BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Bradley Beach

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Bradley Beach, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Bradley Beach, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Bradley Beach, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Bradley Beach, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Bradley Beach, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Bradley Beach

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Bradley Beach:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Bradley Beach, NJ

Latest News in Bradley Beach, NJ

'Special vibe': See how Middletown native upended The James hotel in Bradley Beach

Special to the Asbury Park PressBRADLEY BEACH - Growing up both industrious and creative, Middletown native George DiStefano gravitated to projects that allowed him to combine his business savvy with his love of design. And he found that perfect blend as the owner of The James, a boutique hotel in Bradley Beach that he took over in July 2021.“My father raised my brothers and me to have a ver...

Special to the Asbury Park Press

BRADLEY BEACH - Growing up both industrious and creative, Middletown native George DiStefano gravitated to projects that allowed him to combine his business savvy with his love of design. And he found that perfect blend as the owner of The James, a boutique hotel in Bradley Beach that he took over in July 2021.

“My father raised my brothers and me to have a very strong work ethic and I always worked as a kid,” recalled DiStefano, 30, a Bradley Beach resident who held jobs in the restaurant and catering industry throughout his middle and high school years.

After spending his first year of college at the University of St. Andrews in Scotland, DiStefano transferred to Monmouth University in West Long Branch for his remaining terms and graduated with a degree in finance — all while juggling near-full-time work for his father’s construction management company in Manhattan at the same time.

Jobs in investment banking and the launch of his own property management and maintenance company, Mid City Management, followed after graduation, but by 2021, DiStefano felt the lure of property development calling him.

“I’d always had an interest in design and architecture and the way a beautifully curated room can make people feel, but I wasn’t exactly sure what kind of project I wanted to pursue,” he said.

Intrigued by the prospect of buying a hospitality venue or bed and breakfast inn, DiStefano began searching online for commercial properties and found the Sandcastle Inn in Bradley Beach — a B&B that he would ultimately buy, rename The James Hotel, and renovate from top to bottom.

“James Bradley was the original owner of the property and the founder of Bradley Beach, so that was the genesis of the name. It’s a beautiful three-story Victorian home built in 1904, just a block and a half from the beach, and we wanted to preserve its history,” he said of the property he found in May 2021 and purchased just weeks later.

Put up for sale after its former owners decided to move on, “it was an operating B&B and the owners were lovely and had maintained it beautifully, though it was a bit of a different style than ours,” DiStefano said of what was then a main house (where the previous owners had resided), a side house with nine guest rooms, and a standalone, three-bedroom bungalow.

Using money saved from his other full-time jobs, he bought the property in July 2021 — just in time to oversee the full docket of bookings that the previous owners had taken for the inn’s busy summer season.

“We had a full house on July 4th and the former owners graciously stayed on that weekend to help me transition,” DiStefano said. “After that, I continued to run things as they were for the remainder of the summer, then shut down in October to begin a massive reconstruction, which took on a life of its own.”

'Utilized every inch of the space'

Undertaking the project with his best friend and interior designer Sebastian Zuchowicki, “we gutted the interior down to the studs, refinished existing floors or installed new ones, repainted, redid all of the bathrooms, replaced all of the doors and hardware, and expanded some rooms into suites,” DiStefano said.

By opening the quarters where the previous owners had lived, “we created seven new guest rooms that hadn’t been there before and utilized every inch of the space to make it feel expansive,” he continued. “We also brought in all new furniture — a mix of vintage, custom, and new pieces — and created a central theme while making every room different through a unique item of décor, such as a special lamp, color or piece of art to help each space convey its own feeling and visceral experience.”

In contrast to the impersonal hotel rooms that populate many of the nation’s hospitality venues, “I like the vibe different spaces can create and the opportunity for every room to make you feel something,” DiStefano explained. “I also love art and wanted The James’ pieces to feel like a personal collection in someone’s home.”

Following an eight-month renovation, The James reopened this April and has enjoyed a sold-out season, welcoming guests who largely hail from New York City, North Jersey and Philadelphia.

