BASEMENT WATERPROOFING IN Allenhurst

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Basement Waterproofing

The Healthy Way

Unlike other waterproofers in New Jersey, we provide our customers with a streamlined process for all of their waterproofing needs. Our goal is to get to the crux of your home's issues. If we spot signs of water in your basement, we go right to the source of the problem, working hard to fix structural deficiencies to prevent problems like mold growth and foundation damage. We are proud to be New Jersey's one-stop shop for all of your basement waterproofing needs. New Jersey homeowners choose Healthy Way because our experts are friendly, experienced, harworking, and fully certified. We won't rest until your waterproofing problems are solved. Because we specialize in both interior and exterior waterproofing services, you won't have to worry about hiring a laundry list of contractors to correct your moisture problems. Healthy Way provides all-inclusive basement waterproofing in Allenhurst, it's no surprise that New Jersey residents trust Healthy Way to make their homes more livable every day.

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The Healthy Way Difference

At Healthy Way, we strive to set ourselves apart from the competition by offering the best basement waterproofing services in New Jersey. We won't be happy with our work until you are 100% satisfied, whether you need a thorough moisture inspection or a large-scale waterproofing project. Our basement waterproofing experts are certified, trained, and have worked on more than 4,000 repairs. They understand that your moisture problems aren't like anybody else's, which is why all of our waterproofing proposals are created specifically for your home. You won't find any "one-size-fits-all" solutions here, and we wouldn't have it any other way.

  • Best warranties in the industry
  • Free initial inspection
  • Full-service basement waterproofing
  • Mold remediation
  • Foundation repair
  • Water management solutions tailored to your unique situation

Once your basement waterproofing project is complete, we make it a point to keep our staff available to address any questions or concerns you may have. Our goal is your 100% satisfaction, from the moment you call our office to schedule an inspection to the time you sign off on our work.

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Waterproofing Services in New Jersey

With more than two decades of experience and a team of fully certified and trained waterproofing professionals, there is no waterproofing project in New Jersey that we can't handle. When not addressed, water and moisture problems can cause serious health risks for your family. We're talking buckling walls, sinking foundations, and even toxic mold. With your home's value and your family's health on the line, you must attack these problems head-on, and the best way to do that is by bringing in the Healthy Way team. Some signs of existing water problems in your home can include:

  • Signs of rust or oxidation on metal fixtures
  • Mildew residue
  • Water stains on your foundation's walls and floors
  • Erosion of your concrete
  • Mineral deposits found on pipes
  • Flooded landscaping after heavy rain or snow
  • Pooling water around your foundation's interior
  • Humidity levels above 60% in your basement or crawlspace
 Basement Wall Repair Allenhurst, NJ
 Mold Remediation Companies Allenhurst, NJ
 Basement Leak Repair Allenhurst, NJ
 Waterproof Basement Allenhurst, NJ

Basement Waterproofing in Allenhurst

Healthy Way has been providing the most trusted, effective basement waterproofing in New Jersey since 2007. Waterproofing your basement is crucial to protecting the value of your home and the safety of your family. That is why we only employ the best, brightest, fully-certified experts, who will treat your home like it was their very own. Taking shortcuts just isn't in our nature. We use innovative technology and time-tested techniques to discover and solve your basement's water-related problems.

Because basement wall leaks and water seepage are often caused by structural issues, external waterproofing is required. While some companies only seal the interior walls of your basement, Healthy Way goes the extra mile to fix your water issues inside and out. That way, your basement leaks stop for good.

Once we find the root of the water issues in your basement, we will get to work on a custom-designed solution that will exceed your basement waterproofing needs.

Our basement waterproofing services in New Jersey help prevent the following problems:

  • Mold growth, which can cause serious health hazards for your family
  • Basement flooding
  • Loss of valuables
  • Serious water damage to your home's walls and floors
  • Decrease in home value

Don't wait to address the moisture developing in your basement - call Healthy Way today for a customized solution to your water seepage problems.

What Causes Moisture in Your Basement?

