BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Howell Township

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Howell Township, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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Basement Waterproofing in Howell Township

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Howell Township:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Howell Township

NJ heat wave day 3 of 5: Thursday, the steamiest day of the week

Heat warnings and advisories continue for almost all of New Jersey Thursday. We face three more days with high temperatures of 90+ degrees. The next two days are going to be especially tropical, as the heat index potentially pushes past 105. We're talking about thunderstorms too. More importantly, the big cooldown arrives this weekend.Same story, different day. It will be hazy, hot, and humid - one of the hottest days of 2021. Morning temperatures are in the lower to mid 70s. Afternoon highs will push into the mid 90s. Add in the humi...

Heat warnings and advisories continue for almost all of New Jersey Thursday. We face three more days with high temperatures of 90+ degrees. The next two days are going to be especially tropical, as the heat index potentially pushes past 105. We're talking about thunderstorms too. More importantly, the big cooldown arrives this weekend.

Same story, different day. It will be hazy, hot, and humid - one of the hottest days of 2021. Morning temperatures are in the lower to mid 70s. Afternoon highs will push into the mid 90s. Add in the humidity, and you get a heat index above 105 for most of the state. Firmly in the danger zone.

My forecast high for Newark Thursday is 98 degrees. That would tie the previous record high temperature of 98 set in 1944. The records for Trenton and Atlantic City are both 96 - it will be close.

An Excessive Heat Warning continues for most of New Jersey Thursday. (And for most of the warning area, it has been extended through 8 p.m. Friday, as expected.) A less-severe Heat Advisory continues for far northern, far southern, and coastal New Jersey.

Barrier islands will be the only spot in the state with a chance of not hitting 90+. It's still going to be uncomfortably hot and humid, of course.

Weatherwise, we are starting the day with an isolated batch of rain over northeastern New Jersey (as of 5:30 a.m.) Skies should be mostly sunny throughout Thursday, with some clouds building late-day.

And then, just like Wednesday evening, we'll have to watch the western sky Thursday evening for thunderstorms. Just like Wednesday, the best chance for storms will be to the north and west. Those storms will be capable of producing some gusty wind, frequent lightning, and very heavy rain. Models once again show thunderstorms will probably fizzle out before reaching the coast.

The rest of the overnight looks really steamy. Areas that don't see rain will struggle to fall below 75 degrees. It could be one of the warmest nights of the summer.

One more ferociously, dangerously hot day. It still looks like dew points slip downward ever so slightly. So I'll put the heat index at 100+, instead of 105+. (Woohoo.) High temperatures will once again hit the lower to mid 90s.

In case you're keeping score, Friday will be NJ's 14th 95+ degree day of 2021. That is a lot, but nowhere near a record. 1993 had 25 such hot days.

The day looks to feature hazy sunshine. And, with a later arrival time of our inevitable cold front, I've opted for a dry, storm-free forecast for Friday for now.

The big transition day. A slow-moving cold front will eventually drive in the cooler, drier air that will put an end to our latest wave of extreme heat.

But that will not be an immediate change. Saturday will be a humid and very warm day. I fully expect parts of NJ to still hit 90 degrees. Not everywhere. And the heat index will only reach the 90s - that's why the heat warnings and advisories will not last through the weekend.

The timing of that front will dictate our rain chances for Saturday. I think if the frontal boundary pushes into NJ in the early morning hours (per the GFS model), it will be a mainly dry event. However, if it passes later, say midday into the afternoon, we will likely face a round of scattered showers and thunderstorms during the day Saturday (as the Euro model suggests).

Sorry I can't be any more definitive about the critical weekend forecast just yet. It's not going to be a washout. And before and after the rain chance, it will be a reasonably pleasant (albeit hot) day.

Saturday night will be the big turning point in our air mass. It's going to feel way more comfortable, as dew points drop from the 70s to the 40s. That's dry air!

Thermometers could dip into the 50s in the coolest parts of the state by Sunday morning. Otherwise, 60s.

A nice summer day. Sun and clouds. Highs in the lower 80s. Low humidity. I'm keeping the forecast dry for now.

I can't look too far into the future at this time. Because of Fred.