“In peak season, our rooms start at $300 for a minimum two-night stay and include breakfast, and our back bungalow has its own private garden and rents for roughly $5,000 a week,” he said.

“We also have indoor and outdoor breakfast seating for 40 people, including our 1,000-square-foot wraparound covered porch, and we offer a great breakfast menu that includes everything from our version of the iconic pork roll, egg and cheese sandwich to desiccated coconut French toast made with sourdough bread from New York City’s Balthazar Bakery on the weekends and elevated continental breakfasts featuring homemade pastries, muffins, and crumb cakes during the week,” he said. “We try to use locally sourced and organic ingredients or materials wherever possible — even down to our specially crafted curtains and linens handmaid by a local seamstress.”

“Ultimately, there’s nothing else like us in this market,” DiStefano said. “We’re not a kitschy B&B or a generic hotel. Rather, we offer an intimate curated experience that guests won’t get anywhere else.”

Thanks to their guest service, positive word of mouth, and thoughtful attention to detail — which resulted in glowing writeups in everything from the New York Times Style Magazine to Surface and Forbes — “business has been great this summer and we have bookings through December,” DiStefano said. “A number of guests who stayed with us in the beginning of the summer booked a second or even a third visit at the end of the summer and many others reserved rooms with us for next year before they left.”

'I love creating'

DiStefano credits the hotel’s success to many things.

Among them, “we have an amazing team of 15 employees, including our general manager, Mary Wiernasz, who has 30 years of hospitality experience,” he said. “In addition, Bradley Beach is a quintessential coastal town with a wonderful community feel and our property blends right into the neighborhood. It’s a great destination for people who want to kick back and enjoy a relaxing experience at the beach.”

Among the challenges of his role, DiStefano admits to obsessing about every detail, from the property’s vintage salt shakers to its seasonal landscaping. “We want people to see different things when they come and I’m always thinking about the next thing,” he said.

But he relishes the opportunity to flex his creative muscle and even craft his own furniture and décor.

“I love creating and changing up pieces — that brings me joy,” he said. “And I love that people ask us about our hardware, furniture and artwork all the time and leave feeling inspired to do something like that in their own home.”

While he’s thrilled for guests to seek out The James and enjoy its many nooks and crannies, DiStefano hopes it will help spur on other local investment. “Bradley Beach is a beautiful town and this hotel will hopefully inspire others to invest in or start a business here and partake in our tight-knit community. That sense of pride and belonging is how towns thrive.”

As a proud owner carrying on a historic legacy, “it’s so rewarding to see people appreciating all of the tiny details of our space,” said DiStefano, who hopes that The James will be the first of many boutique hotels he’s able to infuse with new life. “In the end, I love creating an experience for people — a special vibe that they feel from the second they step onto the property to the time they leave, and long after that.”

The James Hotel

Location: 204 Third Ave., Bradley Beach

Phone: 732-774-2875

Owner: George DiStefano

Opened: July 2021

First Public Reading of "Free Palestine" by Gary Morgenstein to take place in Bradley Beach

(BRADLEY BEACH, NJ) -- The first public reading of award-winning playwright Gary Morgenstein’s explosive new play Free Palestine - a probe into issues torn from the front-pages of newspapers: academic freedom, political correctness, free speech, and the perils of parenting, all triggered by the firing of a Jewish teacher of Israeli-Palestinian studies for not being “balanced enough”—will premiere at Congregation ...

(BRADLEY BEACH, NJ) -- The first public reading of award-winning playwright Gary Morgenstein’s explosive new play Free Palestine - a probe into issues torn from the front-pages of newspapers: academic freedom, political correctness, free speech, and the perils of parenting, all triggered by the firing of a Jewish teacher of Israeli-Palestinian studies for not being “balanced enough”—will premiere at Congregation Agudath Achim, 301 McCabe Avenue in Bradley Beach, on Sunday, September 4 at 7:00pm.

Directed by Bernice Garfield-Szita, the reading features Jackie Kusher (Adam Seitz); Tracy Howard (Estie Seitz); Tavea Sanderson (Vanessa Bickford); Arthur Gregory Pugh (Reggie Bickford); TJ Coan (Preston Tyler) and Kristina McKinney (Nadia Ruiz), with Jane Denoble handling stage directions.

