BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Atlantic Highlands

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Atlantic Highlands, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
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 Basement Leak Repair Atlantic Highlands, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Atlantic Highlands, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Atlantic Highlands

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Atlantic Highlands:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Atlantic Highlands, NJ

Latest News in Atlantic Highlands, NJ

Five-story apartment building proposed in Red Bank not a big hit with neighbors

RED BANK - A proposed 50-unit apartment building on the east side of town has zoning board members and residents worried about changes to the skyline, design and parking.The proposed building presented to the board Thursday night would replace the one-story office building and adjoining parking lot at the intersection of Globe Court and Mechanic Street.The first floor is proposed to hold 75 parking spaces for residents and the four floors above are proposed to contain 12 one-bedroom apartments and 38 two-bedroom ...

RED BANK - A proposed 50-unit apartment building on the east side of town has zoning board members and residents worried about changes to the skyline, design and parking.

The proposed building presented to the board Thursday night would replace the one-story office building and adjoining parking lot at the intersection of Globe Court and Mechanic Street.

The first floor is proposed to hold 75 parking spaces for residents and the four floors above are proposed to contain 12 one-bedroom apartments and 38 two-bedroom apartments. Eight of the apartments will be affordable apartment units. It is proposed to contain a gym, a common storage area, a multipurpose room, patios and a roof deck. The ground floor garage is proposed to only be assessable by remotes given to residents.

The developer, One Globe Court LLC, is associated with the company Kalian Management LLC, according to Monmouth County property records. Kalian Management LLC has developed apartment buildings up and down the Jersey Shore from Atlantic Highlands to Surf City. It recently completed the 24-unit apartment building called The Forum across Mechanic Street from the proposed site.

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While the area is zoned for four-story buildings, the proposed building would be five stories in total.

Richard Garber, architect for the developer said, he designed the building so that a 6-foot-1-inch person standing on the sidewalk under the proposed building would not be able to see the fifth floor, which is designed to be set back from the other four stories.

However, board member Sean Murphy questioned the need for five stories. He said the project was asking the board for both a height and a parking variance, which led him to ask if five floors was appropriate if the developer was also low on parking stalls.

Tom Cabella, who rents out the neighboring houses along Mechanic Street, also questioned the five floors.

“My residents, my tenants, they live on the third floor.” Cabella said. “Right now, they’re looking across the one-story building. They have a nice view. You are proposing, five stories, which will restrict their view.”

Garber said, “(Development is) something that brings a certain amount of change. … There’s going to be a building built here one way or another following the guidelines set forth by the municipality. We’re going to change the streetscape a little bit.”

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Garber said the building is proposed to be designed with brick and cementitious fiber paneling, “which is a more contemporary, smooth material for quite a clean look.”

Resident Cindy Burnham asked whether the project blended in with the historic neighborhood it is proposed to be located near.

Garber said standards set by the federal government regarding new construction adjacent to historic property should be “sympathetic in scale.”

He continued, “I actually feel like it is a very sympathetic and very appropriate new addition.”

Although 88 parking spaces are required under town rules for the proposed building, engineer Jason Fichter said 75 are proposed. This would give the apartment building a ratio of 1.5 cars per apartment.

John McCormack, the developer’s traffic engineer, said his studies of neighboring apartment buildings have shown that a ratio of 1.1 vehicles per unit or 1.3 vehicles per unit was sufficient. He said the proposed 1.5 vehicles per apartment unit was more than sufficient. He also said having 35 parking spaces designated for compact cars will not become an issue.

Karen Cabella, wife of Tom Cabella, disagreed, saying in their history as landlords, apartments in the area usually attract young couples or roommates who are unlikely to only have a single car.

“In my experience over 35 years, I have never had a two-bedroom apartment with one car,” Cabella said.

She also said SUVs are more common and having half of the spaces designated for only compact cars will become a problem later on.

