BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Englishtown

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Englishtown, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Englishtown, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Englishtown, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Englishtown, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Englishtown, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Englishtown, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Englishtown

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Englishtown:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Englishtown, NJ

Latest News in Englishtown, NJ

Things to do Labor Day weekend at the Jersey Shore: Grateful Dead tribute, new brewery

The Grateful Dead made history in New Jersey 45 years ago, and that Englishtown history comes to life this weekend in Asbury Park.The iconic jam band's Sept. 3, 1977, appearance at Old Bridge Township Raceway Park drew a reported 107,000 to the site, making it the biggest concert in New Jersey and one of the highest-attended non-fes...

The Grateful Dead made history in New Jersey 45 years ago, and that Englishtown history comes to life this weekend in Asbury Park.

The iconic jam band's Sept. 3, 1977, appearance at Old Bridge Township Raceway Park drew a reported 107,000 to the site, making it the biggest concert in New Jersey and one of the highest-attended non-festival shows ever.

The show, which also featured New Riders of the Purple Sage and the Marshall Tucker Band, cast such a long shadow that for his 15 years in the New Riders guitarist Michael Falzarano couldn't escape it.

"Everywhere I went it seemed like somebody would come up to me and say, 'I saw you guys in Englishtown' or 'I was in Englishtown, it was my first show,'" Falzarano, who also played in Hot Tuna, told the Asbury Park Press in 2019.

Falzarano is the guitarist behind the Englishtown Project, a tribute act celebrating all of the music played on that storied day. The band plays the Wonder Bar 8 p.m. Friday.

“Asbury Park has always been this sort of mythological place to go play music," Falzarano, who lives in Millstone, said. "And throughout the '70s, '80s and '90s, until now, I've toured there many times with Hot Tuna, with Jorma (Kaukonen) and the New Riders, and I love the audience in Asbury Park. It's always probably one of the most enthusiastic audiences in the country. They're always down for a good time. They appreciate good music."

Go: The Englishtown Project, 8 p.m. Friday at the Wonder Bar, Fifth and Ocean Avenues, Asbury Park, $20 in advance and $25 at the door; wonderbarasburypark.com.

Pancake breakfast to benefit local firemen

Before you hit the beach this Labor Day weekend, grab some grub at the Ocean Beach Volunteer Fire Company's pancake breakfast.

All-you-can-eat pancakes will be served from 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday at the firehouse, 40 Kittiwake Ave. in Lavallette. The menu also includes sausage, eggs, potatoes and watermelon, plus coffee, tea, milk and juice.

The cost is $12 for adults and children 10 and older, $6 for children younger than 10, and there is no charge for children younger than 3. Cash only.

The morning also will feature giveaways, a raffle and T-shirt sales.

Go: Ocean Beach Volunteer Fire Company pancake breakfast, 8 to 11 a.m. Sunday, 40 Kittiwake Ave., Lavallette, $12 for adults and children 10 and older, $6 for children 3 to 9, cash only.

Wild Air Beerworks opens for business

There’s something in the air in Asbury Park.

Wild Air Beerworks joins the Jersey Shore craft brewing scene as it hosts its grand opening noon to 10 pm. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday at its tasting room, 1001 Main Street.

The new venture is from the owners of Last Wave Brewing Co. in Point Pleasant Beach: Nick Jiorle, Bert Roling and his wife, Dani Roling. It’s located at the former site of Dark City Brewing Co., which closed in 2020.

Jiorle told the Asbury Park Press this spring that beyond a house India Pale Ale and kettle sour, the brewery will focus on classic lager styles, wild ales and spontaneous beer.

Go: Wild Air Beerworks’ grand opening, noon to 10 p.m. Saturday and noon to 8 p.m. Sunday, 1001 Main St., Asbury Park; for more information, visit wildairbeer.com.

The Foundation Room gallery opens at Asbury Ocean Club

A new space is joining the Asbury Park fine arts world this weekend as the Foundation Room opens on the ground floor of the Asbury Ocean Club in partnership with Michael and Susan Hort of the Rema Hort Mann Foundation.