There will be a talkback and dessert reception following the reading. Tickets are $10 made payable to Congregation Agudath Achim.

Gary Morgenstein’s novels and plays have been featured in national media from The New York Times, Entertainment Weekly, Parade Magazine, the New York Post, and Sports Illustrated to NPR. An award-winning playwright, Morgenstein’s multi-generational drama A Tomato Can’t Grow in the Bronx about a Jewish working-class family in 1968 has been nominated for six 2022 Perry Awards by the NJACT including Best Original Play following its April premiere at Center Players in Freehold. The funny drama will premiere December 2-17 at the Chain Theater in Manhattan.

Morgenstein’s Broadway World award-winning (for Best Play) A Black and White Cookie, depicting the unlikely friendship between a conservative African American newsstand owner and a politically radical Jew, premiered in July at New York City’s The Tank theater and was hailed as “fascinating” and “a heartwarming story”. An accomplished novelist, his books include the critically-acclaimed dystopian political novels - beginning in 2098 after America has lost World War Three - A Mound Over Hell (“1984 Meets Shoeless Joe”) and A Fastball for Freedom (“a dystopian Field of Dreams”), bhcpress.com.

Friday, September 02, 2022 @ 6:00pm Quakertown, NJ 08868category: theatreClick here for full description Saturday, September 03, 2022 @ 2:00pmShakespeare Theatre Of NJ - F.M. Kirby Shakespeare Theatre36 Madison Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940category: theatreClick here for full description Saturday, September 03, 2022 @ 8:00pmShakespeare Theatre Of NJ - F.M. Kirby Shakespeare Theatre36 Madison Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940category: theatreClick here for full description Sunday, September 04, 2022 @ 2:00pmShakespeare Theatre Of NJ - F.M. Kirby Shakespeare Theatre36 Madison Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940category: theatreClick here for full description Sunday, September 04, 2022 @ 7:30pmShakespeare Theatre Of NJ - F.M. Kirby Shakespeare Theatre36 Madison Avenue, Madison, NJ 07940category: theatreClick here for full description Thursday, September 08, 2022 @ 8:00pmPremiere Stages - Bauer Boucher Theatre Center1000 Morris Avenue, Union, NJ 07083category: theatreClick here for full description Friday, September 09, 2022 @ 8:00pmSouth Orange Performing Arts Center (SOPAC)One Sopac Way, South Orange, NJ 07079category: comedyClick here for full description Friday, September 09, 2022 @ 8:00pmPremiere Stages - Bauer Boucher Theatre Center1000 Morris Avenue, Union, NJ 07083category: theatreClick here for full description

Community center plan in Bradley Beach heavily opposed, survey says

BRADLEY BEACH — Results of a digital survey conducted by the borough to assess the options and priorities of the community on the future of the former First Methodist Church property have revealed that 74.9 percent of respondents oppose the proposed project. The analysis shows that 25.1 percent of respondents said they favor the project.Residents will have a second opportunity to voice their opinion on whether the borough should renovate the vacant structure as a community center, on a non-binding referendum question set to appe...

BRADLEY BEACH — Results of a digital survey conducted by the borough to assess the options and priorities of the community on the future of the former First Methodist Church property have revealed that 74.9 percent of respondents oppose the proposed project. The analysis shows that 25.1 percent of respondents said they favor the project.

Residents will have a second opportunity to voice their opinion on whether the borough should renovate the vacant structure as a community center, on a non-binding referendum question set to appear on the Nov. 8 general election ballot.

Miranda Nash of Communications Design Consulting analyzed the survey results and presented the “Community Survey Analysis Highlights” document to the council.

The analysis of the survey is available to the public at bradleybeachnj.gov under Bradley Beach Announcements.

In a message on the borough’s website to residents regarding the survey results, Mayor Larry Fox said he was excited by the response rate of 927 verified submissions and he thanked all respondents.

“The comments you provided will be considered and evaluated. We have a wonderful, responsive community,” said Mayor Fox.