McCormack said that was a business decision and prospective residents with large cars might not find the proposed apartments suitable for their needs.

The next meeting for the proposed apartment building will be 6:30 p.m. Thursday, Oct. 20 in the Red Bank Borough Hall.

Olivia Liu is a reporter covering transportation, Red Bank and western Monmouth County. She can be reached at [email protected]

Seastreak gets NJ judge OK to boot NY Waterway off Belford ferry route

FREEHOLD - Monmouth County properly awarded a contract for ferry service between Belford and Manhattan to Seastreak, a state Superior Court judge has ruled, clearing the way for a new operator to take over the route.Judge David F. Bauman denied the request by NY Waterway to order the county to rebid the co...

FREEHOLD - Monmouth County properly awarded a contract for ferry service between Belford and Manhattan to Seastreak, a state Superior Court judge has ruled, clearing the way for a new operator to take over the route.

Judge David F. Bauman denied the request by NY Waterway to order the county to rebid the contract. He wrote instead that the ferry company didn't meet the requirement from the bid proposal that it have a Consent of Surety to prove it could continue to operate in case of financial trouble.

NY Waterway's "failure to timely submit a Consent of Surety as part of its bid proposal is deemed by operation of law a 'fatal defect,'" Bauman wrote.

The ruling is a blow to NY Waterway, a Weehawken-based company that had shuttled commuters from the Belford Ferry Terminal in Middletown to Jersey City, lower Manhattan and the West Side of Manhattan since the route began 20 years ago.

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Instead, Seastreak, its competitor that long has operated among Highlands, Atlantic Highlands, lower Manhattan and the East Side of Manhattan, is expected take over after NY Waterway's contract expires Oct. 27. Seastreak has proposed 11 daily trips during weekdays with a ticket price of $28 one way.

NY Waterway officials didn't immediately respond to a request for comment.

NY Waterway filed a lawsuit in July after losing the contract over what it said was a technicality, despite claiming its proposal of 16 daily trips during weekdays with a ticket price of $21.50 each way was more favorable to passengers.

At issue: The ferry company said it didn't have a Consent of Surety, acknowledgement that it had a bond to ensure the service would continue in case it ran into trouble, as the bid proposal seemed to require. Rather, NY Waterway said it had a line of credit from a bank that could serve as a backstop.

It also believed the county's request for proposal indicated that the line of credit, which it previously used, would be sufficient.

Bauman didn't agree, noting the requirement for Consent of Surety was written in the bid proposal in all capital letters.

"The thrust of (NY Waterway's) inquiry was not whether it could submit a (letter of credit) in lieu of Consent of Surety, but why it needed to post security at all, in any amount and by any form given its 'substantial track record and operating history,'" Bauman wrote.

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Monmouth County Commissioner Director Thomas A. Arnone said after the decision that the county had spent a considerable amount of time putting together the bid proposal for the ferry route and noted the court found the process appropriate.

“As always, the county remains committed to making sure the traveling public has safe, reliable and affordable options for ferry travel to New York City,” Arnone said in a statement.

Still unclear is what will happen to NY Waterway's service between Belford and Jersey City. That route was not a requirement in the bid process, but Seastreak officials said in July that they would like to continue it.

"We will be working hard over the coming months to make sure that the transition is a pleasant experience for our customers," James D. Baker, a company spokesman, said in July.

Michael L. Diamond is a business reporter who has been writing about the New Jersey economy and health care industry for more than 20 years. He can be reached at [email protected]

23 Years of Community Love

Letter to the editorDearest Allan,We know how difficult this decision has been for you to put the Atlantic Highlands Herald on an extended hiatus, but, we have no doubts you will continue to be a great neighbor and respected community leader, providing information and provoking thoughts among our neighbors.As hard as this is for you, we hope you will remember all that you have accomplished with this venture. You always stayed true to your promise to provide family, friends, and neighbors with accurate information regardi...

