BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Deal

ASK US ANYTHING!

732-741-1103

Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Deal, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

Basement Foundation Repair Deal, NJ
al super badge
guarantee-service
Guild Quality

Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Deal, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Deal, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Deal, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Deal, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Deal

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Deal:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Deal, NJ

Latest News in Deal, NJ

Newark schools: Come clean on this shady deal | Editorial

A private developer has agreed to remake a former hospital in Newark into a high school and lease it to the district, a shady and secretive deal that demands deeper scrutiny.Start with this: Why are both the district and the developer refusing to discuss the terms or answer any questions about their agreement? If this is a legitimate deal, why all the mystery?This is, after all, about public funds – $160 million in taxpayer funds being paid to a for-profit real estate firm for a 20-year lease. Is this a wise deal? Is it a...

A private developer has agreed to remake a former hospital in Newark into a high school and lease it to the district, a shady and secretive deal that demands deeper scrutiny.

Start with this: Why are both the district and the developer refusing to discuss the terms or answer any questions about their agreement? If this is a legitimate deal, why all the mystery?

This is, after all, about public funds – $160 million in taxpayer funds being paid to a for-profit real estate firm for a 20-year lease. Is this a wise deal? Is it an honest deal? It’s impossible to answer those questions with any certainty, given the suspicious stonewalling.

And to muddy the situation even more, last week the developer suddenly announced the deal is off, although the district has said no such thing, and presumably, neither side can just walk away from the contract. Again, why the mystery?

This lease was approved during a public hearing on Facebook last year in which the discussion of the lease terms was rushed through in less than three minutes. The assistant school business administrator, Jason Ballard, said the “district is going to ultimately receive a turnkey new facility,” and compared the project to the “average $134 million” that the SDA spent on the high schools in Camden, Trenton and Perth Amboy.

But in those projects, the districts owned the buildings. Among the questions Newark school officials still refuse to answer: How much, if any equity, are they gaining in the building after paying $160 million?

The superintendent and school board need to come clean. Superintendent Roger León spoke out publicly and called for a meeting when he learned that the developer on this project stands accused of violating the law by failing to pay laborers the area’s prevailing wage.

Yet when it comes to the basic terms of this deal, he and the school board are hunkering down and keeping mum. It may be that they don’t understand the terms themselves – perhaps they just trusted their broker. So bring the broker to a public meeting to justify this.

“They should be open about this. They should say, this is why we did it, this is the rationale,” said Mary Filardo from the nonprofit 21st Century School Fund, who has more than 20 years of experience on public-private partnerships to build schools.

We also asked the state Department of Education multiple times if the Commissioner approved this lease, as is required, and got no answer. States need to develop their capacity to evaluate these kinds of agreements by school districts, noted Filardo, who advocates for equitable spending and better oversight of school improvements in low-income districts. “They are really complicated,” she said – you need a lawyer reading these things, one who represents the public sector.

For instance: Why are property taxes being paid by the district on this school building leased in Newark, given that schools are normally exempt? And while it may be that the rent is fair, we need to know how much more the district is on the hook for in fixing up this building, given that the lease doesn’t account for furniture, fixtures or equipment.

Also, since the developer is responsible for all improvements on the building, who is going to make sure there are really $77 million worth of upgrades, as the lease says?

Above all, for a partnership like this to work, the district must take great pains “to create an environment where we could all trust each other” – doing everything out in the open and actively engaging the community, Filardo said. That means a need for “the business terms to be clear and defended” so the public can scrutinize them.

When Gov. Phil Murphy returned control of the schools to the city, the idea was to give citizens new power to control their district. They can’t do that if the superintendent closes them out of the discussion, and the board allows that to happen.

Our journalism needs your support. Please subscribe today to NJ.com.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

NJ Restaurants Offer Incentives, Remove Menu Items To Combat Inflation

NEW JERSEY — While unemployment is low in New Jersey, inflation has hit hard this year, and restaurants want to make sure people can still dine out. So they're trying to get creative in enticing patrons to come eat.Dana Lancellotti, the president of the New Jersey Restaurant and Hospitality Association, ...