Tropical Depression Fred was centered between Haiti and Cuba as of 5 a.m. Thursday. That's about 1,300 miles south of New Jersey. The mountains of Hispanola did a number on the storm, now showing a disorganized structure and maximum sustained winds of 35 mph. (Tropical storm strength starts at 39 mph.)

Fred's forecast track still travels along the Gulf coast of Florida this weekend, with a potential landfall near the Florida panhandle Monday morning.

Which direction the storm takes thereafter will dictate New Jersey's weather next week. If it hangs a right turn and ejects into the Atlantic Ocean from the Carolinas, we'll enjoy dry weather and dry air for almost a week straight. However, if it charges farther north and west into the Ohio Valley, our weather would be considerably wetter and more unsettled through the middle to late part of next week.

Plenty of time to figure it all out. In the meantime, stay cool (in more ways than one), stay hydrated, stay safe, and make it a great day!

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

Henri fly-by for NJ: Inclement weather, angry ocean this weekend

As of Friday morning, Tropical Storm Henri is centered approximately 600 miles south of Cape May, New Jersey. From late Saturday night into early Sunday morning, it is expected to pass about 100-200 east of the Jersey Shore, as a category one hurricane.So we face inclement, but not particularly dangerous, weather at times through the weekend. Rain, wind, and clouds are in the forecast, no matter where in the state you are. Having said that, we will salvage some breaks of dry weather, especially early Saturday and late Sunday.Th...

As of Friday morning, Tropical Storm Henri is centered approximately 600 miles south of Cape May, New Jersey. From late Saturday night into early Sunday morning, it is expected to pass about 100-200 east of the Jersey Shore, as a category one hurricane.

So we face inclement, but not particularly dangerous, weather at times through the weekend. Rain, wind, and clouds are in the forecast, no matter where in the state you are. Having said that, we will salvage some breaks of dry weather, especially early Saturday and late Sunday.

The coast is more concerning, due to the threat of rip currents, rough surf, and coastal flooding.

As Henri departs, the heat is on again next week.

We have some rain in the neighborhood this Friday morning, that is not directly related to Tropical Storm Henri. (You could make the case that Henri is enriching our atmosphere with tropical moisture and enhancing the rain, but it's not the primary driver here.)

The most substantial batches of rain and the wettest weather will be found in southern and central New Jersey through the first half of the day. By mid afternoon, we should be in a solid drying trend - although a few isolated shower or thunderstorms may popup later on.

Rainfall totals will range from a trace (if that) in North Jersey to a spotty inch in South Jersey.

Meanwhile, where it's not raining, it does feel a bit more comfortable than Thursday. Although AM temps are in the 70s, we've stepped down from "truly tropical" humidity levels.

Skies throughout Friday will be pretty overcast, keeping temperatures down. Highs will only reach about 80 degrees in the afternoon. If you catch a pop of sun at some point, a more seasonable 85 is a possibility.

Friday night looks quiet. Mostly cloudy, near 70.

As Henri makes its closest pass to New Jersey this weekend, our weather will be pretty blah overall. Not a great beach weekend, unfortunately. (And you have no idea how much I hate saying that in the summertime.)

There are no hurricane or tropical storm watches or warnings issued for New Jersey. That alone should be very telling in how severe the storm is expected to be.

Henri's track has been precarious, wiggling back and forth between "no big deal" and "uh oh". There is still a "worst case scenario" in play, which would result in more substantial rain and possibly tropical storm force winds. But the "most likely" consensus forecast is about the same as it has been, pushing Henri's center more toward eastern Long Island, Rhode Island, and Cape Cod than New Jersey.

Bottom line: Henri will absolutely come close enough to spit some rain, wind, and clouds our way. And the ocean will be angry, my friends.

Over the course of Saturday and Sunday, we'll probably see about two or three bands of rain approach the Shore. However, we will be on the western edge of Henri - that is the dry side of the storm.

More than likely, I suspect the first such band Saturday afternoon will be nothing more than an unimpressive round of splotchy, spotty showers.

The second potential round of rain could be more impactful, as the center of Henri comes closer Saturday night through Sunday morning. I could see some embedded downpours, especially along the coast.