The survey was open from July 15 to 31. Access was accompanied by clarifying information about the possible development of the property, including a proposed budget.

The survey was accessible on computers, tablets and mobile phones with internet connectivity. Digital access to the survey was also available at the Bradley Beach Public Library.

Data for the survey states that there were 927 verified responses with 88 percent being residential property owners.

Some 99.8 percent responded in English and there were 604 mobile device responses, 303 desktop responses and 20 tablet responses.

The survey included a detailed chart titled “Local Tax impact to the taxpayer for 319 LaReine Avenue,” which stated that there are 1,931 taxed resident properties in Bradley Beach as of 2022.

The chart identified mean and median assessed property values and calculated the 10-year cumulative cost to the taxpayer.

The chart included a note, “Through 2034, the tax burden increases to a total of $14.5 million. This figure includes all projected operational costs (property acquisition, repairs, and operating) through 2034.”

Survey respondents were asked to confirm they understand the tax implications of the project after being shown this charge and 93.5% of respondents said ‘yes.’

The question voters will see in November is as follows: “Should the Borough of Bradley Beach renovate its Borough-owned real property and currently vacant structure located at 319 Lareine Ave, Block 41, Lot 1, in order to create a municipal community center, at an estimated cost of $10,000,000?

“Voting yes means you want the Borough to take the necessary steps to renovate the public property and vacant structure located at 319 Lareine Avenue, Block 41, Lot 1, in order to create a municipal community center, at an estimated cost of $10,000,000.”

“Voting no means you do not want the borough to take the necessary steps to renovate the public property and vacant structure located at 319 Lareine Ave, Block 41, Lot 1, in order to create a municipal community center, at an estimated cost of $10,000,000.”

Respondents were asked to rank six potential borough projects in order of their interest/needs.

Main Street improvements were ranked as number one in the survey, followed by beach and dune improvements, sewer system upgrades, bulkhead for storm resilience and public works consolidation. Trailing at number six was the 319 LaReine Ave. Community Center project.

Respondents were then asked if they would like to leave a comment or opinion on project prioritization.

“Willingness to leave comments and feedback is a great gauge for engagement. Respondents were an active, articulate bunch. These responses are an incredible resource for the borough,” Ms. Nash’s analysis report read.

About 35 percent of respondents opted to leave a comment, which is over 300 responses for the borough to read, digest and potentially act on, according to Ms. Nash’s analysis report.

Respondents who were in favor of the project were presented with potential uses of the space to rank in order of interest.

The building use rankings are as follows: a communal activity space, an event/exhibit/performing arts space, a welcome center and historical society, a community garden, short-term childcare, a remote-work flex space, a cafe and an indoor park.

On June 15, the community heard a project presentation from DIGroupArchitecture and T&M Associates, with seven professionals available to answer residents’ questions and concerns.

Based on the group’s eight-week study of the site, it is estimated to cost the borough approximately $10,717,661 for the building to be remediated to code, retrofitted and renovated.

Following that meeting, borough officials began to develop the survey.

“From that point, we shifted to a survey — something that was brought up in the town hall meetings,” said Mayor Fox.

The manager of the survey was Ms. Nash of Communications Design Consulting.

The survey’s resident team was comprised of Robyn Flipse, Lauren Saracene, Refet Kaplan, Christine Dickler, Barb Carlucci and Paula Gavin.

The mayor was not involved in the survey development except to provide requested information including data about four to five separate projects the town is considering pursuing in the near future.

Mayor Fox and Mairin Bellack invited local news representatives from The Coast Star in Manasquan and The Coaster in Asbury Park to what they called an “Editorial Board Meeting” on Monday, Aug. 8.

Ms. Bellack said in an email, “There has been misinformation about the LaReine Ave. Church floating around social media. This meeting is to help facilitate accurate information and to address false rumors through credible publications.”

Officials attending included Mayor Fox, Business Administrator Kimberly Humphrey and Ms. Bellack, the borough’s communications director.