NEW JERSEY — While unemployment is low in New Jersey, inflation has hit hard this year, and restaurants want to make sure people can still dine out. So they're trying to get creative in enticing patrons to come eat.

Dana Lancellotti, the president of the New Jersey Restaurant and Hospitality Association, told NJ 101.5 this week that restaurants are shifting around to keep prices reasonable. Because of higher labor and delivery costs, the prices of some meat and seafood options have climbed.

She also said some restaurants have removed high-priced items from their menus.

Other restaurants have added "COVID fees" or have added extra fees for using credit cards. But some offer lower prices for patrons who pay cash, because this helps the restaurants avoid their own fees.

Myron Mixon's Pitmaster Barbecue restaurant in Hoboken has a sign at the counter, "As an incentive for our customers we now offer an immediate discount to customers who pay cash. All prices posted and displayed in this business represent the Cash Discount Price."

"A Service Fee of 3.25 percent is applied to all non-cash purchases. We are grateful for your continued support as we strive to provide the same service and quality as you have become accustomed to."

Surcharges for credit card use are legal in New Jersey as long as they are disclosed ahead of time to customers, or near the point of purchase, according to the state. In fact, last month, 14 businesses got warning letters from the state of New Jersey for failing to disclose the fees ahead of time.

This past spring, inflation of items on restaurant menus rose higher than any times since the 1980s, said Restaurant Business Magazine.

But the state unemployment rate is low right now, at 3.7 percent.

Eating out often proves a treat to look forward to when times are tough.

As of this writing, the five-course nightly tasting menu at Elements in Princeton — once listed among the most expensive restaurants in New Jersey — remains at $129 per person.

Is there any place in New Jersey you'd still eat no matter what? Where can you get a favorite food at a reasonable price? Comment below!

Developer says deal to remake Newark hospital into high school is off

A developer who agreed to remake a former hospital in Newark into a high school and lease it to the district said Friday that the deal was off, and he would convert the building into apartments instead.“The lease is void,” developer Albert Nigri told NJ Advance Media in a phone interview Friday. “We’re turning the building into residential.”...

A developer who agreed to remake a former hospital in Newark into a high school and lease it to the district said Friday that the deal was off, and he would convert the building into apartments instead.

“The lease is void,” developer Albert Nigri told NJ Advance Media in a phone interview Friday. “We’re turning the building into residential.”

“The return on our investment would be much greater,” added Nigri, who heads Manhattan-based Summit Assets and is the managing member of its subsidiary, 155 Jefferson Street Urban Renewal LLC, which was developing the former hospital.

The LLC’s name is derived from the address of the former St. James Hospital, a 5-story, orange-brick specimen of Modern architecture towering over the corner of Jefferson and Elm streets amid the smaller, older townhouses of Newark’s Ironbound section.

Asked if he had informed the district of the decision to kill the deal, Nigri said he believed his partner had done so.

None of Newark’s nine Board of Education members responded to requests for comment. And a district spokesperson, Nancy Deering, declined to comment Friday, citing litigation by a separate tenant and a state labor complaint against Nigri.

Nigri and the board’s president, Dawn Haynes, signed a lease agreement in December calling for his firm to reconfigure the hospital with classrooms and other education space, offices, a gym and an auditorium, in time for occupancy by September 2023.

A press release issued following an unannounced groundbreaking ceremony in May quoted Schools SuperintendentRoger Le?n saying the facility would be known as the Newark High School of Architecture & Interior Design. He said it would offer classes in real estate, architecture, engineering, interior design, electrical systems, heating and ventilation, plumbing and other building trades.

The school would admit one new grade per year starting with its inaugural freshman class and build to a 9-12 high school by 2026.

But the project has been beset by legal and other snags.

In May, it was the subject of a complaint filed with the state asserting the developer had violated New Jersey law by failing to pay laborers the area’s prevailing wage, an hourly rate comparable to union pay that the state labor commissioner sets for non-union jobs.

The complaint was filed by Local 3 of the Laborers International Union of North America, or LiUNA, whose lawyer noted the irony of the situation in light of the school’s intended curriculum.