And then the third rain chance during the day on Sunday could be about the same - scattered heavy stuff is possible, but not guaranteed.

How much rain you see by the end of the weekend is dependent on when and where the heaviest rain bands set up. I've seen guidance show rainfall estimates as low as a quarter-inch (inland). And perhaps as high as 3 inches (coast), if and only if a tropical downpour appears at some point.

At the very least, it's going to become "breezy" from Saturday night into Sunday, especially along the eastern edge of New Jersey. Depending on how close the stronger center of Henri's circulation gets, those gusts may approach tropical storm strength (39+ mph). That is enough to blow down some weaker trees and cause sporadic power outages.

Peak winds will blow out of the north-northwest around daybreak Sunday morning.

As we saw from Fay and Isaias in 2020 and Elsa last month, hurricanes can generate tornadoes. Especially when you're close to the storm's center.

But we won't be near the storm's center - it will stay 100 to 200 miles east. Therefore, the risk of tornadoes in New Jersey will be very low.

Most likely, New Jersey's most significant impact from Hurricane Henri will be along the coast.

A high risk of dangerous rip currents is already posted for Cape May and Atlantic counties on Friday. While the official risk level is only moderate for Ocean and Monmouth, that will absolutely bump to high by Saturday. The ocean will remain very rough through Sunday too, before calming significantly on Monday.

I'm seeing the potential for 5 to 8 foot ocean waves, which could cause moderate beach erosion. Not a good development at the tail-end of the summer beach season.

And finally, we have to talk about storm surge and coastal flooding. The latest tidal guidance suggests about a foot of surge (or a little more) will spawn minor coastal flooding for 3 or 4 consecutive high tide cycles. Saturday morning, Saturday afternoon, Sunday morning, and possibly Sunday afternoon.

Minor category flooding equates to "the usual spots," that tend to flood during every major storm. Barrier islands, low-lying areas along routes 35 and 36, etc.

Because NJ's strongest winds will be on the backside of Henri, blowing from the north-northwest (not east-southeast), we will be spared even more serious tidal impacts.

.As Henri exits, we could see drier weather and brighter skies by Sunday late afternoon and evening. High temperatures should reach the lower 80s on Saturday and the seasonable mid 80s on Sunday.

Monday will continue the streak of consecutive "chance of rain" days, with some thunderstorms possibly in the middle of the day. Regardless, our warming trend will continue, with high temps in the upper 80s to around 90 degrees.

While Tuesday and Wednesday look dry, they will also be hot. Thermometers will return to widespread 90s away from the coast. Humidity will be "there" - not too high, but not quite low either. Some model temperatures go as high as 95-96 degrees in urban areas, which could be enough to push the heat index into the "danger zone".

Thursday and Friday look hot and increasingly unsettled. Long-range models have been remarkably stable in showing a strong cold front arriving late Friday. That would introduce thunderstorms, then open the door to some welcome cooler and drier air for next weekend.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

Jack Ciattarelli meets with Ocean County seniors to hear affordability concerns

Affordability and lower taxes are pipe dreams for many New Jerseyans from residents to business owners, although they hope for better days and greener pastures ahead.The economic impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic have dealt a dagger to many businesses and left many residents in situations where they had to already contemplate living and working in the Garden State prior to 2020.As the iconic and legendary Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra, ...

Affordability and lower taxes are pipe dreams for many New Jerseyans from residents to business owners, although they hope for better days and greener pastures ahead.

The economic impacts of the Covid-19 pandemic have dealt a dagger to many businesses and left many residents in situations where they had to already contemplate living and working in the Garden State prior to 2020.

As the iconic and legendary Lawrence Peter "Yogi" Berra, who moved to New Jersey, said, "it gets late early out there."

New Jerseyans are hoping the light comes out of the darkness of the night sooner rather than later in terms of affordability and taxes.

Republican Gubernatorial candidate for New Jersey Governor, Jack Ciattarelli, was at a home in Tuckerton on Thursday morning for a roundtable discussion hearing the concerns of Southern Ocean County residents with regard to property taxes, affordability and how small business owners are being impacted economically.