It's easy to spot water leaking through a crack in your basement, but most homeowners don't know that there is a potential for water issues without heavy rains or obvious signs of standing water. At Healthy Way, we try to educate our clients on the real causes of water in your basement. Here are two of the most common reasons why you might need basement waterproofing in Allenhurst:

Clay Bowl Effect

The "Clay Bowl" Effect

It might not be evident on the surface, but many basements are built in a below-grade dip, which is surrounded by backfill. Because backfill is made up of soil that was removed during foundation digging, it creates an empty shape or "bowl" effect. Once the foundation is finished, this loose soil is placed back around the foundation. Unfortunately, soil of this consistency is more absorbent and porous than the undisturbed soil around it, which is hard-packed and less porous. When rain or thunderstorms occurs, the soil closest to your home becomes saturated, putting pressure on your basement walls.

Hydrostatic Pressure

Hydrostatic Pressure:

This kind of pressure affects homeowners with property built below the water table or on a hillside where water runs down a hill. When the soil around your foundation becomes saturated, it will expand and put intense pressure on the walls of your foundation and basement. This pressure can create cracks, giving water an easy route into your basement.

How Healthy Way Solves Your Basement Waterproofing Needs

Having a wet basement not only puts your health at risk, it lowers the value of your home and makes it more difficult to sell. The good news? We offer a number of waterproofing services and products to solve your problems fast. A few of our solutions include:

  • Sump pumps
  • Perimeter drainage systems
  • Doorway drainage systems
  • High-strength washer hoses
  • Floor and wall crack repair
  • Replacement windows
  • Flood protection for your water heater

When you use Healthy Way for basement waterproofing in New Jersey, you can rest easy knowing that all our systems come with a written, lifetime warranty. This warranty is transferrable, meaning you can re-establish your home's value and give future owners confidence knowing that their new home is protected.

The Healthy Way Basement Waterproofing Process

Because every home is different, your basement waterproofing solution could be vastly different than that of your next-door neighbor. Many factors play a part when it comes to keeping your basement dry and safe for living. As a general rule, we approach each issue with a "prevention over repair" mindset. By taking this stance, we give our clients a more cost-effective, long-term resolution. We're not in the business of putting a "Band-Aid" on your water problem - we want to fix your issue completely, so you don't have to worry about recurring problems. Our effective basement waterproofing systems include a mix of the following strategies:

Interior Waterproofing

Interior Waterproofing

Interior waterproofing methods usually start with our team ensuring that any holes or cracks in your basement floors, walls, and windows are sealed properly. Sealing cracks in your basement is an important first step since this is usually the first place where water can enter your home. Our sealants keep your basement dry and help prevent more moisture from finding its way into your home. Interior waterproofing strategies like these also help lower humidity levels in your basement. While sealants and other interior waterproofing strategies help correct initial issues, they don't usually solve the underlying problem causing leaks in your basement. Those issues are most often found outside your home.

Exterior Waterproofing

Exterior Waterproofing

Once our team is finished with your interior waterproofing, we will move to the exterior of your home. Waterproofing the outside of your home is often a more complex, nuanced goal. Because of the difficult nature of exterior waterproofing, we recommend you consult with our team of professionals before tackling the job on your own. Generally speaking, our team beings the outdoor waterproofing process by excavating the soil around your home's foundation. Once we remove the soil surrounding your foundation, our experts will apply a polymer-based sealant to any cracks we discover. This sealant is a long-term solution and should remain intact for the life of your home. While the Healthy Way team solves your outdoor moisture problems, we will also check your downspouts, to make sure they aren't clogged. An inefficient gutter system does a poor job of directing water away from your home's foundation, which can cause more moisture to seep into your basement over time.

Exterior Waterproofing

Drainage Systems

One of the most common reasons that people need basement waterproofing in cityname is because they have a poor drainage system. A proper drainage system is paramount in keeping your basement dry and your family safe. These systems are meant to direct water away from your home and come in many forms, from French Drains to simple systems like ground soil. If you're thinking of installing a complex drainage system, save yourself some time and check the soil around your foundation first to make sure it isn't retaining moisture. If a more complex system like a sump pump is required, it's best to work with certified professionals like those at Healthy Way, to make sure your drainage system is installed correctly.

WHICH WATERPROOFING SOLUTION IS RIGHT FOR ME?