The meeting, however, was not open to the public, although four residents, Thomas J. Coan, Paula Gentempo, Dan Greenberg and Paul Neshamkin, president of the Bradley Beach Historical Society, sought to attend.

The individuals were turned away by Ms. Bellack at the door.

Mr. Neshamkin told The Coast Star that he was informed that the meeting was taking place by a social media post on the Bradley Beach NJ Community Facebook page.

“It was mentioned if there was going to be a press conference at 11 a.m. and basically it was asking if anybody knew about it,” said Mr. Neshamkin. “I responded and said if it was open to the public I was going to go and see if I could ask any questions.”

Mr. Neshamkin said he was surprised that the meeting was closed to the public and that he was prepared to ask questions regarding the survey’s overall validity.

“I thought at least it would be open to the public. I didn’t fully expect to ask any questions but I thought it was a public meeting. When I arrived I noticed on the door that they weren’t calling it a press conference, they were calling it an editorial board meeting, invitation only.”

Mr. Neshamkin said he absolutely plans to vote in the November referendum stating, “We will be definitely communicating with the residents of the borough of Bradley Beach in trying to win their support in the referendum.”

Mayor Fox plans to hold town hall informational meetings that are open to the public regarding the survey results before the referendum vote.

During these meetings, residents will be able to voice any concerns they may have as well as ask questions.

Check out our other Bradley Beach stories, updated daily. And remember to pick up a copy of The Coast Star—on newsstands Thursday or online in our e-Edition.

Subscribe today! If you're not already an annual subscriber to The Coast Star, get your subscription today! For just $34 per year, you will receive local mail delivery weekly, with pages and pages of local news and online access to our e-edition on Starnewsgroup.com.

Why Don't Philadelphians Go to Northern Jersey Beaches?

BY JILLY MacDOWELL | I returned to Philly this spring after living at the beach in Jersey for five years. As I waved goodbye to my Philly homies heading “down the shore” this past month, I wondered, why don't Philadelphians, in general, go to beaches north of Atlantic City?See, I didn't live down the shore. I lived in Monmouth County, arguably known as Central New Jersey — in Bradley Beach, a great little sle...

BY JILLY MacDOWELL | I returned to Philly this spring after living at the beach in Jersey for five years. As I waved goodbye to my Philly homies heading “down the shore” this past month, I wondered, why don't Philadelphians, in general, go to beaches north of Atlantic City?

See, I didn't live down the shore. I lived in Monmouth County, arguably known as Central New Jersey — in Bradley Beach, a great little sleepy non-commercial township between Asbury Park and Belmar. The process of moving to Illadelph, including trapping a cat, involved seven trips back and forth. None of them exceeded 75 minutes.

This is 15 minutes longer than it takes to get to Atlantic City, but at least 20 minutes shorter than the journey to Cape May. Make it make sense! When did we agree to hand the north over to... the northerners? I get it, seems fair, but if you haven't experienced the night-and-day difference between northern and southern NJ beaches, I urge you to consider Monmouth for next summer... up the shore.

Because Monmouth is really very nice. It has much to offer and things that are un-ironically cool. Starting with the closest to Philly (from NJ-295N to 195E which turns into 138E and plops you 10 blocks from the beach in Belmar), here's a quick rundown:

As the most "Jersey Shore" town in Monmouth, Belmar has its charms: Bruce's 10th Avenue and E Street, adorable cottages, every retired roadie on the Eastern seaboard, and the legendary D'Jai's (Oceanside Bar & Cafe) and Bar Ant(-icipation). Backwards ball caps, ankle bracelets, underboob, Hollister — you know the vibes. You can rent a slightly crappy house for $20k for the whole summer (that's a little over $1000/week, which is unbeatable).

Go north to adjacent hamlet Avon-by-the-Sea to find superb landscaping, classy though few Airbnb options, discreet wealth and great vegan food at Seed to Sprout. If a Nancy Meyers film was set in Jersey, it would be set in Avon. That's Avon (pronounced "a" as in "actual," accent on the "von," or like Avalon without the "al").