Letter to the editor

Dearest Allan,

We know how difficult this decision has been for you to put the Atlantic Highlands Herald on an extended hiatus, but, we have no doubts you will continue to be a great neighbor and respected community leader, providing information and provoking thoughts among our neighbors.

As hard as this is for you, we hope you will remember all that you have accomplished with this venture. You always stayed true to your promise to provide family, friends, and neighbors with accurate information regarding their local news and county emergencies. You provided helpful and necessary information during 9-11, Super Storm Sandy and Covid, to mention only a few. You have been of service to your readers while also giving a place for your dedicated columnists to share their views. We can’t begin to count how many non-profit organizations you have helped along the way, publishing any press release that was sent to you.

We know first-hand how hard you worked to learn about new ways and tools to bring your product into the electronic age, after all, The AH Herald is the 1st official online news publication, setting the pace for others to follow. Something you should be truly proud of.

When you first published The Herald, you made the entire Bayshore more visible by filling the void of local news at the time. You have spent time covering elections from Local School Board to State House and Gubernatorial; covering so many feel-good news stories while always delivering the sad news with a sense of duty and reverence.

For readers abreast and abroad, you became a lifeline of important information that kept them up-to-date about their beloved hometowns. The forum that you hosted pre-dates the “Town Pages” on Facebook by a decade or more. You have always been a forward thinking person who has been ahead of the curve on many things we take for granted in the modern world.

We are extremely proud of you and your vision. So much so, that we are very excited for whatever you do next.

“Proud of the friends I keep, Proud of the ends I seek”

Remember, when one door closes another always opens…. You just have to look for the door!

Love,Jacque and Cranston Dean (Your biggest fans)

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The Umpire Wore a Top Hat: Vintage baseball on Sandy Hook Bay

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – On Saturday, July 30, some 100 people walked through the gates of Firemen’s Field and were transported back to a more genteel time.The Atlantic Highlands Historical Society, under the leadership of Alice Kupper, held its fifth annual Vintage Baseball game with the home team, the Monmouth Furnace, battling the Elizabeth Resolutes. Prior to the main event there were games for children and adults, like the Great Water Balloon battle which turned into a free-for-all of laughter and hijinks as adults and ch...

ATLANTIC HIGHLANDS – On Saturday, July 30, some 100 people walked through the gates of Firemen’s Field and were transported back to a more genteel time.

The Atlantic Highlands Historical Society, under the leadership of Alice Kupper, held its fifth annual Vintage Baseball game with the home team, the Monmouth Furnace, battling the Elizabeth Resolutes. Prior to the main event there were games for children and adults, like the Great Water Balloon battle which turned into a free-for-all of laughter and hijinks as adults and children gleefully watered one another down. There was the water bucket relay, called Sponge Bob, where participants carried soaked sponges from a full pail of water to an empty one. The team that filled its bucket first won the game. Corn hole, Jenga and more kept everyone entertained.

All the while, an organ pumped out top songs from the late 19th century, setting the ambiance for the big game.

At 11:30 a.m. a coin toss determined the Elizabeth Resolutes would be first at bat. Both teams are members of the Mid-Atlantic Vintage Baseball league. The league boasts 22 teams across multiple states, with a regular schedule of games just like modern major league baseball. However, the game is played by rules and regulations adopted by the National Association of Base-Ball Players in New York Dec. 9, 1863 (1864 rules). The team uniforms all conform to baseball of 1864, as do the language and baseball terms. For example, a turn at bat is referred to as a “hand.” An out is called a “hand out.” The players have colorful nicknames like Soup, The Professor, Dapper Dan and Doc.

As Monmouth Furnace stood its ground the crowd went wild for every hit and every play the home team made against its rivals. Parents used the game to teach their children about the sport while hot dogs and sodas seemed to be in everyone’s hands. Laughter and cheers, along with organ music, filled the air.