Because every home is different, it's hard to say what kind of waterproofing solution is right for your situation. Most homeowners require a combination of interior and exterior waterproofing. There are dozens of factors that come into play when it comes to waterproofing your home, so the answer to your problem may be different than your neighbor's. The good news is that Healthy Way is fully equipped to handle whatever moisture issue you're having. We will work tirelessly to make certain your basement is dry, mold-free, and safe to enjoy. That way, you can get back to living life rather than worrying about mold growth or foundation damage.

Contact Us

GET IT DONE RIGHT, THE FIRST TIME

Other companies may offer temporary or partial solutions. At Healthy Way, we believe in correcting the problem completely, so you save money and have long-term peace of mind. Our goal is to fix your problem to prevent it from coming back, or we won't do the work!

If you require quality basement waterproofing, it all starts with a FREE inspection from our certified waterproofing experts. We will take as much time as you need to find your problem, develop a solution, and walk you through our process step-by-step.

Don't let water leaks and foundation damage create a dangerous environment in your home; contact the experts at Healthy Way today!

 Basement Waterproofing Allenhurst, NJ

Latest News in Allenhurst, NJ

Inside a grand house of worship for Armenian diaspora at the Shore | Faith Matters

Ocean Avenue from the West End of Long Branch through Elberon and into Deal to Allenhurst can be considered the mansion mile. There are large, magnificent, often modern, homes. But none is as exquisite as St. Stepanos Armenian Church, which has housed a diaspora of Orthodox Armenians for 35 years.A famous New Jersey Armenian developer, Kevork Hovnanian, built it, covered the costs and established a property endowment fund in memory of his mother, Yester. A bas relief of her graces the narthex of the building along with a bust of Kevor...

Ocean Avenue from the West End of Long Branch through Elberon and into Deal to Allenhurst can be considered the mansion mile. There are large, magnificent, often modern, homes. But none is as exquisite as St. Stepanos Armenian Church, which has housed a diaspora of Orthodox Armenians for 35 years.

A famous New Jersey Armenian developer, Kevork Hovnanian, built it, covered the costs and established a property endowment fund in memory of his mother, Yester. A bas relief of her graces the narthex of the building along with a bust of Kevork. And he deserves it. The structure is self-contained with not only the beautiful church but offices, meeting rooms, a Sunday school, a large dining room and a commercial kitchen.

Its architecture is worth noting and is detailed on the church’s website. The architect, Ramon H. Hovsepian of Worcester, Massachusetts, used a brown, manmade stone that resembles tufa, a volcanic rock indigenous to Armenia. The trim on the exterior is copper with a slate roof. The pyramid-shaped dome rests on a 12-sided, drum-shaped structure of the nave symbolizing the 12 apostles. Made of gold anodized aluminum, it reaches 65 feet into the air.

There is a dark hue over the narthex and halls, which contrasts with the colorful nave and sanctuary dotted with icons and the rest of the spaces where people gather to learn, socialize and do good works.

What happens inside is what makes the pastor, the Rev. Daniel Karadjian, 64, glow.

“Our traditions are based upon vibrant worship services,” he said, “outreach ministries that have uplifted those who have found themselves among the least, the last and the lost.”

The church has six permanent deacons assisting the pastor. The Sunday divine liturgy runs 90 minutes to two hours in Armenian with Scripture readings also read in English.

Pre-COVID, about 55 people attended services on a regular basis, excluding the special feasts. Now about 30 do so, but the church continues to livestream the service and senior citizens tune in, adding some 50 more people. Religion classes run the same time as the service and the church offers Armenian language classes for children.

Karadjian has noticed that more young families with three and even four children are attending.

In all, 350 families are registered at the church with worshipers traveling from as far as Toms River and Bridgewater. The Long Branch church is the only Armenian church in the Shore area with others in Livingston, Fair Lawn and Tenafly. Hudson County’s Holy Cross is in Union City.

Deacon Chris Kesici, 43, of St. Stepanos said that most Armenians “live in diaspora” outside of Armenia after the Turkish genocide during World War I. Some 3 million remain in Armenia while most moved to the Middle East, Syria, Egypt and South America, among other places. He noted that many came to the United States for a better chance at jobs and some travel more than an hour to go to St. Stepanos.