One of the main talking points and focuses for Ciattarelli Thursday and throughout his campaign is his vision to address New Jersey's financial woes which do include property taxes and the concerns of homeowners.

"What we're hearing from homeowners is what we've always heard from homeowners, property taxes are too high in New Jersey," Ciattarelli told Townsquare Media News on Thursday. "It's sad when you hear stories of people telling you that the monthly bill for property taxes is more than their mortgage ever was -- welcome to New Jersey -- but I'm here to say it doesn't have to be that way, we've got changes in mind for when I'm Governor that are going to allow people to live out their lives in their homes."

Two of the solutions Ciattarelli has in mind, he would enact as Governor, is freezing property taxes at age 65 and making all retirement income tax free.

"Those are two things that would go a long way to making New Jersey more affordable for our senior citizens," Ciattareill said.

He has a mission of being "very clear" with his plans and how they would affect New Jerseyans and then trying to get the Legislature on board with this ideas.

"When I'm elected by the people of New Jersey, that says that they've endorsed my proposals so it's (would be) time for the Legislature to work in partnership with me to enact those proposals," Ciatarelli said. "If the Legislature doesn't, we'll put it on the ballot, let the people decide, let's have a constitutional amendment."

Residents from across Ocean County, Monmouth County and the entire state have similar needs in some cases and different ones in other areas.

"When you're talking to senior citizens, they want to be able to continue to afford their home, so we've got to lower property taxes. When you talk to couples with small children, they want to know they're going to be able to get ahead and save for college. When you talk to young people, they want to know that they can get started here," Ciattarelli said. "I've got proposals all throughout my platform that speak to each one of those constituencies."

NJ weather: Fred remnants exit, now watching Tropical Storm Henri

What a dramatic, tropical night. For part of New Jersey, at least. According to radar, over 3 inches of rain fell over Warren County, New Jersey overnight. Just west of Philadelphia, over 6 inches! Multiple tornado warnings, flash flood warnings, and blinding rain.On the flip side, from Monmouth County to the bottom of the state? Hardly anything at all, spared the drama and thorough soaking.The unsettled weather continues for the next few days, as we end up sandwiched between two storm systems. A trough to the southwest will ke...

What a dramatic, tropical night. For part of New Jersey, at least. According to radar, over 3 inches of rain fell over Warren County, New Jersey overnight. Just west of Philadelphia, over 6 inches! Multiple tornado warnings, flash flood warnings, and blinding rain.

On the flip side, from Monmouth County to the bottom of the state? Hardly anything at all, spared the drama and thorough soaking.

The unsettled weather continues for the next few days, as we end up sandwiched between two storm systems. A trough to the southwest will keep rain chances in the forecast. And Tropical Storm Henri (on-REE') out in the Atlantic will cause rough surf and rip current concerns, in addition to enhancing those rain chances through the weekend.

As of this writing (5:30 a.m.), NJ's rain is almost completely done, as Fred's remnant low heads into New England. The rest of Thursday looks mainly dry, although a few spot showers and thunderstorms may pop up later on.

Otherwise, the day begins with clouds and downright tropical humidity. Where it didn't rain, temperatures are hovering very close to 80 degrees - yuck! We will see substantial breaks of sun and blue sky by Thursday afternoon. It will be a very warm and humid summer day, with high temperatures between about 85 and 90 degrees.

Headed to the beach? A moderate risk of rip currents is already posted as Henri churns up the Atlantic. (More on that later.)

Thursday night looks partly cloudy, warm, and muggy. Low temperatures will only drop into the lower 70s. Both highs and lows here are hovering about 5 degrees above seasonal normals.

Still unsettled. There is a relatively wide spread of model solutions for Friday, but most of them include scattered showers and thunderstorms. The best chance for periods of rain seems to be in the southern half of the state, during the daytime hours.

Our severe weather risk should remain low, with abundant cloud cover and limited heating of the atmosphere. There could be some splashes of heavy rain - if that happens on an already-soaked ground, ponding and flooding issues could occur quickly.

Where it rains Friday, high temperatures will only reach about 80 degrees. Where it doesn't, the thermometer should climb closer to 85.