The gallery opens with an exhibition of the works of Joe “Doodle Boy” Whale, with the public invited to an opening reception 6 to 8 p.m. Friday. In the spirit of Whale’s art, attendees are encouraged to wear black or white.

Go: The Foundation Room hosts the work of Joe “Doodle Boy” Whale, opening reception 6 to 8 p.m. Friday at the Asbury Ocean Club, 1101 Ocean Ave., Asbury Park; https://hotel.asburyoceanclub.com/hotel.

‘Holiday Encores’ in Ocean Grove

Turn back the clock this Labor Day with “Holiday Encores: Radio Wave, Echoes of Yesteryear,” presented by the Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association 7 p.m. Monday at the Great Auditorium, Pilgrim and Ocean Pathways in the Ocean Grove section of Neptune.

Bringing listeners back to the “Firestone Radio Hour,” which was broadcast from 1928 to 1957 on NBC, the show will feature organist Gordan Turk and singer Kevin Short, with Ocean Grove Camp Meeting Association Director of Music Ministries Jason Tramm serving as the emcee.

Go: “Holiday Encores: Echoes of Yesteryear,” 7 p.m. Monday at the Great Auditorium, Pilgrim and Ocean Pathways in the Ocean Grove section of Neptune, $14; oceangrove.org/encores.

$3 movies in Asbury Park for National Cinema Day

Let's all go to the movies this Saturday.

The ShowRoom Cinema, 707 Cookman Ave., is participating in National Cinema Day on Saturday. All tickets for all screenings will be just $3. Featured films that day will include "Three Thousand Years of Longing," "The Good Boss," "Funny Pages" and "Everything Everywhere All at Once."

National Cinema Day was launched by the Cinema Foundation in an effort to welcome post-lockdown audiences back to movie theaters.

In other ShowRoom news, tickets ($20) are now on sale for a comedy fundraiser to support the theater 7:30 p.m. Tuesday, Sept. 13.

Presented by Ugly Pancake Productions and hosted by Joe Borzotta and Angelo Gingerelli, the show will feature Taylor Allen, Vin Brue, Alex Delesky and Donna Lloyd.

Go: The ShowRoom Cinema, 707 Cookman Ave., Asbury Park; showroomcinemas.com.

Ben Folds in Red Bank

One of the great ironies of alt-rock music was that the Ben Folds Five only had three members.

Folds is going make the counting easier as he's a solo for his “Ben Folds: In Actual Person Live For Real Tour” show, which comes Friday, Sept. 2 to the Hackensack Meridian Health Theatre of the Count Basie Center for the Arts in Red Bank.

Folds with his group had the breakthrough single “Brick,” and he's gone on to collaborate with William Shatner, Regina Spektor, “Weird Al” Yankovic and more, and perform with orchestras, too.

Go: Ben Folds, 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2, Count Basie Center for the Arts, 99 Monmouth St., Red Bank. $25 to $79. thebasie.org.

Gotham Burger Social Club comes to The Asbury Hotel

New York City's Gotham Burger Social Club is coming to town this Saturday, hosting a pop-up from noon to 3 p.m. at The Asbury Hotel, 201 Fifth Ave.

Founder Mike Puma, who created the burger-reviewing club in 2013, will be cooking smash burgers by the pool. Tickets include a single or double Wagyu burger, all-day pool and bar access, live music, and access to special brews from Asbury Park Brewery. Additional food from the hotel will be available for purchase.

Tickets start at $20. The cost of general admission, which does not include a burger, is $10. Purchase tickets at eventbrite.com; search "Smash N' Splash."

Sarah Griesemer and Chris Jordan contributed to this story.

Labor Day Weekend at the Jersey Shore: Frank, Sylvester Stallone, Southside Johnny, more

This Labor Day Weekend at the Jersey Shore is going to be a knockout.That's because Sylvester Stallone, star of the Rocky movies, will host a performance by his brother, Frank Stallone, 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2 on the Sound Waves stage at the Hard Rock Atlantic City.John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band are also on the and it'll be “a night of music, movies and stories,” according to the venue.Frank has been a regular in his older brother's movies, appearing in “Rocky,” “Rocky...