In the pastor, they find a personable family man – he’s married with two sons – who bridges the spiritual with the social. Before entering the seminary in Jerusalem in 1991 at the age of 33, he was a drummer in a jazz band in Bulgaria, where he grew up. His church now hosts picnics, parties and socials, but he is most proud of their bake sales of Armenian delicacies at the holidays. Choreg is an Armenian bread and shekerbura and gata are Armenian versions of baklava.

Karadjian spent years as a priest in the Holy Land in historic churches such as the Holy Sepulchre and found it fascinating. Once he came to the States, he served in North Carolina and the Binghamton and Syracuse areas in upstate New York before coming to Long Branch in 2013 as St. Stepanos’ eighth pastor.

The first church on the spot was a converted mansion called St. Mary, built in 1957 and razed for the new one.

St. Stepanos is named for St. Stephen, the first declared Christian martyr and also the first deacon. They mark his feast day, Dec. 25, while their Christmas is celebrated on Jan. 6, also the feast of the Epiphany. A beautiful stained-glass window of St. Stephen is located above the sanctuary doors of the church reminding the parishioners that their painful past as Armenians has given them new life all around the world.

The Rev. Alexander Santora is the pastor of Our Lady of Grace and St. Joseph, 400 Willow Ave., Hoboken, NJ 07030. Email: [email protected]; Twitter: @padrehoboken.

Details ...

St. Stepanos Armenian Church is located at 1184 Ocean Ave. in Elberon. For information, call 732-229-3661, email [email protected] or go to the parish website, ststepanos.org.

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Exciting news for winery enthusiasts in South Jersey

There has been a buzz for the last year that a new winery is about to open in Voorhees on the site of the former Stafford Farm.For years, people in the area can remember seeing horses train and run the oval track that was visible to traffic on White Horse and Evesham Roads. This will be the home of Saddlehill Cellars.It will be a combination vineyard winery and flower garden, with a tasting room and food to pair with their wines.The...

There has been a buzz for the last year that a new winery is about to open in Voorhees on the site of the former Stafford Farm.

For years, people in the area can remember seeing horses train and run the oval track that was visible to traffic on White Horse and Evesham Roads. This will be the home of Saddlehill Cellars.

It will be a combination vineyard winery and flower garden, with a tasting room and food to pair with their wines.

The property has a long history of agriculture, dating back to 1792 when George Washington granted this property to his personal guard, Lt. John Stafford.

The family maintained the farm for over 225 years and in 2003 received $20 million from the land trust of New Jersey to preserve the property as farmland forever.

The family had always farmed the land or used it for raising and training horses.

In 2005, the Stafford Family sold the property and the new owner used only a very small portion for farming.

The property was then sold in 2021 to Amy and Bill Green, who both grew up in the area and have fond memories of the property.

They have assembled a great team of agricultural professionals and experts to create what they hope will be one of the most impressive wineries in the state.

There are some impressive wineries in South Jersey already, so it's a big task.

There is currently nothing in the near vicinity to offer any direct competition. They plan to harvest some of their crop in the fall of 2023 with bottling and tasting to follow. I'll be there!

Exciting news for winery enthusiasts in South Jersey

Gallery Credit: Dennis Malloy

The initial entrance gate is standing, but no public admittance until they are ready for opening.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

You can now listen to Dennis & Judi — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite best friends anytime, anywhere and any day of the week. Download the Dennis & Judi show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

New Jersey's smallest towns by population

New Jersey's least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.

Gallery Credit: Michael Symons

#20: Rocky Hill

Population 743 … The population of the Somerset County borough grew by 61 people, 9%, between the 2010 and 2020 censuses, pushing it out of the 20 smallest towns in New Jersey … until the dissolution of Pine Valley pulled it back onto the list.

#18: Washington Township

Population 693 … The Washington Township in Burlington County is the smallest of the six Washingtons in New Jersey – five townships and one borough. All told, more than 90,000 people live in those Washingtons combined.

