BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Bradley Beach

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home’s issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey’s one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won’t rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won’t have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. With Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Bradley Beach, it’s no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

Service Areas

foundation repair

The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won’t be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren’t like anybody else’s, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won’t find any “one-size-fits-all” solutions here, and we wouldn’t have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can’t handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We’re talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home’s value and your family’s health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation’s walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation’s interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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Basement Waterproofing in Bradley Beach

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn’t in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement’s water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home’s walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don’t wait to address the moisture developing in your basement – call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It’s easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don’t know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Bradley Beach:

Clay Bowl Effect

The “Clay Bowl” Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or “bowl” effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home’s value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a “prevention over repair” mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We’re not in the business of putting a “Band-Aid” on your water problem – we want to fix your issue completely, so you don’t have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don’t usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home’s foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren’t clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home’s foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you’re thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn’t retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it’s best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it’s hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor’s. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you’re having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won’t do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don’t let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

Get it Done Righ

Latest News in Bradley Beach

As Delta variant spreads, should New Jerseyans mask up again?

As the highly contagious Delta variant sweeps across New Jersey, new COVID-19 infection totals are shooting higher, almost doubling over the past four days.On July 12, the New Jersey Department of Health reported 227 new PCR cases. On July 13, that number increased by 106 cases to a total of 333 reported PCR cases and 371 PCR cases were reported on July 14. On Thursday, the state was reporting 441 new PCR cases, the highest number in a single day since May 22.While the number of new cases pales in comparison to the height of th...

As the highly contagious Delta variant sweeps across New Jersey, new COVID-19 infection totals are shooting higher, almost doubling over the past four days.

On July 12, the New Jersey Department of Health reported 227 new PCR cases. On July 13, that number increased by 106 cases to a total of 333 reported PCR cases and 371 PCR cases were reported on July 14. On Thursday, the state was reporting 441 new PCR cases, the highest number in a single day since May 22.

While the number of new cases pales in comparison to the height of the pandemic when the state was reporting thousands of new infections per day, the numbers do reflect a trend that is being seen across the United States.

The state is also seeing an increase in its rate of transmission. On Thursday, the RT was reported at 1.16, that compares to a week ago when it was 0.92. Any number above one indicates that each new case is leading to more than one additional infection.

Meanwhile the number of people hospitalized with COVID-19 is back up to 325, which is where it was at the end of June.

According to the state Department of Health\'s COVID-19 Dashboad, the Delta variant made up over 40% of all new variant cases in June, making it the predominant strain in New Jersey. There are also reports the Delta variant has mutated into what is now being called the Delta-plus variant.

During an appearance Wednesday on CNBC\'s "Squawk Box," Dr. Scott Gottlieb, former head of the Food and Drug Administration, said the Delta variant surge will continue to build and it may not peak until the end of September, adding "the worst is yet to come."

He also said vaccines may not be quite as effective in stopping Delta-plus infections as they are with other forms of COVID.

So what does all of this mean?

“It is concerning because the virus has continued to evolve to forms that have become increasingly more transmissible,” said Dr. Martin Blaser, an infectious disease expert and the director of the Center for Advanced Biotechnology and Medicine at Rutgers University.

He said as the virus continues to mutate, it is not clear what will happen next.

“There are a lot of unknowns here,” he said. “This is a developing story, this is emerging, the Delta virus is kind of exploding on our shores.”

Blaser said that while the Pfizer, Moderna and Johnson & Johnson vaccines may not be quite as effective against the evolving Delta variant as they were against the original form of COVID that first appeared in New Jersey 16 months ago, vaccination is still the best tool we have to stop the virus.

“Vaccination is the best protection that people can do. This Delta virus is finding people who are unvaccinated,” said Blaser.

At the same time, he noted, with the COVID landscape rapidly changing there are new questions about what constitutes safe behavior.

Blaser, who is vaccinated, said while he wasn\'t wearing masks for a few weeks, he is now in certain situations.

"I’ve started wearing them when I go to the supermarket, when I’m near people, because the vaccine efficiency has been fantastic against the old strain but against the new strain it’s not quite as good. We don’t know exactly how much worse it is,” Blaser said.

He also pointed out that just like with the other strains of COVID-19, those with the Delta variant might not even know they have it.

“What makes this virus very transmissible is that some of the people who have it don’t have any symptoms at all, so you could be standing next to somebody who looks perfectly well and they’re sending the virus in your direction.”

Blaser stressed it’s important for everyone to understand the pandemic is not over.

“This virus is not going away,” he said. “The only way we can make it go away is if enough people get vaccinated so that the virus has nowhere to go. People who are doubting whether to get vaccinated or not, they should get vaccinated as soon as possible.”