Next up is my beloved Bradley Beach. This historic town, named for Asbury founder and designer James A. Bradley, is about 40 percent annual residents, so it's ver-r-r-ry laidback. It boasts a spotless beach, decent jetty surfing, a tasteful boardwalk and all amenities, including a movie theater, bowling alley and greater restaurant density than any other shore town! DelPonte's pizzeria, bakery and new gelateria are iconic; Luna Verde's Mexican vegan is astonishingly good.

You've heard of Ocean Grove, right? The Camp Meeting Association that owns the land under all the private residences? The one with all the permanent tents on prime oceanfront real estate? And all the restored Victorians? It's cute, congested and, for my money, a day trip kind of town. Its northern border, on Wesley Lake, faces Asbury. In fact, there are lakes between most of these Monmouth towns. Expect to brake for geese crossings.

The "core" of the northern shore is Asbury Park. You've probably already heard good things! It's the usual mix of a few stalwart venues (long live the Saint!), an inventive restaurant scene, oodles of vintage/tattoo/maker boutiques, and new construction everywhere. It is a long way from the desolate gang playground of the late 20th century.

The walkable downtown area centered around Cookman Avenue will satisfy every diner – Rice Asian for sushi takeout, Taka for dine-in; sister hotspots Barrio Costero and Reyla for Mexican and Middle Eastern, respectively; Pascal & Sabine for chic Parisian. Cookman Creamery does ice cream sorcery. And Seaside Heights fans can find Maruca's spiral-sauced pizza up on Asbury's historic boardwalk!

The boardwalk is also a constantly evolving art exhibit, thanks to the Wooden Walls Project work with muralists and installation artists. Find the Amber Lynn heart! And the Shepherd Fairey punk murals! Then find your inner child at the Silverball Arcade! The "City by the Sea" is a place to have fun; September brings the annual Sea Hear Now music fest, organized by music vet Danny Clinch. Last year, a crowd of more than 25k descended upon Asbury's beach for headliners Smashing Pumpkins and Pearl Jam. This year, it's Stevie Nicks and Green Day.

Unlike the aforementioned small towns, Asbury offers a variety of hotels; consider the Citizen M-ish Asbury, a reimagined Y with a rooftop bar & movie screening deck; Asbury Ocean Club, the inevitable highrise no one wanted but whose infinity pool is just begging for a cannonball; or the recently opened adults-only St. Laurent with its Slim Aaron feels.

North of the AP "core" and spanning about five miles, we have:

Deal, a drivethrough town, is for ooh-ing and ahh-ing at the mostly pre-1980 homes and their private beaches.

Wind up in Long Branch, which is coming back, slowly, and sometimes quickly. New hotels, chic high-rise condos, and a newly commercialized boardwalk with high-end shops and better oceanside food than most. On the other side of Ocean Avenue you can find just about all of Jersey's best Latin foods; Long Branch is more than a third Latinx.

Keep going to picturesque Monmouth Beach and Sea Bright on the Shrewsbury Bay – more coastline, more water sports! Anjelica's is arguably the county's best Italian food. Ubiquitous restaurateur David Burke has a few spots up here too, as well as in Belmar. Oceanside rentals are your best bet in this neck of the sand; units were constructed in recent years behind a post-Sandy seawall that's necessary but frankly a bummer from the street side.

It's just a few short miles to Sandy Hook, a decommissioned army base with an unexpectedly close-up view of New York City. Its beaches are free, except the very popular clothing-optional one, and there's an appealing wildness about the entire area.

From here you can also loop around to the Highlands -- find top-notch hiking and views at Hartshorne Woods Park, Sandy Hook Bay, Mount Mitchill Scenic Overlook, and dense little downtown blocks. Not the shore, but water-adjacent and worth a trip for some exquisite ice cream from Nicholas Creamery.

South of the Asbury core to the Ocean County line you'll find:

The absurdly photogenic Spring Lake, a Cape May analogue, is for a bed & breakfast with the parents. Or a baby-moon. Something wholesome. Grace & Frankie. More quiet money. Stunning beach. Next door, the town of Sea Girt continues the pattern.