#16: Andover

#15: West Wildwood

Population 540 … There are 12,419 residents if you combine Wildwood, Wildwood Crest, North Wildwood and West Wildwood – but this Cape May County borough is the smallest of them.

#13: Stockton

#12: Allenhurst

#11: Corbin City

#7: Harvey Cedars

Population 391 … The borough is the smallest of the six municipalities that make up Long Beach Island in Ocean County. All told, the census counts 7,552 full-time residents of LBI – but of course, far more in the summer.

#6: Mantoloking

#5: Cape May Point

#4: Loch Arbour

#3: Teterboro

#2: Tavistock

#1: Walpack

Population 7 … The Sussex County township’s population peaked 160 years ago at 851. It was 384 as recently as 1970 but now is the smallest in the state, after the federal government claimed the land through eminent domain for a dam project that was never built – now the Delaware Water Gap National Recreation Area.

How to get from Monmouth/Ocean to the Holland Tunnel without paying tolls

Sometimes even your GPS doesn't know the back way to certain places.

You're going to want to utilize Route 9 north, so if you live anywhere below Sayreville, try to navigate your way there.

Route 9 is known for being a bit of a headache during commuting hours, so the closer to Old Bridge to hop on, the better. Once you are near the Route 18 interchange, Route 9 becomes a 3 lane road, which is much easier to navigate. Routes 34 and Route 35 may also come in handy here.

Take Route 9 north until you reach the entrance to the northbound Garden State Parkway. Obviously the Parkway is a toll road, but fear not!

Once you get on the Parkway, you'll be just a few miles from the Driscoll Bridge. It's shocking there isn't a fatal accident on this bridge every single day.

As you cross the Driscoll, you'll start seeing signs for the New Jersey Turnpike. Go ahead and give the middle finger to the entrance and continue northbound on the Parkway.

The price to drive the Turnpike from Exit 11: The Garden State Parkway to the Holland Tunnel is $7.40. For commuters, it's the same going back. Imagine paying $14.80 per day to drive 20 miles each way? No thanks.

Continue along the Parkway until you reach Exit 140, US 22 / Route 82 East (Hillside). You've now successfully dodged all Parkway tolls, exiting about 4 miles before the Union toll plaza.

Follow signs for US 22 East. Stay in the middle lane as it gets a bit confusing for the uninitiated. There are also a ton of fast food options and gas stations on this route, by the way.

As you cruise along, you'll notice the back of Newark Airport to your right. Congratulations! You also just figured out how to get to the Newark Airport without paying a toll. It’s warranted: Give the airport the middle finger too. You're beating the system ... and Newark Airport stinks.

Back to focusing on the road. Before you know it, you're on the Pulaski Skyway, one of the ugliest and most neglected roadways in North America.

Soon enough you'll be in Jersey City. You will want to remain in the left lane, as 1-9 veers off to the right, and the road you're on becomes Route 139 East. The sign will say Hoboken / Holland Tunnel.

The lane situation is absolute chaos. You've got two three-lane roads separated by a divider eventually merging into one six-lane road where people are doing the Jersey Slide like it’s 1978. Straight ahead is the Holland Tunnel.

*The Jersey Slide is a driving maneuver, common in NJ, where you travel from the farthest lane all the way to the other side in one quick motion to make a turn. Other variations include getting on the highway and immediately crossing the lanes of traffic necessary to get in the left lane as soon as possible.

If you are planning on going out in Hoboken, cut a left. For Jersey City, go right. And if you're headed into the Big Apple by way of your vehicle, all the best to you. You will have to have to pay a $16 toll for that crossing.

New Jersey loses music and entertainment icon Sammy Boyd

Sammy Boyd was the epitome of the Asbury Park music and entertainment scene.Sammy, a promoter and restaurateur was a good friend of mine who passed away this week at the age of 75. His passion and love for the revitalization of Asbury Park was well noted as he served on many committees and boards to oversee the good changes that are happening to the bustling Jersey music capital.His ...

Sammy Boyd was the epitome of the Asbury Park music and entertainment scene.

Sammy, a promoter and restaurateur was a good friend of mine who passed away this week at the age of 75. His passion and love for the revitalization of Asbury Park was well noted as he served on many committees and boards to oversee the good changes that are happening to the bustling Jersey music capital.