You can contact reporter David Matthau at [email protected].

Seven boardwalk games and how they can be stacked against you

Gallery Credit: Jeff Deminski

Ring toss

The rings are often just a smudge wider than the neck of the bottle and made of hard plastic that will be extra bouncy. If the carny makes it look easy it’s because he’s using a slightly wider ring than you’ll get and dropping them from his angle, more straight down, not your angle, which is more of an arc.

Balloons are often under-inflated to make them less likely to burst and the darts they give you can be special, lighter darts with dulled points.

Shoot the star

We all know this one don’t we? Entirely shoot out the red star on the white paper with a BB gun and win a prize. But those BBs may be smaller than the usual, the sight on the rifle might be altered and the air pressure in the gun might be reduced.

Balls can be over-inflated to make them bounce off rims more. The rims may be more oval than round. They may be set higher than a regulation hoop. Items behind the hoop may be specially set there to throw off your depth perception.

Milk bottle pyramid

Knock ‘me all down to win. Catch is the bottom row can be weighted inside with lead, the softball you’re given filled with lighter cork, and there might be a backdrop to prevent them all from falling.

Basket Softball Toss

Seems so easy. Just get two softballs to land into a tilted bushel basket to win. First of all, the tubs are made of a very bouncy plastic. To lure you in the barker shows how easy by throwing the first softball in from HIS side of the counter. (Far easier angle.) Then hands you the second. You get it in because the first one being there deadens the basket’s bounce. So now you pay up and play for real. But with the basket being empty you’ll never get that first one in from your vantage point.

No! You’re saying even the little toddler’s catch a duck with a fishing pole game is rigged? In a psychological sense. While everyone wins, the number on the bottom of the duck indicates what prize you win. There’s often one really coveted prize and the rest all junk. Often 99% of the ducks are marked to win the junk prize in order to keep your kid playing for the big one.

Oh, the humidity! Summer sun and storms return to NJ Wednesday

Tuesday was a weird weather day. The northern 75 percent of New Jersey was shrouded in fog and clouds, keeping temperatures stuck in the 70s all day. A welcome respite from the heat. Although it was still incredibly humid.Meanwhile, sunshine in South Jersey pushed thermometers to around 90 degrees. Also incredibly humid.As fog and low clouds depart on Wednesday, skies will brighten. We return to more typical summertime weather, with both heat and humidity. And an almost-daily chance of thunderstorms.When will the ...

Tuesday was a weird weather day. The northern 75 percent of New Jersey was shrouded in fog and clouds, keeping temperatures stuck in the 70s all day. A welcome respite from the heat. Although it was still incredibly humid.

Meanwhile, sunshine in South Jersey pushed thermometers to around 90 degrees. Also incredibly humid.

As fog and low clouds depart on Wednesday, skies will brighten. We return to more typical summertime weather, with both heat and humidity. And an almost-daily chance of thunderstorms.

When will the horrendous humidity substantially go away? Eh, maybe early next week. If we\'re lucky.

Most of New Jersey is starting the day still stuck in the clouds. Dense fog has enveloped most of the state - all but far northern and far southern New Jersey, really. Visibility is below a quarter-mile in spots, so don\'t be afraid to slow down as you drive through the clouds. A Dense Fog Advisory covers most of the state until 9 a.m.

It takes very specific conditions for long-lasting fog to develop. Relative humidity must be near 100%. Winds must be practically calm. And a stationary front draped over the middle of New Jersey has kept our air mass extra stagnant.

That front will lift north on Wednesday, allowing temperatures to rise and relative humidity levels to drop. That will lead to a drastic reduction in fog and low clouds through the mid to late morning hours.

By Wednesday afternoon, the entire state will return to seasonable, sultry, summer-ish weather. With breaks of sun and high humidity, temperatures will push to about 85 to 90 degrees. The "heat index" may reach as high as 95 - just below the "danger zone" in urban areas.

There is one additional "fly in the soup" in Wednesday\'s forecast: The return of thunderstorms. After about 4 or 5 p.m. through Wednesday evening, we will have to watch the western sky for a broken line of storms.

Not everyone in the state will experience a thunderstorm. In fact, several models paint a pretty tame scenario, with storms largely fizzling by the time they reach the coast. Still, if you do encounter a storm, locally heavy rainfall could lead to quick flooding or ponding issues. Gusty winds and dangerous cloud-to-ground lightning are possible too.

Clearing skies will take over after Midnight. Low temperatures will bottom out in the sticky lower 70s.

I had been hoping that Thursday would feature a subtle decrease in dew points, dropping humidity levels from "tropical" to "just sticky". Now I\'m not so sure that will play out. Even if it does, you may not even notice.

