be ADA-compliant.

“It’s going to be kind of a special thing. We are looking forward to doing it with a roll-in shower and things,” he said.

By CRAIG D. SCHENCK/Sentinel staff

Men's Cross Country Season Preview

LEXINGTON, Va. – The Washington and Lee Men's Cross Country team, receiving votes in the national poll and predicted fourth in the region, opens the 2022 season on Thursday afternoon.Head Coach Brandon Spalding, heading into his tenth season leading the Generals, will have 18 men toeing the starting line in Blue and White. New faces on the squad include three first-year student-athletes and a graduate student.USTFCCCA NATIONAL POLLThe Blue and White make an appearance in the 2022 USTFCCCA Preseason Coaches Poll, ...

LEXINGTON, Va. – The Washington and Lee Men's Cross Country team, receiving votes in the national poll and predicted fourth in the region, opens the 2022 season on Thursday afternoon.

Head Coach Brandon Spalding, heading into his tenth season leading the Generals, will have 18 men toeing the starting line in Blue and White. New faces on the squad include three first-year student-athletes and a graduate student.

USTFCCCA NATIONAL POLL

The Blue and White make an appearance in the 2022 USTFCCCA Preseason Coaches Poll, receiving votes nationally and are slated in the four-spot for the South Region.

Nationally, two-time defending champion Pomona-Pitzer is a near unanimous favorite to three-peat in Michigan this November. The Sagehens aim to become just the third program in meet history to win three consecutive national titles, joining North Central (Ill.) and UW-Oshkosh are the others.

Lynchburg, the 2022 ODAC title winners, were voted No. 11 with 243 points and atop the South Region Coaches' Rankings. No. 20 Emory, the defending regional champion, is picked No. 2 and both squads return their entire top-7 from last year.

Christopher Newport, The Generals and Berry round out the region's top-5.

The Captains round out the pre-season poll at No. 35 while Bridgewater cracks the region top-10 prediction thanks to its strong returning core.

In lieu of a conference pre-season poll, the ODAC Associate Commissioner, JJ Nekoloff, spoke with three coaches from around the league to examine the conference landscape for the upcoming season.

SCHEDULE PREVIEW

The Generals open up the 2022 slate this weekend, half of the team will compete at the Shenandoah Twilight Invitational in Winchester, home of this year's ODAC Championship course and on Friday, September 2, the rest of the squad will compete at the Virginia Tech Invitational. Both meets will start after 6 p.m. and provide live stats.

The harriers will preview the Regional Championship course at Christopher Newport on September 16 followed by a second trip to Winchester on September 24.

Two consecutive trips up north, the Mike Woods Invitational and Inter-Regional Border Battle highlight the regular-season. At both meets, the Generals will go toe-to-toe against several nationally ranked teams and be able to gauge how W&L matches up for the post-season meets.

The ODAC Championship is October 29 at the Kernstown Battlefield, the South Regional in Newport News, Va. will take place on November 12 and the NCAA Championship, on November 19, will take place in Lansing, Mich.

KEY RETURNERS

Washington and Lee returns two USTFCCCA All-Region runners in junior Hayden Roberts (Lutherville, Md./Loyola Blakefield) and sophomore captains Josh Fingerhut (Havertown, Pa./Haverford Township). Classmate Jackson Jacobs (Brdigeport, W.Va./Bridgeport) rounded out the scoring for Washington and Lee at the Regional Championship in Spartanburg, S.C., last fall.

Roberts was the 22nd finisher and Fingerhut was No. 29 to claim their first All-Region accolades to help the Generals finish fifth place out of 23 schools.

The runner-ups in the ODAC Championship Meet, Fingerhut and Jacobs earned All-ODAC laurels with former earned Rookie of the Meet accolades, he crossed the finish line third in a field of 90 runners on the 8k course at Bridgewater. Since switching to the current conference accolades format in 2017, Fingerhut is the first General to earn Rookie of the Meet in program history, an award given to the top-finishing runner at the conference meet in the first season of competing in cross country.

Connor Verrett (Cockeysville, Md./ Loyola Blakefield) and Kyle Clarke (Sykesville, Md./ Loyola Blakefield), 2019 All-ODAC honorees, look to return to the top of the ODAC, while Chris Ruiz (Highland Lakes, N.J./ Vernon Township), MaxThomas (Winston-Salem, N.C./ Mount Tabor), Henry Haden (Atlanta, Ga./ The Lovette School) and Jake Symonds (Emerald Hills, Calif./ Crystal Springs Uplands) are expected to make a run at the top-7 for W&L and provide a lot of tight depth to bump the competition further down the finishers list.

Newcomers Charles Scharf (Elizabethtown, Pa./ Elizabethtown Area) and Colin Verrett (Cockeysville, Md./ Loyola Blakefield) will make an immediate impact. Scharf, a L1 law student, competed at Dickinson College during his undergraduate studies, he was named all-region and a national qualifier for the Red Devils. Verrett, Connor's younger brother, is no stranger to the Washington and Lee cross country program and the Generals' expectations.

The 2021 ODAC Rookie of the Meet enters into his sophomore campaign with a more formal leadership role, serving as a team captain.