His love for music and good entertainment was evident from his bringing top-tier music and entertainment acts to Asbury Park. Music legends like Ronnie Spector, Darlene Love, Tony Bennett, Frankie Valli, Gary US Bonds, Southside Johnny, The Weeklings Denny Laine from Wings, Tommy James, Leslie West from Mountain Felix Cavaliere from the Rascals and Pat Guadagno, just to name a few.

I had the honor and pleasure of hosting many of Sammy’s shows. It was always great seeing him and his big classic smile backstage always remaining cool even in the middle of minor chaos and problems that always happen when promoting a show.Sammy was always the first to step up when asked to help those in need. When Hurricane Sandy hit, Sammy lent his talent roster and time to put together several shows to raise monies for those hardest hit from the devastating damage.

His presence and time was always welcome at The Lakehouse Academy in Asbury Park, which provides underprivileged youth music lessons and skills in dealing with the music industry.

He was on the Asbury Park St. Patrick’s Parade Committee and would help organize the pre and post-events to raise money for the parade.

It was always a great time with Sammy. I particularly enjoyed heading with him and his business associate Judi and usually band members and others to Kim Marie’s in Asbury Park after a show, sharing a bite, cocktails and great laughs.He supported me when I did my TV show in Asbury Park, would stop by shows that I hosted that he wasn’t directly involved with because he enjoyed the music and entertainment.

He opened Marusco’s Tomato Pies in Asbury Park, a great pizza place that was voted best pizza in Asbury Park in 2021. I was on one of my diets and I was doing a broadcast of my show and he brought over a large pie. Of course, my diet went out the window and my staff enjoyed the special treat that Sammy brought over.

Sammy was generous with his time, enjoyed supporting local New Jersey artists and was truly a legend in the business. I am honored to have known him. To his beautiful wife Eileen, his family, friends and Judi from Sammy Boyd Entertainment you all have my sympathy and thanks for sharing Sammy with the rest of us.

The post above reflects the thoughts and observations of New Jersey 101.5 weekend host Big Joe Henry. Any opinions expressed are Big Joe’s own.

Check out the farmers markets in a NJ town near you

Some New Jersey towns have taken the time and effort to make room in their little hamlets to host farmers markets.Sure, there are plenty of roadside farm stands and some pretty amazing farm markets all over the state, but there's something special about hometown farmers markets.There are towns all over the state that do a really good job and bringing fresh farm products and great homemade bakers and crafters together in your local area. It also puts forth a great sense of community and goodwill both for people in town and the s...

Some New Jersey towns have taken the time and effort to make room in their little hamlets to host farmers markets.

Sure, there are plenty of roadside farm stands and some pretty amazing farm markets all over the state, but there's something special about hometown farmers markets.

There are towns all over the state that do a really good job and bringing fresh farm products and great homemade bakers and crafters together in your local area. It also puts forth a great sense of community and goodwill both for people in town and the surrounding vicinity.

This is probably the most comprehensive list of the many towns around the state that do this every year.

Some of the markets are on Saturday or Sunday morning and some host them on weekday afternoons. On a recent Sunday morning, I decided to check out the farmer's market in one of the sweetest, most family-friendly towns in South Jersey, Haddon Heights.

It wasn't too big but it was, as most things in Haddon Heights, simple and sweet. Be sure to make it a point to check one out near you.

Check out the farmers markets in a NJ town near you

Gallery Credit: Dennis Malloy

It only goes on for about a block or so, but it's packed with more than enough to satisfy your needs.

For those who love fresh produce, how can you not love this time of year?

Fresh produce and fresh locally grown flowers are really all you need, but there's plenty more.

Opinions expressed in the post above are those of New Jersey 101.5 talk show host Dennis Malloy only.

You can now listen to Dennis & Judi — On Demand! Hear New Jersey’s favorite best friends anytime, anywhere and any day of the week. Download the Dennis & Judi show wherever you get podcasts, on our free app, or listen right now.

Click here to contact an editor about feedback or a correction for this story.

These are the best hiking spots in New Jersey

A trip to New Jersey doesn't have to be all about the beach. Our state has some incredible trails, waterfalls, and lakes to enjoy.