Still, with mostly sunny skies and no rain in the forecast, Thursday does look like a decent mid-summer, mid-July day.

High temperatures will push into the upper 80s to around 90 degrees.

Definitely another "air conditioner day". Possibly the hottest day of the week.

Morning lows in the 70s. Afternoon highs in the lower 90s (away from the coast). In urbanized areas of northeast and southwest NJ, the heat index could climb into the upper 90s. Yuck.

A few thunderstorms may pop up Friday evening. But at the moment, they look isolated - few and far between.

Mid-July is, on average, New Jersey\'s hottest part of the year. So it\'s truly appropriate that we start the upcoming weekend with more sticky, steamy weather.

Thermometers will likely surge to 90 or better for most of the state by lunchtime Saturday, with increasing clouds. Humidity looks incredibly uncomfortable.

And then a slow-moving front will lead to some unsettled weather. I think we face two or three waves of scattered rain, between Saturday afternoon and Sunday night. According to the latest model guidance, the wettest, stormiest periods look to be Saturday evening and Sunday afternoon - however that timeline is subject to change.

Because of the rain and clouds around on Sunday, high temperatures across the state will probably end up closer to 80 degrees. Notably below normal for this time of year.

There are two scenarios that could play out for early next week. On the one hand, if that slow-moving front stalls completely, another area of low pressure could lead an extended period of rain on Monday. On the other hand, if that front makes a clean pass by Monday morning, we will finally get a taste of drier air. As a sworn enemy of thick humidity, you probably know which solution I would prefer.

Don\'t worry heat fans, we\'re far from done with the "dog days of summer" heat and humidity. Long-range models show a return to excessive (if not dangerous) conditions by late July.

Dan Zarrow is Chief Meteorologist for Townsquare Media New Jersey. Follow him on Facebook or Twitter for the latest forecast and realtime weather updates.

NJ restaurants post-pandemic: Here are the changes they’re keeping, ditching

Plenty of businesses have struggled in New Jersey throughout the pandemic but the restaurant industry took an especially hard hit.As the COVID crisis winds down, many eateries have embraced what they have learned over the past 17 months.Here\'s a look at some of the changes that restaurants are ditching or keeping.Dana Lancellotti, the president and CEO of the New Jersey Restaurant and Hospitality Association, said that while paper menus have made a comeback, a lot of restaurants have decided to keep using QR codes....

Plenty of businesses have struggled in New Jersey throughout the pandemic but the restaurant industry took an especially hard hit.

As the COVID crisis winds down, many eateries have embraced what they have learned over the past 17 months.

Here\'s a look at some of the changes that restaurants are ditching or keeping.

Dana Lancellotti, the president and CEO of the New Jersey Restaurant and Hospitality Association, said that while paper menus have made a comeback, a lot of restaurants have decided to keep using QR codes.

“I think that benefits everybody mutually because menus, they have to be replaced and cleaned and all of that so it’s kind of nice to have the option of just using your phone and getting a menu up right away," she said.

She pointed out having electronic menus can also give restaurants more flexibility in updating their specials, adding or subtracting different dishes in a snap.

Lancellotti said another carry-over from the earlier days of pandemic that people seem to really enjoy is the expansion of outdoor dining onto sidewalks and parking lots.

She said this increases the number of tables a restaurant has, which can expand their business opportunities.

According to Lancellotti, ordering takeout from restaurants has also continued to be a popular option, even as indoor capacity limits have been lifted.

“More fine dining takeout is available now than we ever thought of before and the ordering process has been streamlined," she said.

She pointed websites have been improved with expanded delivery options, however that can add cost to an order because restaurants have to pay delivery services.

Lancellotti said while restaurants are in much better shape now than they have been for the past 17 months, the labor shortage continues to be a very significant problem.

She said in some restaurants, there are open tables but there is still a half hour wait to be seated.

“The reason for that is not because the restaurant doesn’t have their act together. It’s because they don’t have staff to cover the amount of tables that they would be able to fill," she said.

This means restaurants are not maximizing their opportunity because they just can’t get the staff to come in, right as they are trying to come back from a prolonged economic disaster.

Lancellotti said there are fears the labor shortage, which she described as a crisis, will hurt the restaurant industry long term because customers become frustrated when they have to wait to get seated and served, and some may decide to not return.

3 million NJ residents actually living in poverty, report says

The Census Bureau reported late last year that nearly 800,000 New Jerseyans were living in poverty in 2019.A report released Sunday suggests the actual number is way more than that."We have calculated some 2.9 million residents, including about 800,000 children," Shivi Prasad, director of the Poverty Research Institute, told New Jersey 101.5.The Institute, part of Legal Services of New Jersey, in its new report tries to shift some o...

The Census Bureau reported late last year that nearly 800,000 New Jerseyans were living in poverty in 2019.