Finally, it's Manasquan! The Squan is for surfing and lobster rolls. Its diminutive Main Street is packed with healthy dining options. La Mondina in nearby Brielle is a NJ Housewives favorite. Right over the bridge is Ocean County's Point Pleasant Beach, known famously for Jenkinson's, Kohr's frozen custard, boardwalk gaming and the "traditional" boardwalk experience a Philadelphian might crave.

You can walk along the ocean, mostly on boardwalk, the entire distance from Manasquan to Asbury, about nine miles. You won't find any ferris wheels but you might find your new favorite beach.

Plus: blown-glass creations, a chic hotel on the Jersey Shore and more recommendations from T Magazine.

Welcome to the T List, a newsletter from the editors of T Magazine. Each week, we share things we’re eating, wearing, listening to or coveting now. Sign up here to find us in your inbox every Wednesday. And you can always reach us at [email protected] by Step...

Welcome to the T List, a newsletter from the editors of T Magazine. Each week, we share things we’re eating, wearing, listening to or coveting now. Sign up here to find us in your inbox every Wednesday. And you can always reach us at [email protected].

Step by Step

The Jewelry Designer Matthew ‘Mateo’ Harris’s Beauty Routine

I start my mornings by splashing freezing cold water on my face and then washing it with Obagi Nu-Derm Gentle Cleanser. I’ve been using this brand for years — a friend of mine who works at a spa introduced me to it — and swear by it. I also use the brand’s Professional-C serum, which has truly restored my skin. It’s magic. I use sunscreen by V.Sun in SPF 50. Sunscreen is something my mother, who lives in Jamaica, taught me to always wear, even in the winter. I used to wonder why because I’m so Black, but she is 70 and looks amazing. After I go outside during the day, I wash my face again, this time with Cetaphil Gentle Skin Cleanser, since I don’t want to use up my expensive face wash. After the Cetaphil, I follow with Skinceuticals Hydrating B5 and Obaji’s facial moisturizer. Sometimes, I also throw in Paula’s Choice’s azelaic acid booster, which brightens my skin and shrinks my pores. At night, I use Skinceuticals discoloration serum. I have pigmentation problems, so I live by this product. As for my lips, I have bought a million and one lip balms, but just give me that original Chapstick in cherry. I travel often, so for the plane I always bring an SK-II Facial Treatment Mask. On my body, I also use a geranium oil by Aesop, which smells divine. I wish I’d known about Face Gym earlier. I’ve been trying to do more facial exercises at home, especially mewing (using tongue movements to reshape your jawline). I watch these YouTube videos of guys who have been mewing since high school, and their faces are so chiseled and their jawlines so strong. Another recent discovery for me is Matiere Premiere, which has a sexy, mysterious fragrance called Falcon Leather. Every time I wear it, people stop me on the street to ask me about it.

George DiStefano spent his childhood summers at his grandparents’ beach house on the Jersey Shore. Now 29, he’s looking to facilitate equally idyllic days for guests of the James, a 17-unit hotel he’s opened in Bradley Beach, N.J., just a block from the water. A construction manager by day, DiStefano first toured the Victorian-era building in May 2021 and immediately fell in love with it. By the fall, he’d teamed up with the 31-year-old interior designer Sebastian Zuchowicki to help create a warm and textured space. Vintage silver-plated pitchers and creamer jugs are used for the daily breakfast service (strawberry muffins, raspberry crumb cake, and — a local delicacy — decadent pork rolls) in the dining room, one lime-washed wall of which is hung with an oversize abstract painting by the contemporary British artist Joe Henry Baker. Each guest room is unique, though a number of them feature custom Turkish rugs and work by the Australian artist Pamela Tang, whom DiStefano and Zuchowicki discovered on Instagram. The hotel’s linens were sewn closer to home — by seamstresses in nearby Asbury Park. When the pair couldn’t find certain pieces they had in mind, DiStefano simply made use of the on-site wood shop and produced, among other things, a series of minimal bedside lamp stands. And he paved parts of the grounds with gravel because, he says, the sound of it crunching underfoot reminds him of summers gone by. Rooms from $300, thejamesbradleybeach.com.