From the Pine Barrens to the Appalachian Trail to the hidden gems of New Jersey, you have plenty of options for a great hike. Hiking is such a great way to spend time outdoors and enjoy nature, plus it's a great workout.

Before you go out on the trails and explore some of our listeners' suggestions, I have some tips on hiking etiquette from the American Hiking Society.

If you are going downhill and run into an uphill hiker, step to the side and give the uphill hiker space. A hiker going uphill has the right of way unless they stop to catch their breath.

Always stay on the trail, you may see side paths, unless they are marked as an official trail, steer clear of them. By going off-trail you may cause damage to the ecosystems around the trail, the plants, and wildlife that live there.

You also do not want to disturb the wildlife you encounter, just keep your distance from the wildlife and continue hiking.

Bicyclists should yield to hikers and horses. Hikers should also yield to horses, but I’m not sure how many horses you will encounter on the trails in New Jersey.

If you are thinking of bringing your dog on your hike, they should be leashed, and make sure to clean up all pet waste.

Lastly, be mindful of the weather, if the trail is too muddy, it's probably best to save your hike for another day.

I asked our listeners for their suggestions of the best hiking spots in New Jersey, check out their suggestions:

Tillman Ravine near stokes state forest! Following the stream to larger pools in the spring and summer are so nice to walk through! It is beautiful and so lush green!

South Mountain Reservation Fairy Trail. Not really hiking, more of a walk in the woods but so much fun with kids. They get to look for fairy houses while you walk and end at a stream they can go in when it’s warm or throw rocks in.

The backside of Stairway to Heaven from Barry lakes — high breeze wildflowers lead to beautiful wooden bridge over peaceful stream amidst peaceful serenity of the quiet woods.

New Jersey's smallest towns by population

New Jersey's least populated municipalities, according to the 2020 Census. This list excludes Pine Valley, which would have been the third-smallest with 21 residents but voted to merge into Pine Hill at the start of 2022.

Gallery Credit: Michael Symons

#20: Rocky Hill

#16: Andover

#15: West Wildwood

#13: Stockton

#12: Allenhurst

#11: Corbin City

#7: Harvey Cedars

Population 391 … The borough is the smallest of the six municipalities that make up Long Beach Island in Ocean County. All told, the census counts 7,552 full-time residents of LBI – but of course, far more in the summer.

#5: Cape May Point

#4: Loch Arbour

#3: Teterboro

#1: Walpack

Allenhurst barber learned early lesson: Cutting hair beats hauling cast iron pipes

Special to the Asbury Park PressALLENHURST - Tony Tamburello, owner of Allenhurst Station Salon, is now a well-established barber and businessman, but it took a great deal of exposure and experience to get to where he is today.“I acquired much of the attention for my barber shop from the Jersey Shore Basketball League,” Tamburello said. “I got the idea, as a longtime basketball ...

Special to the Asbury Park Press

ALLENHURST - Tony Tamburello, owner of Allenhurst Station Salon, is now a well-established barber and businessman, but it took a great deal of exposure and experience to get to where he is today.

“I acquired much of the attention for my barber shop from the Jersey Shore Basketball League,” Tamburello said. “I got the idea, as a longtime basketball fan, to sponsor a team of professional athletes to play in this league, and over time, as the league got bigger and more well known, so did our business. This was the way we grew and grew.”

Tamburello came from a family of plumbers, including a set of uncles on both his mother’s and father’s side. He started working in the business at 15, but soon decided it was not for him

“I didn’t like it,” Tamburello said. “I wasn’t cut out for blue collar work and it didn’t help that the cast iron pipes weighed a ton. It was heavy work and It just wasn’t for me. It was my background, but it didn’t suit me.”

After graduating from Belleville High School in 1956, Tamburello joined the army and rode a train to Fort Knox, Kentucky, where he served six months active duty and three years in the reserves.

“I was still 20 years old when I finished my military duty,” Tamburello said. “I spent most of my time as a clerk typist. It was just the job I was appointed and I did it without any objection, but to tell the truth, I didn’t like that either. I did it willingly just because I wanted to put my time in and move on with my life.”