This Labor Day Weekend at the Jersey Shore is going to be a knockout.

That's because Sylvester Stallone, star of the Rocky movies, will host a performance by his brother, Frank Stallone, 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2 on the Sound Waves stage at the Hard Rock Atlantic City.

John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band are also on the and it'll be “a night of music, movies and stories,” according to the venue.

Frank has been a regular in his older brother's movies, appearing in “Rocky,” “Rocky II,” “Rocky III,” “Rocky Balboa,” “Paradise Alley,” “Staying Alive,” “Get Carter,” “The Good Life,” and “Reach Me.” He also had a Top 10 hit, “Far From Over,” from “Staying Alive.”

The Stallones grew up in New York City, Washington, D.C. and Philadelphia, and Frank has Jersey music roots. In the 70s, he lived in Trenton, where his former band Valentine was based.

Syl, 76, has been in the news lately as he and his wife of 25 years, Jennifer Flavin, 54, are getting divorced.

Go: Frank Stallone with Sylvester Stallone and John Cafferty and the Beaver Brown Band, 9 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2, Hard Rock Atlantic City, 1000 Boardwalk, Atlantic City. $39 and up. www.hardrockhotelatlanticcity.com.

Temptations party at Headliner

Alas, Temptations in Seaside Heights is no longer with us, but the spirit lives on in Neptune.

The Jersey Shore Classics Reunion party will take place 1 p.m. to sundown Saturday, Sept. 3 with Jersey deejay legend Denny Tsettos spinning the dance hits in a tribute to the former Temptations, aka Tempts. It goes down at the Oasis Pool and Day Club at the Headliner, and swimwear is suggested but not required.

Valentino Khan spins in the Headliner main room Saturday night, and Oscar G is behind the decks at the pool on Sunday, Sept. 4.

Go: DJ Denny Tsettos Temptations Pool Party, 1 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, Headliner Oasis Pool, Route 35, Neptune. $12. www.headlineroasis.com.

An Englishtown party in Asbury Park

On Labor Day Weekend in 1977, more than 100,000 music fans converged on Raceway Park in Old Bridge for see the Grateful Dead, the Marshall Tucker Band and the New Riders of the Purple Sage.

Chances are if you're reading this in Jersey, you or someone you know were there.

The Englishtown Project, headed by Michael Falzarano, longtime member of Hot Tuna and the New Riders of the Purple Sage, seeks to recreate the vibe of that momentous show.

“There were over 60 songs played at that show, all of which are instantly recognizable,” says the band, who play Friday, Sept. 2 at the Wonder Bar.

Oh, it's “Englishtown” because for decades Raceway Park was identified as being in the Englishtown section of Manalapan.

Go: The Englishtown Project, 8 p.m. Friday, Sept. 2, Wonder Bar, Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park. $20. wonderbarasburypark.com.

Southside returns to the Stone Pony

Here's a show with a bang.

The Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes with the Jake Clemons Band show Sunday, Sept. 4 at the Stone Pony Summer Stage was originally scheduled to take place July 2 but was postponed due to the weather. It's on now with Jarod Clemons and the Late Nights and the Promised Land playing inside before the show, and the Gary Frost Band playing the after-show, also inside.

Tickets from July 2 will be honored.

Go: Southside Johnny and the Asbury Jukes with the Jake Clemons Band, 5:30 p.m. Sunday, Sept. 4, Stone Pony Summer Stage, Ocean Avenue, Asbury Park. $45. stoneponyonline.com.

Bar A bash in Lake Como

DJ Vito G, who made a name for himself at the Pool After Dark in Harrah's Atlantic City, is making a splash in the deejay world. He spins 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3 at the Bar Anticipation Summer Stage in Lake Como.

DJ Proud is on the decks before him and DJ Mike Nice spins inside on Saturday.