A report released Sunday suggests the actual number is way more than that.

"We have calculated some 2.9 million residents, including about 800,000 children," Shivi Prasad, director of the Poverty Research Institute, told New Jersey 101.5.

The Institute, part of Legal Services of New Jersey, in its new report tries to shift some of the conversation about poverty toward the many individuals in the Garden State who are working full-time but are still unable to afford the most basic needs to survive.

"For New Jerseyans, the harsh reality is that the cost of just getting by — with no frills, no savings for college or retirement or unexpected repairs — is at least three times more than the official federal poverty numbers as reported by the census," said LSNJ President Dawn Miller.

The study uses a cost-of-living-sensitive model to determine the "true poverty level" in New Jersey. Faced with the third highest cost of living in the country, the report said, many New Jersey residents are getting "overlooked."

"Obviously one dollar in New Jersey will not buy you as many resources as one dollar elsewhere," Prasad said. "What we\'re trying to say here is that there needs to be a geographical variation in the threshold, because obviously the costs are not the same everywhere."

The report goes further than state-to-state comparisons and shows how drastically costs can change from county to county in the Garden State.

No matter where you are in the state, though, true poverty is at least 2.5 times greater than what federal numbers would suggest, the report said.

In New Jersey, a three-person family with an income at the federal poverty level ($20,598) uses at least 84% of family income on housing, the report notes. They are left with $3,275 annually or $273 monthly to afford other essential needs.

Getting beyond the true poverty level is a challenge for many, according to the report. Using the minimum wage rate in 2019, the report said a single parent with two children would need to work more than three full-time minimum wage jobs to meet the threshold.

"We need to understand and acknowledge that the poverty measure is flawed, especially for high-cost states," Prasad said. "We are being shortchanged here in New Jersey."

Prasad said the Institute\'s report will hopefully light a spark under leaders who can make a difference. Beyond reconsidering the definition and calculation of poverty, recommendations in the report call for improving employment earnings and opportunities, and reexamining public assistance programs.

NJ school underfunding means less experienced, fewer teachers: report

It\'s no secret that many schools across New Jersey are underfunded when you consider what should be doled out based on the state\'s formula.But in a report released Wednesday, Garden State residents get a glimpse of the real consequences for students and their futures when schools don\'t get enough funding to educate New Jersey\'s youth.Overall, according to the report from New Jersey Policy Perspective, students in highly funded schools enjoy more curricular offerings and more experienced teachers than students in schools tha...

It\'s no secret that many schools across New Jersey are underfunded when you consider what should be doled out based on the state\'s formula.

But in a report released Wednesday, Garden State residents get a glimpse of the real consequences for students and their futures when schools don\'t get enough funding to educate New Jersey\'s youth.

Overall, according to the report from New Jersey Policy Perspective, students in highly funded schools enjoy more curricular offerings and more experienced teachers than students in schools that are not adequately funded.

Underfunded districts, meanwhile, are likely to employ fewer staff members per student, according to the report, which used New Jersey Department of Education data.

"And so, the education that they\'re receiving is just fundamentally different than the education of children who are in much more well-resourced schools," said Mark Weber, report author and special analyst for education policy at NJPP, a nonpartisan think tank. "If we believe that education is a path toward having equal opportunity in life, then we have to make sure that the education that kids receive is just as good in some districts as it is in others."

New Jersey\'s school funding law, the School Funding Reform Act of 2008, sets targets for districts based on their capacity to raise local revenue, and their needs — students in poverty and English language learners, for example, require more funding to equalize education opportunities.

"Unfortunately, the state has never fully funded the SFRA," the report says. "As a result, many districts in New Jersey must make do with revenues that are less than what the state’s law says they need."

The report, titled The Consequences of School Underfunding, specifically notes that, on average, a teacher in a highly funded K-8 district will have over three years more experience than a teacher in a severely underfunded district. The experience bump is around two years, on average, when you compare teachers in highly funded K-12 districts to those in severely underfunded districts.

Severely underfunded K-12 districts employ an average of 9.4 staff members per 100 students, as opposed to 12.9 staffers per 100 students in highly funded districts, the report states. There are fewer arts teachers, music teachers, school nurses, support staff, and teachers for subjects such as foreign languages, in districts with the most inadequate funding.

"The first thing we have to do is get ourselves in a position where we\'re fully funding this formula. Then we need to step back and make sure that the formula itself is correct," Weber said. "I think now is a very good time, especially coming out of the pandemic."

The report recommends "recalibrating" the School Funding Reform Act to address the disparities uncovered by the report. Weber said he supports a proposed law that establishes a School Funding Formula Evaluation Task Force. It was unanimously passed by the full Senate in late June.

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