Buy This

Playful Glassware From Turkey

The glass studio Suna K lets a hypothetical be its guide: What if Ettore Sottsass, the 20th-century Italian architect, industrial designer and founder of the Memphis Group, had visited Anatolia? The result is a series of modern, playful and one-of-a-kind glass sculptures, handblown by Asl? Altay, Can Altay and Mert Üngör. Anatolia, now part of modern Turkey, was a cradle of glasswork, and the studio’s designs are influenced by the wealth of artifacts from the many civilizations that have made the region home. Üngör began working with glass in 2012 at Sabanc? University in Tuzla and continued as a masters student in visual arts at Texas A&M University in 2014. He opened his own hot studio after he returned to Turkey. The Altays, who are married, joined Üngör for a residency in 2019 and have been working with him ever since. Now all based out of Istanbul, the trio make pieces that consist of a series of bulbous forms stacked on top of one another like plates or cups stored haphazardly in a cupboard, and that are both totemic and creature-like — some even have feet. This is fitting, since the word “suna” is Turkish for altar and also refers to a species of the duck family. It can also be a woman’s name. “We imagine her as someone with strong ties to myriad histories and geographies,” explain Can and Asl?. sunak.glass

In the late ’80s, a model asked Dick Bradsell, then a bartender at Fred’s Club in London, for a drink that would wake her up and then mess her up. He’d never heard of such a thing but improvised, shaking vodka, syrup, Kahlúa and fresh espresso, and using what he called three lucky coffee beans as a garnish. Thus, the espresso martini was born. Over 30 years later, the drink seems to be making a comeback. A dirty chai-flavored version appears on Indochine’s just-launched brunch menu, and is already proving to be a popular order. “It is the drink for the fashion and art crowd,” says CT Hedden, the downtown Manhattan restaurant’s manager. No wonder the curator, author and associate director of Pace Gallery Kimberly Drew found herself craving one at an event celebrating the recipients of the Dior Photography and Visual Arts Award for Young Talents that was held in Arles, France, in July. “It’s perfect for when you’re enchanted by the conversation but exhausted from your jet lag,” she says. (Or for when even much shorter journeys outside the home are depleting.) In New York, she likes to order the drink off menu from Frenchette in TriBeCa. A bit north, in the West Village, Don Angie recently debuted its take, which is called the Italian Coffee Situation and contains biscotti-infused vodka and star anise. Unsurprisingly, the espresso martini is a longstanding staple at Sant Ambroeus, which takes its coffee shops as seriously as its restaurants. Starting at the end of this month, you’ll also find espresso martinis at the U.S. Open, where the Grey Goose suite will serve them with a pinch of salt, and with a few beans for good measure.

Nestled on the jungle side of Punta Pájaros, a sleepy road that runs parallel to Oaxaca, Mexico’s, Pacific coastline, Kakurega Omakase is the first restaurant of its kind in the area, which lies a nearly 30-minute car ride northwest of Puerto Escondido. It was opened by the Mexico City-based hotel developer Grupo Habita as a means for travelers to taste the bounty of local seafood, and as part of a secluded world the brand has constructed in the area. The restaurant is just a short walk from the brand’s Hotel Escondido, a bohemian beachside retreat, and set beneath an open-air, thatched-roof palapa built in the same style as the hotel’s bungalow suites. Designed by the architect Alberto Kalach and his firm, TAX Architects, and the artist Bosco Sodi (who runs the nearby nonprofit arts center Casa Wabi), the structure was made from brick, concrete and pinewood charred according to the Japanese weatherproofing technique known as shou sugi ban. Guests first enter the restaurant by way of a sandy path that snakes through a garden of fragrant copal, guayacán and areca trees. Each night, the chef Keisuke Harada and his team offer three sittings, each for only 12 guests. The accompanying 10 courses change daily and are always seasonal — dishes range from rib-eye tataki to sailfish carpaccio — but are always best enjoyed with Japanese whiskey, beer or sake. Reservations: [email protected]

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A Trio of Artists Who Took ’80s New York by Storm

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