On Sunday, Sept. 4, the Annual Bud Bash with Big Bang Baby and more takes place at Bar A starting at 4 p.m.

Go: DJ Vito G, 11 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, Bar Anticipation, 703 16th Ave., Lake Como. $10 to $20. bar-a.com.

Jazz on the boardwalk

And now for something different….

Captain Cream and the Forest Fires have been burning up the stages of the Asbury Park Yacht Club and adjacent of the Langosta Lounge on the boardwalk in Asbury Park this summer with a deep stock of improvisational jams on jazz and pop hits of yesterday and today. It's something that, if you're a music fan, you won't want to miss.

The next show is 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1 at the APYC. Jazzbury Park with Red 1-2-3 is on the Langosta stage on Thursday, so we might be witnessing a jazz revival in the city as it happens.

Go: Captain Cream and the Forest Fires, 8 p.m. Thursday, Sept. 1, Asbury Park Yacht Club, Boardwalk, Asbury Park. Free. www.langostalounge.com.

Phish livestream at the Saint

If you didn't get to see the three-night stand of Phish on the beach in Atlantic City earlier this month, now you can get the next best thing.

A livestream of their show of their Thursday, Sept. 1 show at the Dick’s Sporting Goods Park, in Commerce City, Colorado will be presented by the Saint in Asbury Park.

“Set the gearshift for the high gear of your soul. Run, run, run,” they say. The night is free and the music starts at 9:30 p.m.

Go: Phish Livestream, 9:30 p.m. (doors 7 p.m.), The Saint, 601 Main St, Asbury Park. Free. www.thesaintnj.com.

Steve Wynn in the Man Cave

Steve Wynn living room tour is making a stop at Randy Now's Man Cave, the groovy record store that's now in Hightstown.

Wynn, from the Dream Syndicate and the Baseball Project, will be in his zone.

“When I am on tour and going around the county, I like to go to record stores because it’s like a second home for me partially because you see friends at the stores,” said Wynn to Goldminemag.com. “Working at a record store was my main job before the Dream Syndicate back in 1982.”

He'll feel right at home in the new, expanded Man Cave.

Go: Steve Wynn, 7 p.m. Saturday, Sept. 3, Randy Now's Man Cave, 119 W. Ward St., Hightstown. $25. www.mancavenj.com.

Subscribe to app.com for the latest on the New Jersey music scene.

Chris Jordan, a Jersey Shore native, covers music and entertainment for the USA Today Network New Jersey. Contact him at @chrisfhjordan; [email protected]

Inside N.J.’s Himalayan salt cave, where healing draws huge crowds

I walked into the odd cave saddled with anxiety and congestion from severe allergies. Less than an hour later, I emerged feeling relaxed and much clearer.The secret? Salt. Nearly 13 tons of the stuff, all of it imported from Pakistan. Since at least the 19th Century, people have used salt — more commonly saltwater immersion — to cure or manage symptoms of migraines, arthritis, and much more. But salt caves are designed to concentrate the healing effects; 45 minutes spent in a Himalayan salt cave (even one built in Central ...

I walked into the odd cave saddled with anxiety and congestion from severe allergies. Less than an hour later, I emerged feeling relaxed and much clearer.

The secret? Salt. Nearly 13 tons of the stuff, all of it imported from Pakistan. Since at least the 19th Century, people have used salt — more commonly saltwater immersion — to cure or manage symptoms of migraines, arthritis, and much more. But salt caves are designed to concentrate the healing effects; 45 minutes spent in a Himalayan salt cave (even one built in Central Jersey) can be as effective as 20 hours floating in saltwater.

So in I ventured last week, journeying to the center of the popular man-made chamber inside the Himalayan Salt Cave Spa and Float in Manalapan, where lines snake out the door on weekends as customers hope for some salty special healing. The 45-minute session costs $49.

Once you enter the low-lit cave, there is — you guessed it — salt everywhere. Blocks of salt are stacked on the walls like bricks. From the door, there’s a salt tile pathway leading to a chimney-like structure also made of salt. On the floor, there are large granules of the Himalayan salt into which you may submerge your feet, similar to sand on the beach.