Tom Wright, a spokesperson for the labor department, confirmed there was “an open investigation,” but declined to elaborate. Nigri has denied underpaying laborers, insisting the prevailing wage law did not apply to the project because the school district hadn’t occupied the building, and the project remained a private enterprise.

Apart from the wage complaint, the owner of Olshin’s Pharmacy, which leases a smaller building on the hospital property, has a temporary restraining order against 155 Jefferson LLP granted by a state Superior Court judge. This after Olshin’s owner asserted the company tried to force her to vacate the space despite having 34 years left on her lease.

Nigri has countered that the pharmacy violated the terms of its lease by, among other things, making unauthorized alterations to the property.

Nigri said he was pulling out of the deal with the district when contacted by NJAM to explain the terms of the lease.

Among its provisions, the agreement calls for 155 Jefferson LLC to spend no more than $78 million to remodel the building, which the company would recoup from the district with an “ROI,” or return on investment, of 8%, in the form of lease payments over 20 years.

The payments would start at $6.2 million for the first year of the deal, paid in monthly installments, and increase automatically by 1.5% per year to $8.3 million by its 20th year.

After the initial 20 years, the district would have options to extend the lease twice, for an additional five years each, under similar monetary terms.

Altogether, the 20 years of payments would add up to $144 million, or $67 million more than the cost to remodel the building. Of course, inflation would eat up much of the value of that apparent profit. But on its face, at least, the difference would represent an 85% return, or more than 10 times the 8% rate specified in the lease.

Asked to reconcile the figures, Nigri seemed to acknowledge the apparent inconsistency of those or other terms.

“The numbers don’t make sense,” he said.

But he moved on before elaborating, declaring the lease void, its terms moot, and the deal to develop the school tossed out.

People familiar with school construction say a lease arrangement isn’t unheard of for traditional public school buildings and is common among charter schools, which in New Jersey receive per-pupil operating funds from the state but no money for buildings. So a lease agreement provides charter schools a space without demanding a large amount of up-front cash or credit that constructing a building on their own would, said David Malansky, CEO of Civic Builders, a Manhattan-based non-profit that finances charter building projects.

To pay for construction of regular public schools, districts typically seek voter approval to issue bonds, which are repaid through a school tax increase. A lack of bonding capacity or the desire to avoid a referendum are other reasons a district might choose a lease, Malansky said.

Another potential funding source is the state Schools Development Authority, or SDA, a state agency that provides low-interest loans to 31 largely poor, urban school districts in New Jersey formerly known as Abbott Districts, which include Newark. However, the SDA has been all but insolvent in recent years, and it was only last month that state lawmakers approved a $1.5 billion cash infusion for the agency.

David Sciarra, executive director of the Education Law Center in Newark, which advocates for the state’s urban districts, said the High School of Architecture & Interior Design would have to be approved by the state education commissioner, regardless of how the school was developed.

Sciarra noted that a resolution approved by the Newark school board had directed district officials to seek approval of the school from the commissioner. But he did not know whether approval had been granted.

A spokesperson for the Department of Education could not immediately say on Friday whether the school had been approved.

Nobody knows Jersey better than N.J.com. Sign up to get breaking news alerts straight to your inbox.

Note to readers: if you purchase something through one of our affiliate links we may earn a commission.

State launches new website to help N.J. residents to recover from future disasters like Ida

New Jersey has launched a new website to help residents, small businesses, nonprofits, and local governments get information on how to recover from a disaster and prepare for future storms.Gov. Phil Murphy announced the site — ...

New Jersey has launched a new website to help residents, small businesses, nonprofits, and local governments get information on how to recover from a disaster and prepare for future storms.

Gov. Phil Murphy announced the site — DisasterHelp.nj.gov — at an event Thursday commemorating the one-year anniversary of the remnants of Hurricane Ida devastating the state, as he pledged more help for residents still recovering from the storm.

The governor said the website will put all the information residents and businesses need in one place.

“It will also create an interactive create-your-own-disaster-recovery-plan tool on the homepage to help you more quickly identify the programs that are best suited to help you,” Murphy said, adding that the state is “looking to the future.”

The website includes information about assistance with food, shelter, mental health, and provides links to related aid programs.