'I had a knack for it'

After getting out of the army, Tamburello was unsure of what to do with his life. His mother noticed that he was particularly fussy about the way his hair looked, so she recommended that he try out barber school.

“I did six months of schooling,” Tamburello said. “It was all about shaving and cutting hair. It’s not like you’re reading a book here. You are working on actual people. As time goes on, you get better and better. I was fortunate to work in some of the busiest shops around at that time. It’s more self-taught than it is looking at something on paper. The real hard part is performing the haircuts and doing a hands-on job. Either you have it or you don’t.”

Tamburello graduated from barber school and worked where he could to gain experience.

“My first job out of school was around the corner from the barber school that I attended and I was there for six months,” Tamburello said. “It was a great notch under my belt and I kept cutting hair as well as doing what I loved at the same time. I couldn’t be happier. I had a knack for it.

“After doing that for some time, I got another job opportunity to cut hair at Newark Airport, where I came into contact with a lot of celebrities who would be passing through. It was a busy shop with a very exciting atmosphere. It was a great place to work.”

Tamburello bounced around different barber jobs, honing his craft.

“I eventually moved on with a job in Lavalette,” Tamburello said. "I worked there for three summers, continued to practice my trade and did what I could to make some good money.

“It was very apparent that the more work I put in, the better I got at giving haircuts, but I was also establishing a name for myself around the New Jersey area. That was my main motivation. I just wanted to do what I loved and have other people value my work as well. It was all about achieving my goals, which always came true.”

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Opening his own shop

In 1960, Tamburello was married and opened his first shop in Union. He worked that job for a few months, but later sold it when he moved with his wife to Manasquan. He worked at a men’s hair styling shop called Man’s World, which offered men’s hairstyling in addition to just haircuts.

“I started delving into hair styling,” Tamburello said. “It was not a difficult change of pace for me, but it was different than what I was used to. Nonetheless, I kept doing it and got the hang of it before long. I added it to my repertoire. Everywhere you work, you gain experience.”

After a couple of years with Man’s World, Tamburello moved to Asbury Park and bought Sixth Avenue Barber Shop and ran it for about three years.

“Although I valued my time in Asbury Park, I found a great spot in Allenhurst, which I bought and opened,” Tamburello said. “It was a shop that I could truly call my own. I hired a full staff that included seven barbers, two manicurists, and a shoe shine employee. I also jumped around to a couple of different spots in Allenhurst, but I ultimately ended up in my current one along Spier Avenue. I have been in Allenhurst for the last 50 years and I have really enjoyed my time here.

“Once opening Allenhurst Sation Salon, we had immediate success,” Tamburello said. “We all know what we’re doing and we have been co-workers and friends for so long. It’s a family atmosphere and we maintain that with the way that we treat our customers. People know that they will be taken care of the minute they walk into our establishment. That’s the kind of business that I always wanted to run and now I have it.”

Tamburello and his staff don't focus on trendy haircuts. It’s more about what the customer wants when they enter the shop.

“It’s hard to put a name on a specific type of haircut these days,” Tamburello said. "We try to just go off of what the customer wants and we let our hands do the talking. In the end, it comes out great and our customers are always happy with the end product.”

Tamburello's business also had to battle being shut down for months in 2020 due to the COVID-19 pandemic.

“We really had no control over what was happening,” Tamburello said. “Basically, our customers were just spreading out the times they chose to come and get their haircuts. We did not want to force the issue, so we just had to wait. We are still going through it now. No one knows when we will return to normal. We are still doing nice business here and we have a nice crew to work with right now. We’ll see what happens.”

Tamburello has been in the game for so long, it’s hard for him to imagine doing anything else.

“Although I have done everything under the sun, I don’t see myself retiring anytime soon,” Tamburello said. “It’s just not an option. It’s not work for me, it’s pleasure.”

Owner: Tony Tamburello

Location: 415 Spier Ave., Allenhurst

Phone: 732-531-3033

Website: www.allenhurststationsalon.com

Hours: 5 a.m. to 8 p.m. Tuesdays through Saturdays; 8 a.m. to 2 p.m. Mondays

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