On the ceiling, a large projector features subtle starlights as calm music plays in the background to set the mood.

About a dozen comfy La-Z-Boy-adjacent chairs await customers with spa blankets for cover. I settled in and waited for the magic to happen.

With my feet in the salt, the soothing music and the dim lights, I couldn’t help but feel calm and snuggled in. Within five minutes of sitting down, I relaxed significantly and began to fall asleep. I set a timer for 20 minutes and took a lovely snooze. When I awoke, I was surprised how much my stuffy nose had actually subsided. Okay, salt cave, I’m a believer!

Besides the cave (one for adults and one for kids) this spa offers services such as massages, facials, hand and foot treatments, sauna sessions, hair removal, and flotation therapy. Construction for the spa, one of only a handful in New Jersey — others include Nature’s Salt Cave and Spa Float in Cranford and The Salt Cavern in Clifton — took about two years and they opened three days before the pandemic shut everything down, owner Rachel Ozana said. After reopening in June 2020, their clientele grew quickly — they now serve about 8,000 customers, Ozana said.

Ozana said the cave assists in easing a long list of ailments: Stress, anxiety, sleep apnea, cold, viruses, flu, ear and sinus infection, allergies, asthma, COPD, cystic fibrosis, psoriasis, chronic headache, and high blood pressure.

“Those are just some of the beneficial effects of the salt cave,” said Ozana. “But every person that goes in will tell you different things.”

Ozana decided to open the spa after she was diagnosed with COPD (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) about eight years ago. The disease, for which she took 20 daily medications, causes airflow blockage and makes it difficult to breathe.

“It took over my life and there were so many side effects,” Ozana said.

Then one day, her friend took her to a salt cave. She saw a difference in her breathing during her first session she continued to go back.

When she visited her doctor for a checkup, she was stunned by what they found.

“I went back to do three chest x-rays and they said there was no sign that I ever had COPD,” Ozana said. “It went away because of the salt cave. I gave up all my medications and never looked back.”

Of course, Ozana cannot guarantee such permanent cures for ailing salt cave visitors, nor can I confirm the cave fully eliminated my anxiety or allergies. But it certainly helped. And I’ll be returning.

Please subscribe now and support the local journalism YOU rely on and trust.

Englishtown ordinance establishes cost of garbage collection

ENGLISHTOWN – The Borough Council has adopted an ordinance that establishes a cost of about $268 for Englishtown property owners who receive solid waste collection services in 2022 through the municipality’s new solid waste utility.The ordinance was adopted by the governing body on March 23. Council President Greg Wojyn and council members Eric Mann, Dan Marter and Cecilia Robilotti voted “yes” on a motion to amend the borough’s solid waste utility ordinance. Councilmen Daniel Francisco and William Lewis ...

ENGLISHTOWN – The Borough Council has adopted an ordinance that establishes a cost of about $268 for Englishtown property owners who receive solid waste collection services in 2022 through the municipality’s new solid waste utility.

The ordinance was adopted by the governing body on March 23. Council President Greg Wojyn and council members Eric Mann, Dan Marter and Cecilia Robilotti voted “yes” on a motion to amend the borough’s solid waste utility ordinance. Councilmen Daniel Francisco and William Lewis voted “no” on the motion. The 4-2 vote carried the motion.

No members of the public spoke on the ordinance before it was adopted by the governing body.

Two weeks earlier, on March 9, council members awarded a contract to Suburban Disposal to provide garbage collection and disposal services in 2022. The projected $268 cost to a user derived from the contract with Suburban Disposal.

Wojyn, Mann, Marter and Robilotti voted “yes” to award the contract to the company. Francisco voted “no” and Lewis abstained on that item.

Under the terms of the contract, Suburban Disposal will continue to collect and dispose of garbage two days a week. Borough officials will have the option to extend the contract with the company to four years.