Here's where the impacts of Henri kick in. There was one recent model run that made my heart stop, wiggling the storm significantly closer to New Jersey. (Even putting NE NJ in the National Hurricane Center's forecast cone of uncertainty - yikes!)

But the consensus track remains consistent, keeping the center of Henri about 200 to 300 miles east of New Jersey. It will likely be a category one hurricane at that point. The worst wind and rain will be limited to the inner 50 to 100 miles of the storm. (And we're on the weaker, drier side anyway.)

So as long as Henri doesn't significantly wiggle again, the Jersey Shore will be safe from a "direct" hit.

However, dangerous rip currents and rough surf will absolutely be a concern - likely a "high risk" posted for Friday, Saturday, and Sunday. And we could see some enhanced rain chances through the weekend too.

Confidence is low as to the exact timing and position of rain bands this weekend. It looks like we could see a few showers on Saturday, but there will be completely dry periods too. With mostly cloudy to overcast skies, high temperatures will be limited to the lower 80s or so.

From Saturday night into early Sunday, Henri itself could spit some showers toward NJ. Then the sky will probably brighten. It will probably stay breezy for the first half of the day too. Model guidance puts highs in the above-normal upper 80s to close out the weekend.

The long-range forecast shows our next heat wave is on the way for next week. Widespread 90s are expected (away from the coast) for at least Monday, Tuesday, and Wednesday. Minimal rain and thunderstorm chances each day (although not zero). Under partly sunny skies.

The GFS model favors a cold front late next week, around Thursday or Friday. That will hopefully knock down temperatures and also provide welcome relief from these weeks of high humidity.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

What new COVID restrictions are likely for NJ?

With COVID now surging across the U.S. and in New Jersey, will new restrictions be coming?Gov. Phil Murphy has been vacationing at his posh Italian Villa and is not due back in New Jersey until Thursday. It is increasingly expected when he returns he will implement new restrictions designed to curb transmissions of the dangerous Delta variant.The most likely first step is to impose a new mask mandate an...

With COVID now surging across the U.S. and in New Jersey, will new restrictions be coming?

Gov. Phil Murphy has been vacationing at his posh Italian Villa and is not due back in New Jersey until Thursday. It is increasingly expected when he returns he will implement new restrictions designed to curb transmissions of the dangerous Delta variant.

The most likely first step is to impose a new mask mandate and encourage social distancing. That would be in line with what the CDC is currently recommending. Murphy has already ordered all students and staff to mask up when school resumes on a few weeks.

When Murphy allowed the public health emergency to expire, he demanded the Legislature extend many of his sweeping pandemic powers. They did. If the rate of transmission rises above 1.0 and/or hospitalizations spike, Murphy's powers to restrict what New Jersey residents can and cannot do go back in effect. The rate is 1.26 and hospitalizations have been steadily increasing, to 760.

While a new mask mandate and social distancing rules are likely, it is less likely Murphy will impose new gathering limits and highly unlikely he will take the extreme steps we are seeing in New York City.

City officials have announced the Key to NYC program. It will require anyone wanting access to indoor spaces and venues like restaurants, gyms and theaters to provide proof of vaccination status.

Contrast those rules with what we saw at the Phish concert this weekend in Atlantic City. The three day music fest drew nearly 40,000 people to the seaside resort town. No proof of vaccination status was required for entry. Social distancing was encouraged, but photos from the event show little space between most attendees.

Phish has announced all future concerts will require proof of vaccination or a negative test.

New Jersey has a relatively high vaccination rate compared to the rest of the nation. More than 5.4 million are considered fully vaccinated. Murphy has said that is one of the reasons he has not imposed sweeping new mandates even as the number of COVID cases have spiked more than 340% month to month.

While he may impose a mask mandate, Murphy appears content to let local towns and private businesses set their own rules as he runs for reelection.

Hoboken may encourage bars to deny entry to the unvaccinated. A Bergen County Greek restaurant announced a vaccine mandate for indoor dining. More private companies are considering vaccine requirements as a condition of employment.

Murphy, and his family, will have to show proof of a negative COVID test before being allowed to fly back to the U.S. on Thursday. Presuming that happens, he is likely to hold a briefing on Friday. We should get a pretty good idea of what's next at that time.

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