After being named All-ODAC and All-Region in his first campaign, Fingerhut will look to build off his success on the course.

Off the course, Fingerhut is an Economics and Environmental Studies double major who is serving as the Financial Controller for Mock Convention and was elected as the Incoming Executive Director for the Williams Investment Society beginning in winter term.

A member of Washington and Lee Hillel, Josh spent his summer working as an equity research analyst.

We have a very complete team heading into the fall. I expect us to have a strong presence up front and we will rely heavily on our depth as we progress through the season.

Feds settle with Jackson, New Jersey, over Jewish boarding schools

The federal government agreed to settle a lawsuit with a New Jersey town accused of passing laws to ban Orthodox Jewish religious boarding schools.The US Department of Justice had sued Jackson Township for passing two laws in 2017 that banned dormitories and limited where religious schools could be built in what the feds say was an effort to discourage Orthodox Jews from “living or moving” into the town.Jackson agreed to rescind the “discriminatory” ordinance and pay a $45,000 fine, the DOJ announced Wed...

The federal government agreed to settle a lawsuit with a New Jersey town accused of passing laws to ban Orthodox Jewish religious boarding schools.

The US Department of Justice had sued Jackson Township for passing two laws in 2017 that banned dormitories and limited where religious schools could be built in what the feds say was an effort to discourage Orthodox Jews from “living or moving” into the town.

Jackson agreed to rescind the “discriminatory” ordinance and pay a $45,000 fine, the DOJ announced Wednesday. The town will also pay $150,000 into a fund for anyone who may have suffered from the alleged discrimination, according to a news release.

“Zoning restrictions that intentionally target religious communities have no place in our society,” Assistant Attorney General Kristen Clarke said in a statement.

“Federal civil rights laws provide strong protections to ensure that religious communities are treated equally and not subjected to discrimination because of their beliefs. This resolution reaffirms that members of the Orthodox Jewish community — as with people of all faiths — are welcome in our communities and have the right to practice their religion free of discrimination.”

Jackson, in Ocean County, had passed the two zoning ordinances as the Orthodox Jewish population in the region was experiencing a boom, the DOJ said.

Its government boards approved the changes to make it “impossible or nearly impossible” to operate a religious school in Jackson, the DOJ claimed. One ordinance banned dormitories, which are a fixture of Orthodox religious schools, and another removed schools as an acceptable building use in many parts of Jackson, the DOJ said.

The federal government sued in May 2020, saying Jackson violated the federal Religious Land Use and Institutionalized Persons Act and the Fair Housing Act.

About 1,000 Orthodox families among the town’s 59,000 residents are Orthodox Jewish, the federal government said in its proposed consent decree.

As part of the three-year settlement, which still needs to be approved by a judge, officials agreed to pass a new ordinance that will allow religious schools of all types, including residential schools. They’ll also have to train employees on federal anti-discrimination laws.

Mayor Michael Reina said in a statement that Jackson “welcomes and embraces people of all faiths, races and ethnic backgrounds.”

“It’s time for Jackson Township to move forward,” Reina said. “This governing body is committed to ensuring that we will do just that in order to foster one, united community, respectful of all people who call Jackson home.”

Massive surf park coming to Jackson, NJ

If you want to surf the famous waves of Malibu or Waikiki, you may soon be able to do it right here in New Jersey.Jackson Township zoning officials have given approval to an 88-acre expansion of the Adventure Crossing USA theme park on Route 537, just up the r...

If you want to surf the famous waves of Malibu or Waikiki, you may soon be able to do it right here in New Jersey.

Jackson Township zoning officials have given approval to an 88-acre expansion of the Adventure Crossing USA theme park on Route 537, just up the road from Six Flags Great Adventure.

The developer, Cardinale Enterprises, bills the 5.5-acre man-made surfing lagoon as a "technological marvel" capable of producing more than 500 waves per hour.

Artificial waves will range from two-foot whitewater waves for beginners, to nearly 6-foot barrel waves. Multiple wave generators can produce vertical waves over 6-feet tall.

With controlled capacity, developers are promising an uncrowded experience for surfers of all levels and without "dangerous sea life."

Surfing is a multi-billion dollar industry and has spawned its own culture and cult following. Adventure Crossing hopes to capitalize on that, as well as introduce surfing to a new generation in a safe and controlled environment.

For those who don't want to "hang ten" on an artificial wave, a 70,000-square-foot indoor water park is also planned adjacent to the wave pool.

A 134-room hotel and new retail and restaurant offers are also in the works.

Adventure Crossing will also offer outdoor multi-use sports fields, an indoor sports complex, Top Golf, and a virtual reality arcade event space.

Local officials have been supportive of the project, despite significant opposition from local residents.

At the April 20 meeting of the Jackson Township Zoning Board, residents expressed concerns about the environmental impact and quality of life issues.

One resident said Jackson would be "a dump in five years." Another resident said board members "have not cared a lick about what the people have said (about the project) for three years."

Ultimately, the board approved the project 6-1.

The company is hoping to have a grand opening on Sept. 1.

EDITOR'S NOTE: An earlier version of this story should have said that the facilities are not yet open.

Eric Scott is the senior political director and anchor for New Jersey 101.5. You can reach him at [email protected]

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