Officials have said Englishtown’s new solid waste utility is separate from the municipal government and will allow the borough to pay for garbage collection and disposal with revenue that is raised outside of the municipal budget (i.e., not from property taxes). The bill for the solid waste utility will be due on Oct. 15.

The issue of solid waste disposal was initially raised by Mayor Thomas Reynolds in December when he said the municipal budget would not be able to fund the borough’s contract with Suburban Disposal in 2022 due to cost increases.

The previous contract with the company was for five years and was set to expire at the end of 2021, according to borough officials. That contract allowed for solid waste to be collected and disposed of twice a week. That contract was subsequently extended until April 1.

On Feb. 23, Englishtown’s solid waste utility ordinance was adopted. Wojyn, Mann and Robilotti voted “yes” and Francisco, Lewis and Marter voted “no.” Reynolds, who can only vote to break a tie, cast the deciding vote to establish the solid waste utility.

On March 9, the night the updated ordinance was introduced, information regarding the potential cost of the solid waste utility was provided to residents.

According to borough officials, the contract proposed by Suburban Disposal would cost $268 if collection was provided twice a week; $238 if collection was provided twice a week during the summer and once a week during the winter; and $201 if collection was provided once a week all year. Collection is currently provided twice a week.

Subscription contracts were also proposed by Solterra Recycling Solutions ($310 for two collections and $234 for one collection); Sakoutis Brothers Disposal ($270 for two collections); and Republic Services ($252 for two collections).

Reynolds said none of the other contractors would provide bulk pickup, which Suburban Disposal will provide once a week. He also said because these contracts were subscriptions, the contractors could change their rates at any time.

Francisco, who supported the idea of allowing residents to hire their own contractor for garbage collection and disposal, said a private contract would offer more flexibility and control for residents.

Reynolds said allowing residents to contract for solid waste collection service individually would increase truck traffic in Englishtown and create more strain on the borough’s roads.

Some residents who spoke at the meeting agreed with the mayor that individual contracts would not be viable because of the potential impact of additional trucks.

Municipal officials also discussed whether Suburban Disposal should provide solid waste services twice a week; twice a week in the summer and once a week in the winter; or once a week all year.

Reynolds said one collection per week was not a viable option.

Wojyn, Mann and Marter said they would choose having two collections per week and one collection per week based on the time of year; Lewis and Robilotti said they would choose to continue two collections per week all year; and Francisco declined to comment.

Residents who were present indicated they supported having two collections per week all year.

Reynolds also supported having two collections per week. He said he did not want to disrupt the way residents are used to receiving service and he said the rates would be lower in 2022 because the borough has already paid for the first three months.

Following public input, the council members opted to keep two collections per week, with service provided by Suburban Disposal.

Manalapan zoners grant variance for office/warehouse uses in industrial park

MANALAPAN – The Manalapan Zoning Board of Adjustment has approved an application that proposed the construction of office/warehouse space in a residential zone.Ambe Holding, LLC, (Englishtown Industrial Park) applied to the zoning board for preliminary and final major site plan approval regarding a property that is partially in Manalapan and partially in Englishtown. The applicant sought approval to expand the existing industrial park by constructing four flex space office/warehouse buildings.The applicant also sought a u...

MANALAPAN – The Manalapan Zoning Board of Adjustment has approved an application that proposed the construction of office/warehouse space in a residential zone.

Ambe Holding, LLC, (Englishtown Industrial Park) applied to the zoning board for preliminary and final major site plan approval regarding a property that is partially in Manalapan and partially in Englishtown. The applicant sought approval to expand the existing industrial park by constructing four flex space office/warehouse buildings.

The applicant also sought a use variance for office/warehouse uses in the RE and R-20 zones in Manalapan where such uses are not permitted, according to a presentation that was made to the zoning board on March 3.

Testimony was presented that evening and was not met with significant objections from the board members, the board’s engineer and planner, nor members of the public, however, a technical issue with the public notice that had been provided prevented the board from voting on the application that evening.

The application was carried to the board’s April 7 meeting. Prior to that meeting Ambe Holding, LLC, provided a second public notice regarding the application.