Get politics news like this right to your inbox with the N.J. Politics newsletter. Add your email below and hit "subscribe"

New Jersey is also preparing to distribute about $283 million in federal Housing and Urban Development (HUD) community development block grant disaster recovery funds the state was awarded three months ago to help Ida survivors, Murphy said.

Officials have asked residents to complete a survey about what assistance they need to recover. The state has until Sept. 28 to submit a plan to the federal government.

Murphy said the money will help victims restore homes, displaced residents pay for rental costs, provide zero-interest loans to those with damaged rental properties to make repairs and develop resilient affordable housing.

The state will also provide $1 million for counseling and legal aid to homeowners and renters affected by Ida, Murphy said.

In addition, Murphy said the state will start an “aggressive push” to obtain New Jersey’s “fair share” of $3 billion in new FEMA grant funds for homeowners and local resilience projects.

Ida was one of a series of storms to slam New Jersey in recent years. Its anniversary comes about two months before the 10-year anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, which devastated the state in 2012.

New Jersey has been hit by significant flooding in 10 of the last 21 years, according to the state Department of Environmental Protection. Officials and environmentalists warn that storms are expected to become more frequent and volatile because of climate change.

Please subscribe now and support the local journalism YOU rely on and trust.

Seton Hall Prep football team to show its stuff before Irish eyes in 2023

Seton Hall Prep isn’t certain yet whom its opponent will be next August 24, but the Pirates are still perfectly willing to go a long way to play them.Seton Hall has announced it will take part in the 2023 Global Ireland Football Tournament next summer in Dublin. The Pirates are scheduled to take on their yet-to-be-named foe Aug. 25, one day prior to the headline college matchup between Notre Dame and Navy at Aviva Stadium in Dublin as part of the Aer Lingus College Football Series.“We are honored to be traveling abr...

Seton Hall Prep isn’t certain yet whom its opponent will be next August 24, but the Pirates are still perfectly willing to go a long way to play them.

Seton Hall has announced it will take part in the 2023 Global Ireland Football Tournament next summer in Dublin. The Pirates are scheduled to take on their yet-to-be-named foe Aug. 25, one day prior to the headline college matchup between Notre Dame and Navy at Aviva Stadium in Dublin as part of the Aer Lingus College Football Series.

“We are honored to be traveling abroad to open our 2023 season, which will be an invaluable experience for our student-athletes to explore a new culture and engage in all that Ireland has to offer, Seton Hall athletic director Larry Baggitt said. “I also look forward to your program alumni joining and supporting our team for this incredible opportunity.”

The Prep was home at the Brendan P. Tevlin Memorial Field in West Orange for its 2022 opener last Saturday, though that was an exciting experience, as well - a thrilling, 32-27, upset over Delbarton. Junior quarterback Liam Londergan connected with junior wide receiver Julius Vicari on a 14-yard TD pass with 24 seconds remaining to seal the comeback win over the Green Wave, then ranked No. 10 in the NJ.com Top 20. Seton Hall was No. 15 and has since climbed to No. 12.

Presumably, both Londergan and Vicari would still be in uniform for the Pirates next August in Dublin, as would multi-talented junior defensive back Jaylen McClain. The 6-0, 185-pounder already has secured 22 Division 1 offers, including Rutgers, Michigan, Stanford, Georgia and Penn State.

Notre Dame is not yet on that offer list for McClain, but sure may be come game time in 11 months.

“This is a historic experience for our school, as this is the first time a program will participate in an official competition outside of the country, said Michael Gallo, Seton Hall’s headmaster. “To be included with institutions such as Notre Dame and the Naval Academy is an amazing privilege.”

The N.J. High School Sports newsletter now appearing in mailboxes 5 days a week. Sign up now to be among the first to get all the boys and girls sports you care bout, straight to your inbox each weekday. To add your name, click here.

Thank you for relying on us to provide the journalism you can trust. Please consider supporting NJ.com with a subscription.

Disclaimer:

This website publishes news articles that contain copyrighted material whose use has not been specifically authorized by the copyright owner. The non-commercial use of these news articles for the purposes of local news reporting constitutes "Fair Use" of the copyrighted materials as provided for in Section 107 of the US Copyright Law.