The game ended with the Resolutes putting out the Furnace 16-4. As the players went back to their dugouts, the crowd lingered, laughing and joking, strangers becoming fast friends and talking about the next events to be hosted by the Atlantic Highlands Historical Society.

The society has a full schedule of events that can be found on its website at ahhistory.org. For more information about the Mid-Atlantic Vintage Baseball League, visit mavbbl.com.

To attend a Monmouth Furnace game, view the schedule at monmouthfurnacebaseball.org.

This article originally appeared in the Aug. 4 – 10, 2022 print edition of The Two River Times.

Tripletail fish caught off a New Jersey lobster pot

A rare catch for this area, a popular Gulf fish called a tripletail was landed last week on a private boat that was out pot hopping the lobster flags roughly 20 miles off of Atlantic Highlands.A delicious fish that is only regulated by the five Gulf states, Texas through Florida, and two Atlantic states Georgia and South Carolina that have fisheries, the tripletail is a rare, but not completely uncommon, visitor to waters this far north. Juvenile tripletail are known to swim on their sides in patches of Sargasso weeds a...

A rare catch for this area, a popular Gulf fish called a tripletail was landed last week on a private boat that was out pot hopping the lobster flags roughly 20 miles off of Atlantic Highlands.

A delicious fish that is only regulated by the five Gulf states, Texas through Florida, and two Atlantic states Georgia and South Carolina that have fisheries, the tripletail is a rare, but not completely uncommon, visitor to waters this far north. Juvenile tripletail are known to swim on their sides in patches of Sargasso weeds and aren't too shy when it comes to approaching boats.

The fish was brought into the Tackle Box in Hazlet where Phil Sciortino Jr. put it on a scale and marked its' weight at 3 1/2 pounds.

He said Steve Coponi, who's also from Hazlet, his dad and sister were out on their boat Liv-Ven 4 Reel looking for mahi-mahi around the pots. Coponi spotted the tripletail and got it to bite on a Tsunami swim shad. The fish wrapped around the pot line and took some nifty maneuvering to untangle before the rare catch could be landed.

After making a big splash inshore last week, the bonito and false albacore were a little harder to find over the weekend. Capt. Dave Riback on the Queen Mary party boat didn't have much luck Saturday locating the fish, but not for lack effort though, as he said he combed over several areas where he had them only the day before.

Sunday was an improvement, despite some choppy seas and a steady southeast wind. The bluefish were biting and early and he said many of his fares had limits before the morning was over. They also reeled in some bonito and mackerel.

Mid-Atlantic tournament pays out $5.3 million

The five-day, high stakes, Mid-Atlantic tournament, held in Cape May, had plenty of drama on the tournament's final day. NBA legend Michael Jordan's Jupiter, Florida based sport boat Catch 23 was holding onto first place in white marlin category with a 73 pounder caught on the contest's third day. The fish was beatable as a ton of white marlin were caught in the tournament in the first four days. In fact 320 were caught and released for the tournament, however, finding one to meet the 69-inch, 65-pound minimum was proving to be difficult, according to the tournament's spokesperson. Only 14 white marlin met the size limit.

One of those just made it back on time. As the sun was beginning to set on the final weigh in day on Saturday, Capt. Steve Castellini backed the Millstone-based sport boat Kaarmaa to the scale at Canyon Club Resort Marina in Cape May with what turned out to be a the winning 75-pound white marlin on board. The fish was landed by Anthony Alves. While the Kaarma took home the first-place money worth $871,402, Jordan's second place marlin was still good enough for $658,045 in prize money.

The tournament also had payouts in several other categories including blue marlin, dolphin, tuna and wahoo. Five winners took home checks of $576,000 or more. In total the tournament paid out $5.3 million.

When Jersey Shore native Dan Radel is not reporting the news, you can find him in a college classroom where he is a history professor. Reach him @danielradelapp; 732-643-4072; [email protected]

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