When the zoning board meeting convened on April 7, no one from the public spoke and no additional testimony was provided by the applicant.

At that point, board members Adam Weiss, Robert Gregowicz, Joshua Shalikar, Terry Rosenthal, David Schertz and Chairman Stephen Leviton voted “yes” on a motion to approve the application.

During the March 3 meeting, the applicant was represented by attorney William Mehr, planner James Higgins, traffic engineer John Rea and engineer Bashkar Halari, who is the property manager of the Englishtown Industrial Park.

The industrial park is the former site of the Washington Forge cutlery factory. The property is 30 acres (8 acres in Englishtown and 22 acres in Manalapan).

Halari testified that the current uses at the site are not retail in nature. Vehicles coming to and leaving the site are primarily the employees of the existing businesses. That will remain the case with the new buildings, he said.

Testimony presented by the applicant’s representatives indicated that four new buildings would total 68,851 square feet (53,661 square feet of ground floor space and 15,190 square feet of mezzanine space).

Approximately 48,270 square feet of the total ground floor area/building footprint will be in Manalapan, with the remainder being in Englishtown. Two existing buildings will be removed to facilitate the proposed construction.

The property where the project is proposed is in the Residential Environmental (RE) and R-20 Single Family Suburban Residential zones in Manalapan and in the Industrial zone in Englishtown.

The largest of the four proposed buildings will have a gross floor area of 24,051 square feet, including 5,390 square feet of mezzanine space, and will straddle the border of Manalapan and Englishtown, according to the applicant.

The other three buildings (the first with a gross floor area of 13,740 square feet; the second with a gross floor area of 20,460 square feet; and the third with a gross floor area of 13,380 square feet) will be entirely in Manalapan.

The existing paved parking area on site is proposed to be expanded. A total of 260 parking spaces are required and 400 parking spaces will be provided.

Halari said landscaping that will be provided will screen the buildings from view.

“Our goal is to provide a year round buffer for residents. We think this plan provides good separation between residents and our uses,” he said.

Rea testified that the project has received preliminary approval in Englishtown and said final approval in the borough is pending. He said all access to the industrial park will be in Englishtown on Harrison Avenue and on Center Street.

The closest residential streets in Manalapan are Farm Tree Road, Hearthstone Drive and McGellaird’s Crossing Road, but Rea reiterated there is no direct access to the industrial park from Manalapan and said the plan “will have no impact on Manalapan’s street system. The plan will add about 40 peak hour trips through Englishtown.”

Higgins made several points during his presentation as he presented the case as to why the variance should be granted for commercial uses in a residential zone.

He said the property is not conducive to residential development as the zoning in Manalapan requires; the site has had industrial uses for many years; a substantial visual barrier has been proposed to block the site from residences in the area; and significant drainage improvements have been proposed.

The zoning board’s planner, Jennifer Beahm, did not take exception to Higgins’ testimony regarding the variance, and in response to a question from Beahm, Halari said the project would be constructed in two phases.

The board’s engineer, Brian Boccanfuso, did not take issue with the testimony and noted there will not be any retail uses at the site.

Boccanfuso said the New Jersey Department of Environmental Protection has fully approved the proposed storm water improvements and he said the plan complies with all applicable storm water management regulations.

Leviton said the applicant’s representatives have been meeting with Beahm and Boccanfuso since 2019 to address pertinent issues at the property and Boccanfuso confirmed that no concerns remain.

Leviton commended Halari for making plans to provide a fence and trees that will block the view of the buildings from the Manalapan side of the property.

Weiss called it “a good presentation on a property that is in need of redevelopment.”

Several residents of Hearthstone Drive asked questions of the applicant’s representatives when the meeting was opened to public comment.

Halari responded to one question by stating that the location where a new building will be constructed on Center Street is currently being cleaned of contamination that has existed at the property for several decades.

Len Marcu of Brick Township said he has been a tenant at the Englishtown Industrial Park for eight years. He complimented Halari as the site’s owner and said the property is well maintained.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.